first_img It is my pleasure to award the Pollinator Champion Award to St Albans Primary School in Havant and the Trythall Community Primary School from Penzance. I would like to thank these young people and their teachers for their exceptional work in helping to protect these vital pollinators and their dedication in raising awareness of bees’ needs. Bees’ Needs Week is about celebrating the fact that everyone can get involved by growing more flowers, leaving patches of garden to grow wild, cutting grass less, not disturbing insect nests, and thinking carefully about using pesticides. Bees and other pollinators are vital contributors to the beauty of our landscapes, our economy and our £100 billion food industry. It is inspiring to see such a wide range of organisations celebrating these essential creatures for this unique Bees’ Needs campaign – showing us that all of us can play a part and help pollinators to thrive. The Government is developing a Nature Recovery Network in England to provide 500,000 hectares of additional wildlife habitat, more effectively linking existing protected sites and landscapes, thereby improving access to habitat for pollinating insects; In November 2017, the Environment Secretary announced that the Government supported further restrictions on the use of three neonicotinoids due to their harmful effects on bees and other pollinators, and the UK voted in favour of the EU Commission’s proposal in April 2018; Since 2015, nearly half (47%) of new Countryside Stewardship agreements included the Wild Pollinator and Farm Wildlife Package. The package ensures that a minimum of 3% of the farm is converted to habitat for farm wildlife including pollinators; Defra has funded new research by the University of Exeter which has found a way to track the invasive Asian hornet back to the nest. The hornets prey on honeybees so tracking the predator back to the nest will enable inspectors to take swift action and destroy them; Defra has provided a home for the rare Black Bee to the hives on the roof of the department’s London building. This particular species was on the verge of extinction a few years ago. Recent actions Government has taken to protect bees include: Two schools, St Albans School in Hampshire and Trythall in Cornwall, received a Pollinator Champion Award from Biosecurity Minister Lord Gardiner. The award recognises their invaluable work in helping pollinators thrive.Presenting the awards at Carnaby Street, Defra Minister for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity, Lord Gardiner, said: Shaftesbury is delighted to support the launch of Bees’ Needs Week, on our very own ‘Carnabee’ Street, which is also being backed by many of our occupants in the area. There has been an alarming decline in the pollinators across the UK, which play a vital role and are the unsung heroes in our ecosystem. We can all play our part in helping to boost the population, even in urban environments. If you take a closer look around our areas of London’s West End you can see we’ve introduced pockets of pollinator friendly plants wherever possible. With hanging baskets and window boxes, green walls and roofs, and even the introduction of rooftop beehives adorning parts of the area, it offers a much-needed oasis for our pollinating friends. The London Honey Company are offering free honey tasting; Simon Quayle, Director, Shaftesbury, said: A swarm of activity is taking place in the world-famous shopping destination to raise awareness of Bees’ Needs including: Wildflower Turf – the company behind creating the idyllic countryside landscape for the opening ceremony of the London Olympics – have stepped in to decorate the Hive and showcase some of the most beneficial native wildflower habitats for pollinators. Defra’s annual Bees’ Needs Week got underway today (Monday 9 July) with an official launch on London’s Carnaby Street – renamed ‘Carnabee Street’ for the duration of the campaign which runs to Sunday 15 July.Defra has partnered with Carnaby London, the leading West End shopping and dining destination to promote bee and pollinator action from government, conservation groups, industry and retailers and to raise awareness of what people can do to help bees.Environment Secretary Michael Gove said: The campaign also celebrates the efforts of a wide-range of organisations that will be present in The Hive – a discovery center dedicated to pollinators on Carnaby Street, London: The Royal Horticultural Society are handing out pollinator-friendly seed: Blooms for Bees; Carnaby Street has been renamed ‘Carnabee Street’ and the iconic arch has undergone a bee-themed makeover; A pop-up ‘Hive’ will open at 3 Carnaby Street which will host educational and fun games, installations and talks in partnership with Defra alongside charities, universities, businesses and landowners; Visitors to Carnaby will be able to follow an art trail around the area’s 14 streets, with illustrated bees by London based artist Lizzie King on the windows of participating shops and restaurants; Shops and restaurants located in the world-famous shopping destination have created bespoke bee themed products, menus, cocktails and offers to raise awareness of the Bees’ Needs campaign. Reading University are showcasing their leading research and a Bumblearium has been installed offering people a window into the secret lives of bees; Last year’s Pollinator Champion, Rebecca Twigg, will be in the Hive with her fascinating augmented reality bee trail;last_img read more

first_img Published on November 12, 2019 at 10:11 pm Contact Eric: [email protected] | @esblack34 Facebook Twitter Google+ Kendall Coleman picked up his head and scanned the field, looking around for the referees. To one side were a handful of his teammates, celebrating a stop they’d just made for a two-yard loss. Syracuse was trailing Florida State, 6-0, on Oct. 26 and SU’s defense had just set up a third down.Or so they thought. As Coleman rotated his head the opposite way, his eyes locked onto the yellow penalty flag that had been thrown in his direction. Roughing the passer. Fifteen yards. Instead of facing third down and four from their own 34-yard line, the Seminoles had a first down in SU territory. Five plays later, FSU scored a touchdown. Syracuse never came within 10 points the rest of the game.Penalties have been a constant for the Orange (3-6, 0-5 Atlantic Coast) all season long. Syracuse is tied with Cincinnati for the most penalties per game this season with 9.33, a program-high during the past 10 seasons. The Orange are also in the top 10 in total penalties, penalty yardage and penalty yardage per game. Sometimes the calls are innocent, coming on a physical mistake like a false start by a freshman offensive lineman. Others, like Coleman’s roughing the passer, are mental and disrupt the SU defense’s game plan.“It sucks because if it was a mental mistake,” SU cornerback Ifeatu Melifonwu said, “you did everything right physically, you got a three-and-out or whatever and then a mental mistake could cost you seven points.”Melifonwu was also called for a personal foul penalty during Syracuse’s contest against the Seminoles, as he got into a skirmish after a Florida State touchdown. The Orange were called for 14 penalties as a team during the game, a season-high. It was the fourth different game this season that SU had been called for double-digit penalties. After doubling Boston College’s penalty total during its last game, Syracuse has now been called for more penalties than its opponent in every single game this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDino Babers doesn’t have a problem with penalties on SU’s younger, inexperienced offensive linemen. Due to the pace of its offense, he said, it’s natural for players to not catch up to the speed of the game immediately. True freshman Matthew Bergeron’s false start penalty in the second quarter against the Seminoles was understandable. But when upperclassmen are called for penalties, like Airon Servais was on back-to-back plays against Western Michigan earlier this season, it’s a different story.“That’s the thing that’s troubling,” Babers said. “We’ve got too many older guys having penalties, and we can’t have that with them.”Karleigh Merritt-Henry | Digital Design EditorOn the offensive line, Evan Adams’ main priority is protecting Tommy DeVito, even if it means committing a holding penalty to keep DeVito upright. Babers categorizes those penalties as physical, whereas Coleman and Melifonwu’s penalties were mental. So was the unsportsmanlike conduct penalty called on Antwan Cordy against North Carolina State on Oct. 10, when SU’s defense made a stop on third down only for Cordy’s emotions to get the best of him and result in a flag and a Wolfpack first down.Syracuse’s struggles with mental mistakes began against Holy Cross on Sept. 28, when two SU players were ejected due to targeting penalties. While Babers implied after the game that one or both of the calls may have been wrong, the hits confirmed that one of Syracuse’s biggest issues this season has been its discipline.“Every team in the country has a tally (of penalties),” Adams said. “They’re all reported, they’re all on film, you watch them about 15 times. Every team in the country has a tally, who has what. You try to reduce them as much as possible but at the end of the day, penalties do happen.”Melifonwu said that cutting down on the physical penalties as a cornerback are easy. Keeping a level head is more difficult. Even when Babers brings up penalties and mental mistakes before games and in practice, or when a play is dead and a drive is seemingly over.Through nine games this season, Syracuse has proved that it can’t even do nothing right. Usually, its mistakes have resulted in penalties. Other times, it’s turned into points for its opponent. In a season that has been underwhelming in so many ways, SU’s lack of discipline hasn’t helped.“It’s frustrating when you lose momentum,” Melifonwu said. “It sucks when penalties keep the drive alive, especially if they score on that same drive. Penalties are a huge issue.” Commentslast_img read more