first_img Reporters Without Borders has warned against the risk of abuse of an amendment to the Computer Misuse Act intended to tighten Internet security by allowing continuous surveillance of cyber-suspects and authorising their pre-emptive arrest before a crime has been committed. Singaporean website prosecuted over election coverage SingaporeAsia – Pacific Organisation RSF_en April 10, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders has warned against the risk of abuse of an amendment to the Computer Misuse Act intended to tighten Internet security. Parliament has amended Article 15A of the Act allowing continuous surveillance of cyber-suspects thanks to real-time monitoring software and authorising their pre-emptive arrest before a crime has been committed. Cyber-criminals are liable for jail terms of up to three years.The Government says the new amendment will combat “imminent attacks” that could threaten security, essential services, defence or Singapore’s foreign relations. It says the law will not be used to oversee normal Internet use.Reporters Without Borders warned however of the risk of abuse: “Even if the fight against cyber-crime has become essential, it should not justify the granting of extraordinary powers to governments” said Robert Ménard, secretary-general of Reporters Without Borders. “The amendment adopted by Singapore’s Parliament gives too much discretion to the minister of home affairs as to the scope of his authority. We urge therefore that these decisions should be checked by an independent body” he added. One Member of Parliament, Ho Geok Choo, said that the amended article made it more like the Internal Security Act (ISA), designed to counter ordinary crime. This law adopted soon after the city state‚s independence has long been used by the government to make arbitrary arrests of political dissidents. Parliamentarians also condemned a lack of clarity in the terms of the Act. Chee Soon Juan, secretary general of the Singapore Democratic Party said the law could be used to arrest and imprison anyone suspected of being a cyber-criminal. He added that he believed the Government was using this law as a pretext to monitor Internet use. The Act does not say what type of agency or organisation could be authorised by the minister of home affairs to supervise the Internet. Nor does it explain what steps could be taken by the minister when he judges an attack to be “imminent”. The law also makes no provision for any external body to verify the basis on which decisions are taken. Reporters Without Borders condemned similar laws adopted in the United States and in the countries of the EU after the attacks of 11 September 2001. Coronavirus: State measures must not allow surveillance of journalists and their sources SingaporeAsia – Pacific November 13, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Parliament grants government powers tightening Internet surveillance October 2, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News RSF’s denounces Singapore’s disregard of press freedom ahead of its Universal Periodic Review to go further Follow the news on Singapore Receive email alerts October 15, 2020 Find out more News News Newslast_img read more

first_imgIn this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the state-of-knowledge of dust flux and variability in time and space in different sectors of East Antarctica during the Holocene. By integrating the literature data with new evidences, we discuss the dust flux and grain-size variability during the current interglacial and its provenance in the innermost part of the East Antarctic plateau as well as in peripheral regions located close to the Transantarctic Mountains. The local importance of aeolian mineral dust aerosol deflated from low-elevation areas of peripheral East Antarctica is also discussed in the light of new data from several coastal, low-elevation sites.last_img read more