first_imgPARIS — Roger Federer knew when he returned to the French Open that, if things went exceedingly well, he eventually would find himself face-to-face with Rafael Nadal.Here we go.Just like old times.Federer put away Stan Wawrinka after a 75-minute rain delay Tuesday, converting a break point for just the second time in 18 chances and quickly wrapping up a 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4 victory over his friend and Swiss countryman to reach the semifinals at Roland Garros.And what a showdown comes next: Federer vs. Nadal for a spot in the final.“Always,” Nadal said, “a big match.”They are two titans of tennis, with Federer holding a men’s-record 20 Grand Slam titles, and Nadal next with 17.Nadal, who won 11 of his trophies in Paris, has gotten the better of their rivalry over the years, leading 23-15 overall, 9-3 at majors, 13-2 on clay and 5-0 at the French Open, including four finals.“My next opponent is not too bad. He can play on clay, unfortunately,” Federer joked to the crowd at Court Suzanne Lenglen.They haven’t met at Roland Garros since 2011. Federer, who has won their most recent five matches, last entered the field in 2015, when he lost to Wawrinka in the quarterfinals. He pulled out with a bad back in 2016, then skipped the entire clay circuit in 2017-18.“If you to do or achieve something on the clay, inevitably, at some stage, you will go through Rafa, because he’s that strong and he will be there,” said Federer, at 37 the tournament’s oldest semifinalist since 1968. “If I would have had a different mindset — to avoid him — then I should not have played the clay.”The only time Federer won the French Open, in 2009, he didn’t need to face Nadal, who was knocked out in the fourth round by Robin Soderling. That’s one of only two losses for Nadal in 93 career matches at the place.There was very little drama in Nadal’s quarterfinal victory this time, a 6-1, 6-1, 6-3 stroll against No. 7 Kei Nishikori, who went through a pair of five-setters the past two rounds.“He didn’t let me play how I wanted to play,” Nishikori said, “and especially if I’m not fresh, it’s not easy to stay with him.”Spain’s Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his quarterfinal match of the French Open tennis tournament against Japan’s Kei Nishikori in three sets, 6-1, 6-1, 6-3, at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)Federer vs. Wawrinka, meanwhile, lived up to the billing, a 3½-hour tussle between a couple of guys who won a Davis Cup title and Olympic gold medal in doubles together.Coming in, Federer held a 22-3 edge head-to-head, but Wawrinka knew this: All three of his victories had come on clay, including four years ago in the same round, on the same court.They were locked in a taut fourth set at 3-all when clouds grew thick and charcoal-colored. Thunder rumbled nearby. It was difficult to see, because there are no artificial lights. Play was suspended as a storm arrived. But it didn’t last long.Switzerland’s Roger Federer, right, and Switzerland’s Stan Wawrinka, left, joke, during an interruption of their quarterfinal match of the French Open tennis tournament because of the rain at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)When action resumed, Federer needed only 10 minutes to take control, getting his second break of the match by smacking a big cross-court forehand to a corner that Wawrinka couldn’t handle. It was 5-4, and Federer only needed to hold serve to end it.That turned out to be a tad complicated.He double-faulted for the only two times of the entire afternoon, once on his second match point. He was forced to deflect a break point for Wawrinka, doing so with a serve-and-volley winner. And then, finally, on his third match point, Federer closed it out with a volley, then hugged Wawrinka at the net.“A tough, tough one, for sure,” said Wawrinka, who was coming off the longest singles match of his career, a 5-hour, 9-minute victory over Stefanos Tsitsipas.Wawrinka credited Federer, saying, “It was important to be aggressive, to be inside the court, and he did that better than me.”Attacking the net at any opportunity, Federer won the point on 41 of his 60 trips forward. It’ll be fascinating to see whether he does that against Nadal, too.“I’m looking forward to the test,” said Federer, whose last major semifinal was at last year’s Australian Open.The quarterfinals on the other half of the men’s draw are Wednesday: No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs. No. 5 Alexander Zverev, and No. 4 Dominic Thiem vs. No. 10 Karen Khachanov.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Pixabay (Pixabay License) Senior United States Senator from Utah, Michael Lee, has introduced the Open America’s Water Act of 2019, a bill which would repeal the Jones Act and allow all qualified vessels to engage in domestic trade between U.S. ports.“Restricting trade between U.S. ports is a huge loss for American consumers and producers. It is long past time to repeal the Jones Act entirely so that Alaskans, Hawaiians, and Puerto Ricans aren’t forced to pay higher prices for imported goods—and so they rapidly receive the help they need in the wake of natural disasters,” Lee explained.In 1920, Congress passed the Jones Act, which requires all goods transported by water between U.S. ports to be carried on a vessel constructed in the U.S., registered in the U.S., owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed primarily by U.S. citizens.The Cato Institute estimates that after accounting for the inflated costs of transportation and infrastructure, the forgone wages and output, the lost domestic and foreign business revenue, and the monetized environmental toll the annual cost of the Jones Act is in the tens of billions of dollars. And that figure doesn’t even include the annual administration and oversight costs of the law.last_img read more