first_imgThe scene of today’s crashA YOUNG man fighting for his life after a crash may be transferred to a hospital in Dublin.The 23-year-old, from Cavanacaw outside St Johnston and originally from Lifford, is in a critical condition.His BMW crashed into a wall on the outskirts of Letterkenny between the Polestar and Dry Arch Roundabouts just before 1am this morning. Gardaí are furious at “ill-judged” comments today after their decision to close all four lanes of the main road into and out of Letterkenny.That’s because the accident occurred across all four lanes; and forensic investigators needed to examine the scene.At this stage Gardaí believe the motorist was travelling towards the Dry Arch roundabout when he appears to have lost control, skidded right across four lanes before coming to a halt after crashing into a wall.The incident forced Gardai to close the road which led to major traffic congestion for several hours. The tailbacks saw some people stuck in their cars for more than four hours.But Gardaí say they had a duty to close all four lanes in their efforts to establish a cause for the crash.Later this afternoon, two lanes of traffic re-opened as Gardaí continued their work at the scene.The scene of this morning’s crash. CRITICALLY ILL CRASH MOTORIST MAY BE TRANSFERRED TO DUBLIN HOSPITAL was last modified: March 20th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:crashGardaiinvestigationletterkennytrafficlast_img read more

first_imgSouth African isiXhosa-language movie Inxeba movingly explores the conflict of traditional rites of manhood, when initiates “go to the mountain”, with awakening pride in gay identity.Inxeba, also known as The Wound, had its African premiere at the 38th Durban International Film Festival in July. It opens in South African theatres in February 2017. (Image: IMDb)Brand South Africa reporterThe team behind the South African film Inxeba – internationally titled The Wound – scooped up local and international awards this year, two from the 38th Durban International Film Festival (DIFF).It was announced at the DIFF’s closing ceremony that the best director award went to John Trengrove and the best actor to Nakhane Touré. The festival was held from 13 to 23 July 2017.Inxeba had its African premiere at the festival, screening held at The Playhouse in Durban. It was in competition with Serpent (South Africa), Le Clair Obscur (Turkey), La Belle et la Meute (Tunisia), El Hombre que Cuida (Dominican Republic), Asinamali! (South Africa), Liyana (South Africa), Atanyn Kereezi (Kyrgyzstan) and Basta (Morocco).Inxeba tells the story of Xolani, a factory worker in Queenstown in the Eastern Cape. During initiation season he is also a caregiver for young men on the mountain. Xolani is gay, but no-one knows. But during the few weeks of one initiation his orientation is exposed, and drama follows.Watch the trailer:An IOL review of Inxeba highlights the strict rule in Xhosa culture that what happens on the mountain stays on the mountain. “Then add in a gay theme, which is often frowned upon by conservative people, not only in Africa but in the rest of the world, and there is potential for Inxeba to become the Once Were Warriors of Xhosa initiation,” wrote IOL reviewer Theresa Owen.Director John Trengrove said in a press release: “From the very beginning, the process of making Inxeba was characterised by intense collaboration and risk-taking. This film demanded everything from those who came on board.”Trengrove added: “I am so grateful to the incredible cast and crew who put their faith and trust in this journey. This film is a testament to their efforts. I want to dedicate this award to the silent and faceless queers throughout the African continent who face insurmountable obstacles every day in a struggle for identity and dignity.”Other accoladesThe Inxeba premiere outside Africa was at this year’s Sundance Film Festival in Utah, USA.  The film later opened the Panorama section of the 67th Berlin Film Festival.One Sundance review described the movie: “John Trengove’s hard-edged but beautifully wrought study of clashing Xhosa models of masculinity will be an eye-opener to outsiders – and some South Africans too.”Inxeba was a 2014 Durban Film Mart project. This initial pitch enabled the team behind it to get funding from a number of international financiers, resulting in a co-production between South Africa, France, Germany and the Netherlands.Nakhane Touré plays Xolani in the film. The actor is also an indie rock musician and a novelist.“I always think having one dream come true is a miracle, but to have all these things happening at once is frightening,” he told City Press.“I keep thinking the rug is going to be pulled from under my feet. On the other hand, I worked really hard on this.”The film also cleaned up at Spain’s Valencia International Film Festival, winning best film and best actor at the Cinema Jove section. Inxeba also won the best film Award in the International New Talent Competition at the Taipei Film Festival in Taiwan.Other international awards are:Best Feature Film at the 32nd Lovers Film FestivalThe Jury Prize for Best Narrative at the 19th annual Sarasota Film Festival in FloridaWatch an interview with Inxeba film’s Executive Producer Batana Vundla:It is said that Inxeba will continue to travel around the world, having been sold to 19 countries for theatrical release so far. It will be distributed in South Africa by Indigenous Film Distribution. Inxeba will open nationwide on 2 February 2018.Sources: Urucu Media, The Huffington Post South Africa, IOL, City Press and Jacaranda FM.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The hot days and muggy nights of late have certainly all but erased now distant memories of the late frost that punctuated the cool, wet spring planting season. Even though harvest season is drawing near, it may not hurt to review the crops that were hurt by the late frost in the not-so-distant past to see if any lessons can be learned for the future.May 16, 2016 is not a date Levi Runkle will soon forget. He is an agronomist for Tri Ag Products in London and he spent the day looking at frost damage in customer’s fields. He is still haunted by what he saw in his corn field that night when he got home.“That particular field was one of the best fields I have ever had in terms of emergence, stand count and population. Even the morning of the 16th it looked great when it had a little frost on it,” Runkle said. “But that night about 8:00 I came back and it was a punch in the gut. It looked pretty bad. I work with customers all the time and tell them that it will be alright, but when it is your own field it is a little different feeling. You could row it great the morning of the 16th and it looked awesome. By the 17th you couldn’t row it. You couldn’t even tell anything had been planted in some places.”After more assessment in the following days, the field looked like a total loss on the surface and multiple people (including the insurance adjuster) said it was a clear replant situation. But according to Ohio State University Extension, the best way to assess the impact of freezing temperatures on emerged corn is to check plants about five days after the freezing injury occurred and observe the condition of the growing point by splitting seedlings lengthwise. If the growing point appears white to light yellow and firm several days after the frost, prognosis for recovery is good.Ohio State University Extension corn specialist Peter Thomison said that corn as far along as the V1 stage (one leaf collar visible) survived freezing soil temperatures with little impact on crop performance or plant stand.“Agronomists generally downplay the impact of low temperature injury in corn because the growing point is at or below the soil surface until V6, and thereby relatively safe from freezing air temperatures,” Thomison said. “Moreover, the cell contents of corn plants can sometimes act as an ‘antifreeze’ to allow temperatures to drop below 32 degrees F before tissue freezes, but injury to corn is often fatal when temperatures drop to 28 degrees F or lower for even a few minutes.”A bit of digging below the surface in Runkle’s field showed good results, but there was still significant skepticism about not replanting the field.“Three days later it was ugly and my neighbors thought it was all dead, but we still had a root system under there and we still had a lot going for us. As we started digging, the stems were still good. They were still intact with a lot of good color to them and they weren’t squishy. I was doing a lot of reading at night, reviewing the things I learned in school and talking to agronomists. The growing point was still under the ground, so I just needed a little time and faith,” he said. “By May 26, though, insurance companies were looking at it and saying that it needed to all be replanted. Replanting then would have lost us a whole month on the original planting date. The plants looked bad but the root system was still good. By May 31, the plants were looking better, but the field still needed torn up according to some people.”But Runkle held strong on the belief that the sound root system and the struggling field just needed more time.The field today, though, looks great after the decision to not replant.“After two or three weeks, it came back up and some of the leaves were curled and it still looked bad. After three weeks it started catching up with the rest of the crop and now it looks great. If we would have replanted then we would have lost the great root system we had. It had been planted around April 20 to 24. Even though it looked bad above ground, it still had a great root system below ground and I wouldn’t trade that for anything going into the hot, dry conditions we saw in July,” he said. “By July 14, you really had to look to find the areas that were frost damaged. It really came back. We had fairly good pollination conditions for that corn and the root system was able to capitalize on the little water we did get. I feel a whole lot better now about not replanting that. If I’d have corn planted a month later, it would have been headed into the hot, dry 90-degree temperatures for pollination. That earlier corn was already pollinated before the heat.”Ultimately, the stand counts had been reduced by the frost, but not at levels great enough to justify replanting.“We might have lost 10% or 15% in the worst parts of the field. We would have needed to see around a 50% loss to warrant replanting that late in the season. From what it looks like today after not replanting I think we are in pretty good shape,” Runkle said. “We would have had to have a really low population to warrant a replant a month later. Where we are now is above 30,000 population and we have a lot more potential with that than a stand that was planted a month later.”While leaving Runkle’s initial corn stand was clearly the way to go, soybeans in the frosted areas did not fare so well. If frost damage occurs above the soybean cotyledons, the plant will likely recover. It will not recover if damaged below the cotyledon.“Beans were a little more of a problem with that frost, especially in a no-till situation with a lot of residue. For the most part, beans that were frosted in that situation needed to be replanted,” Runkle said of his customers’ fields. “There were still some surprises though, where the frost didn’t quite get all of the growing point, or maybe it wasn’t all of the way out of the ground and it looked bad on the cotyledons but once that opened up there was still a good growing point there. Some of those beans surprised us and the beans came back and didn’t need replanting.”Some wheat fields also took a hit.“We had some record wheat yields, with great quality this year and good straw. But, in the areas where it was flowering when it got frosted, especially in the lower areas of the field, we had about half the yield we had everywhere else. We had a lot of issues and it was hard to tell the effect of the frost when it happened because we did not have much experience with a frost on wheat when it was flowering. We learned a lot about that this year,” Runkle said. “With wheat, we had to search far and wide to find anyone with experience with flowering wheat getting frosted. There was purpling on May 18 after being frosted. It looked a little bit like head scab, but it was frost damage. It really did hurt the wheat in some areas where the wheat was flowering when it frosted.”What is now almost forgotten by some has proven to be a great learning experience for Runkle for his fields and the fields of his customers in the future.“We are going to keep track of things in that field and pull some ears on that corn,” he said. “But as of right now, I think we’re doing pretty well.”last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The nation’s two leading dairy organizations applauded the introduction of a bipartisan bill to help reverse the decline of milk consumption in schools.The School Milk Nutrition Act of 2017, introduced by Representatives G.T. Thompson (R-PA) and Joe Courtney (D-CT), would allow schools to offer low-fat and fat-free milk, including flavored milk with no more than 150 calories per 8-ounce serving, to participants in the federal school lunch and breakfast programs. The bill allows individual schools and school districts to determine which milkfat varieties to offer their students.The International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) and the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) strongly support the bill and encourage Congress to pass it. Once enacted, the bill would make permanent the administrative changes in the school lunch program proposed earlier this year by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, in one of his first official actions earlier this year, supported giving school districts the option to offer a variety of milk types as part of the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs.“Congressmen Thompson and Courtney recognize the nutritional role that milk plays in helping school-aged children to grow and develop to their full potential,” said Michael Dykes, D.V.M., IDFA president and CEO. “We appreciate their steadfast commitment to reverse declining milk consumption by allowing schools to give kids access to a variety of milk options, including the flavored milks they love.”The legislation includes a pilot program to test strategies that schools can use to increase the consumption of fluid milk.  This could include ways to make milk more attractive and available to students, including improved refrigeration, packaging and merchandising.“Milk is the number-one source of nine essential vitamins and minerals in children’s diets, and when its consumption drops, the overall nutritional intake of America’s kids is jeopardized,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation. “When kids don’t drink milk, it’s extremely difficult for them to get sufficient amounts of three of the four major nutrients most lacking in children’s diets:  calcium, potassium, and vitamin D.”He pointed out that in just the first two years after low-fat flavored milk was removed from the school lunch program, 1.1 million fewer school students drank milk with their lunch. The Act also includes a provision to allow participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC, to have access to reduced-fat milk for themselves and their children.“Expanding options for WIC participants will encourage mothers to help their young children grow up strong and healthy,” Dykes said.last_img read more