first_imgJan Braai wants the nation to unite around a fire on Heritage Day. Photo: braai.com By Anne Taylor23 September 2013September 24 is Heritage Day in South Africa – a public holiday intended to focus the nation’s attention on the importance of South Africa’s diverse cultural heritage and traditions. It is a day when we are called on to find unity in our diversity.“When our first democratically elected government decided to make Heritage Day one of our national days, we did so because we knew that our rich and varied cultural heritage has a profound power to help build our new nation. We did so knowing that the struggles against the injustice and inequities of the past are part of our national identity; they are part of our culture. We knew that, if indeed our nation has to rise like the proverbial phoenix from the ashes of division and conflict, we had to acknowledge those whose selfless efforts and talents were dedicated to this goal of non-racial democracy.” – Nelson Mandela, Heritage Day speech, 1996This year’s theme, set by the government, is “reclaiming, restoring and celebrating our living heritage”. In Cape Town, entrance to all Iziko museums will be free during heritage week, from 23 to 29 September.Read about the in_herit festival at Cape Town’s Company Gardens and other Heritage Day activities on Play Your Part: Celebrate SA’s rich heritage For many South Africans, Heritage Day is also unofficially national braai day. Originally the initiative of Jan Scannell, known as Jan Braai, South Africans haven’t needed much encouragement to light a fire and braai. Yes, you can barbeque anywhere, but you can only braai in South Africa!“It is called many things: Chisa Nyama, Braai and Ukosa to name few. Although the ingredients may differ, the one thing that never changes is that when we have something to celebrate we light fires, and prepare great feasts,” Jan writes on his website, braai.com.In a recent inteview with NPR, Jan uses boerewors (a South African sausage) as the perfect analogy to describe the rainbow nation: “You’ve got sausage-making skills from Europe that came with the European settlers to Africa. Then you’ve got spices and the knowledge of how to use them from the East, stuff like coriander, nutmeg, cloves and then in Africa it was very typical to cook all your food on a fire.”Smoke, charred meat and a cold beer – what’s not to love? See you across the flames tomorrow.Read more on SouthAfrica.info: Celebrate South Africa on Braai DayJan Braai’s Top 10 braai tips on CapeTownMagazine.comlast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture will soon begin aerial treatments designed to control the gypsy moth population in Ohio.  Treatments on 1,308 acres in Licking County will begin in late April or early May, as larva and leaf development reaches the optimal threshold for treatment.Treatments are administered using a low-flying aircraft that flies just above tree tops. High humidity, low temperature and minimal wind are crucial for a successful application. Treatment will most likely take place during early morning hours.The department will use Foray (Btk), a naturally occurring bacterium found in the soil that interferes with the caterpillars’ feeding cycles. These treatments are not toxic to humans, pets, birds or fish.Ohioans can view maps of treatment blocks at www.agri.ohio.gov. Daily updates on treatment progress across the state are available on the website or by calling 614-387-0907 or 1-800-282-1955, ext. 37, any time after 5 p.m.Gypsy moths are invasive insects that defoliate over 300 species of trees and shrubs. In its caterpillar stage, the moth feeds on the leaves of trees and shrubs and is especially fond of oak. A healthy tree can usually withstand only two years of defoliation before it is permanently damaged or dies. In Ohio, 51 counties are currently under gypsy moth quarantine regulations.The department uses three programs to manage the gypsy moth population in Ohio. The suppression program is used in counties where the pest is already established, but landowners voluntarily request treatment to help suppress populations. The second program, slow-the-spread, occurs in counties in front of the larger, advancing gypsy moth population. The third program is the eradication program, used in counties where isolated populations develop ahead of advancing moth populations due to human movement of the moth. Officials work to detect and control isolated populations to slow the overall advancement of the gypsy moth infestation.For more information about the gypsy moth or for specific treatment locations, visit www.agri.ohio.gov.last_img read more