Two days after saying he would play in the London Olympics despite a serious eye injury, San Antonio Spurs star guard Tony Parker recants that prediction and says not playing is very much a possibility.Parker was caught in the middle of the now-infamous fight involving singer Chris Brown and members of hip-hop star Drake’s entourage.Parker’s cornea was scratched in the fight, and he had surgery to remove a shard that had ”penetrated 99 percent” of his left eye.”I almost lost my eye,” Parker said in an interview posted on his website Sunday.He did not join the rest of France’s team Wednesday and will see a specialist in New York when he is cleared to take long-haul flights after July 5.”I’m seeing a specialist in New York with the hope of being given the all clear to play in the Olympic Games,” Parker said. ”Spurs are very worried.”Anything can happen, including me being out of the Olympics. The decision doesn’t belong to me anymore. It’s in the hands of the doctor and San Antonio.”Parker said he has been having hallucinations and been unable to leave his hotel room for eight days because of the risk of infection. He also has to apply five different products into his eye every two hours.”Fear sets in,” Parker said of being told he would have to undergo surgery. ”An eye is so fragile. … I couldn’t believe it. But that’s life. I was in the wrong place at the wrong time.”I didn’t have luck, but I came out well from my misfortune. It could have been worse. The rest of my career is not in question. I just have to wait for the injury to heal itself.”Chris Brown, his girlfriend and his bodyguard were among eight injured during the fight inside the W.i.P club in SoHo on June 15. Police say members of Drake’s entourage stopped Brown as he was leaving. The fight escalated and bottles were thrown.Parker is suing the New York City club for $20 million. read more

center_img Citation: Physicists Propose a Method to Observe Dirac Monopoles (2009, July 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-physicists-method-dirac-monopoles.html Ville Pietilä and Mikko Möttönen, both of the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland and the University of New South Wales in Australia, have published their theoretical demonstration in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. Here, they explain how applying an external magnetic field to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) – a large group of cold atoms that exhibits coherent quantum properties – can create point-like topological defects on the spin texture of the BEC. These defects give rise to a vorticity field that is essentially equivalent to the magnetic field of a magnetic monopole.“Since all experimental attempts to find magnetic monopoles have proven to be futile, there is no experimental evidence supporting the existence of magnetic monopoles,” Pietilä told PhysOrg.com. “Other types of monopoles without the Dirac string have been realized in experiments already in the early ‘90s in liquid crystals. An analogy of the real space magnetic monopole was reported to occur in the crystal momentum space of a metallic ferromagnet, but the experimental evidence in this case is somewhat indirect. Dirac monopoles in the more general settings are predicted to occur in various systems such as superfluid Helium-3 and dilute spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate but so far there are no (direct) experimental observations although they may have been present in some of the Helium-3 experiments. There is also a very recent suggestion on how to induce a magnetic monopole to a band insulator.“Since magnetic monopoles have never been observed, it is pertinent to ask whether there is something unphysical in the whole concept,” he continued. “Our work shows that at least the Dirac monopole can be realized experimentally, thus indicating that it is more than just a theoretical curiosity. However, it should be stressed that our work does not tell anything about the existence of magnetic monopoles in the electromagnetic field.”Pietilä and Möttönen predict that it should be possible to design an experiment to detect the monopole in this situation, if it does exist. As they explain, the magnetic field of the monopole is provided by a Dirac string, which is a line extending from the monopole to infinity. The Dirac string explains why the monopole charge comes in discrete quanta. Since the Dirac string carries two quanta of angular momentum, it is expected to be prone to splitting into two separate strings, each carrying a single quantum. Making magnetic monopoles, and other exotica, in the lablast_img read more