first_img Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Of baseball, metaphors Against a Lowell House backdrop, C.J. Curtis delivers his speech on how the game of baseball is a metaphor for life. Emote! C.J. Curtis incorporated a variety of gestures to animate his speech about the life lessons that baseball offers all of us. On any given night during February or March in the Lowell House dining hall, the din of conversation and clamor of clearing dishes subsides to a muffled murmur at 7:20 p.m. as a faculty adviser approaches the podium to introduce the evening’s speaker. The Lowell House Speeches, initiated last year by resident tutor Sandy Alexander, are an opportunity for students to practice public discourse, while at the same time giving housemates a more personal glimpse into the lives of people they may recognize only in passing.The remarks are short — just five minutes — to encourage conciseness, and to maximize attendance by listeners. Speakers are encouraged to talk from the heart, whether that means a strongly felt experience that has shaped who they are, or perhaps an unusual idea to put forth to colleagues.Gorick Ng ’14 spoke about pushing himself outside of a protective bubble in high school, which resulted in his forging unlikely but lasting friendships beyond his comfort zone. Ng is convinced that everyone has an interesting story like his to share, and he felt propelled by the audience’s energy to speak strongly with purpose.C.J. Curtis spoke with both sincerity and humor about his passion for baseball. Not baseball as in the Red Sox or Big Papi, but baseball as a metaphor for life, as a way to teach lessons. It’s not about winning, Curtis said, but about playing day after day, about learning from your losses, about picking yourself up after a bad play and handling it better the next time, about persevering in the face of adversity. He spoke earnestly, with obvious passion, but still made jokes at his own expense.Curtis said working on his speech resulted in lasting memories. He had practiced on random groups in public spaces. On the subway, he met a street musician who could relate to performing solo in front of crowds. He spoke to a small group at an airport, and got instant feedback on his gestures and timing from a debate coach who happened to be listening.Curtis and Ng embrace the Lowell Speeches as a great new House tradition that benefits the speaker and listener simultaneously, strengthening the bonds among housemates as they get to appreciate each other in ways they never knew before. Constructive criticism Gorick Ng ’14 listens to suggestions regarding both style and content from faculty adviser David L. Ager. Passionate orator C.J. Curtis conveys some heartfelt feelings during an impassioned speech on the attributes of baseball. center_img Student teachers Gorick Ng ’14 gets coached for his upcoming speech by David L. Ager, faculty adviser. The process is two-sided, with Ager saying he learns as much as his speakers do, or more, from these sessions. Speaking your mind Hear ye, hear ye After dinner in the dining hall, students volunteer to deliver a five-minute speech for inspiration and fun, on a topic of personal significance. The program gives students practice at public speaking, while also letting fellow students get to know each other better. The Lowell House Speeches, started by resident scholar Sandy Alexander last year, are quickly becoming a popular new House tradition. All coming together For speakers, the speech itself is but the culmination of a process that involves writing, getting feedback from a faculty adviser or tutor who serves as coach, and practicing in front of friends and strangers alike. In the end, Housemates have a fuller appreciation for the profoundly personal experiences that make their fellow students who they are.last_img read more

first_img8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport. 8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport.The three-bedroom residences are fresh to the market this week with a price tag from $689,000.“Billy is a budgeting mastermind while I consider myself better at the design aspect,” Mr Gloftis said.He described Southport as bursting with potential.“It’s connected to The Southport School, Ferry Rd and the Broadwater so you’ve got all these fantastic points around the property,” he said. 8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport.They feature dramatic voids, high ceilings and stone and timber finishes.Matt Gates from Ray White Sanctuary Cove and Clare Brettel from Ray White Southport are marketing the ultra-modern property which is attracting investors. The ultra-modern apartment block at 8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport, and (right) developers Simon Gloftis and Billy Cross. Race Day for Magic Millions at Gold Coast Turf Club. Photo of (L-R) Simon Gloftis, Billy Cross. Pic by Richard GoslingMore from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North3 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa22 hours ago“My favourite part about the design is the airy feeling you get on the top level, you can almost see the Broadwater and the breeze comes right through.” The property at 18 Lenneberg St stands out from its ’90s-era neighbours. According to CoreLogic the Gold Coast personalities bought the property for $1.275 million last year.Mr Gloftis said it wasn’t his first project and he was excited to sink his teeth into more. He had the help of his builder brother Jason Gloftis with his latest project. center_img 8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport.A LEADING Gold Coast restaurateur and a former Glitter Strip nightclub king may seem like unlikely developers but the pair have joined forces to build a stylish apartment block. Simon Gloftis, owner of Hellenika, partnered up with party king Billy Cross to build six townhouses at Southport. 8-6/18 Lenneberg St, Southport.The pair have now built 14 homes between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.“I love designing things and my brother Jason is a great builder so it is really handy having him,” Mr Gloftis said. “I am focused on my restaurant full time so I’ve trusted my brother to build something fantastic and he and I know his team at Gloffy Constructions know what they are doing. “Over the process he has called to ask if he can put this or that in and it has been expensive, but I would prefer we create a quality home.” The team has transformed the Southport property from tired old brick units into tri-level terrace homes.last_img read more

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 6, 2019 at 12:37 am Contact Arabdho: [email protected] | @aromajumder center_img At the far end of the Tennity Ice Pavilion bleachers, Jill Harrington stood and yelled, “Go ‘Cuse.” It was the championship game for the Syracuse club men’s ice hockey team. Standing next to her, the Orange’s women’s ice hockey head coach, Paul Flanagan, was at the game to watch his son. He asked Harrington which of the players her son was.“Oh, he’s the one with the bowtie there in the penalty box doing the PA announcing,” she said. Harrington’s son, Michael Kuruc, was the team manager.The head coach noted Kuruc looked “in charge,” she said. Flanagan was looking for a director of hockey operations, he continued, and he told Harrington to have Kuruc call him.Now a senior, Kuruc is in that role while also being a video coordinator for Syracuse (10-21-3, 10-8-2 College Hockey America). Kuruc’s job hasn’t changed much in his three years with the team, he said. He “tags” plays during games, making it easier for players to go back and watch film specific to them, and he helps put together film packages for pregame scouting. His prep will help the Orange as they begin the CHA Tournament against Lindenwood in the first quarterfinal on Wednesday.“He’s been a three-year player,” Flanagan said. “Really, he’s part of the family. We’ve gotten to know him, he’s buddies with the kids but he keeps it professional.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnna Henderson | Digital Design EditorKuruc hopes Syracuse is the first step to an eventual Division I head coach position. He likely won’t be staying with the Orange after graduating at the end of this semester, and he has reached out to other schools, including New England College and Castleton, mainly regarding graduate assistant and director of hockey operations positions.After working multiple internships to fulfil a dream of becoming a minor league baseball general manager, he worked with SU and realized coaching is a better fit for him. Through his video coordination, Kuruc sees his hand in the product on the ice.“I feel more connected to the team itself, and that’s something that I’ve always wanted,” Kuruc said. “Wherever I went, I always wanted to be a part of the team.”The fights initially drew Kuruc to hockey, he said. When he was about 5 or 6 years old, Binghamton, where he grew up, was awarded an American Hockey League franchise affiliated with the NHL’s Ottawa Senators. His family bought season tickets to the minor league team’s inaugural season.At the time, the late Ray Emery was the Binghamton Senators’ starting goalie, and Kuruc remembers seeing Emery get into a fight one night.“Do they let kids do this?” Kuruc asked.“Yeah, there’s a youth hockey organization in town,” Harrington replied.Kuruc wondered: “How quickly can I go out and do this?”In high school, Kuruc played hockey and had three head coaches in four years. There was no structure in the team, he said. His junior year, he became the starting goalie, and with best friend Alex Kashani, Kuruc became a vocal leader for the team.He said he didn’t want to be “mean” or “pushy,” just a “positive influence.” In Kuruc’s senior year of high school, the head coach “lost the team,” Kashani said. At times, it seemed the coach didn’t know what he was doing, Kashani said, and some of the younger players became worried about playing time and why some players were getting more play time than others. Kuruc helped the players “keep their heads up” in the middle of long losing stretches. Kuruc took the time to point out positives, even in losses, such as when a player scored a nice goal or had a big hit.“He’s such a positive guy in all situations,” Kashani said, “and that’s the type of person that I would want, personally, leading my team.”Courtesy of Jim ParkerThe pressure of guarding the goal endeared him to the position, Kuruc said. It’s one of the only positions on the ice that can effectively change the outcome of the game. When Kuruc played Little League Baseball, he had the same idea, Harrington said. Kuruc always wanted to be the pitcher or catcher, the two roles with the most focus on them.In coaching, it’s different. A coach can draw up a play that, if executed correctly, would fool the defense completely, Kuruc said. His mentality carried into his work with the men’s and women’s programs at SU, where he wanted to “help everybody out as much” as he could.Kuruc has observed the Orange coaching staff similar to how he took notes on goalies in Binghamton growing up. The coaches at Syracuse also have connections in the hockey industry which can be invaluable to Kuruc as he searches for a job. Assistant Brendon Knight in particular has offered Kuruc advice on how to deal with players in difficult situations and given insight on what life on the road as a coach can be like.“You have to teach them everything that they need to know to do … in order for it to be successful the way that you looked at it in your mind,” Kuruc said.Before working with the women’s ice hockey program, Kuruc had no idea about video coordinating. He had no idea about being a director of hockey operations. He didn’t even know these positions really existed. Now, he said he couldn’t have envisioned the experience any better.“It’s been a hell of a ride, for certain,” Kuruc said.last_img read more