first_imgTAGS: Gloucester Having taken into account mitigating factors, including Mr Attwood’s guilty plea, clean record, clear remorse and exemplary conduct at the hearing, the Judicial Officer reduced the period of suspension by the maximum amount of 50 per cent and suspended the player for a period of nine weeks.The period of suspension was back-dated to begin on the day of the match in order to take into account that Mr Attwood had been suspended by his club soon after the match as a result of the incident. Mr Attwood is free to play again on Monday, 21 February, 2011.Under the IRB Recommended Sanctions for Offences Committed within the Playing Enclosure in contravention of Law 10.4(b), ‘A player must not stamp on an opponent,’ carries the following recommended sanctions – Low End: 2 weeks; Mid Range: 5 weeks; Top End: 9 to 52 weeksSee the incident below David Attwood, the Gloucester Rugby player appeared before an independent Disciplinary Hearing in Dublin on Thursday, 6 January s a result of the citing complaint arising from the Amlin Challenge Cup Pool 5 match against La Rochelle at Kingsholm on Sunday, 19 December, and was banned.The citing complaint made by the Citing Commissioner for the match, Tom McCormack (Ireland), was for stamping on La Rochelle prop Petrisor Toderasc (No 1) 15 minutes into the first half. As a result of the incident, Mr Toderasc sustained injuries to his face.Mr Attwood pleaded guilty to the citing complaint but maintained that he had not intended to make contact with Mr Toderasc’s face. The independent Judicial Officer, Robert Williams (Wales), considered all of the evidence, including video footage of the incident, medical reports relating to Mr Toderasc’s injuries and testimony from Mr Attwood.The Judicial Officer heard submissions on behalf of ERC Disciplinary Officer, Roger O’Connor, and on behalf of Mr Attwood from his legal representative, Richard Smith QC, and from Gloucester Rugby coach, Carl Hogg.The Judicial Officer did not find that Mr Attwood intended to make contact with Mr Toderasc’s face, but he determined that Mr Attwood was guilty of foul play in contravention of Law 10.4(b) in that he had stamped on Mr Toderasc. Having also concluded that the stamp was intentional and that it had caused injury, the Judicial Officer found that the offence was in the top-end range of the level of seriousness for an offence of this type and decided on an entry point of 18 weeks.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS PARIS, FRANCE – MARCH 19: Wales players look dejected after the RBS 6 Nations Championship match between France and Wales at Stade de France on March 19, 2011 in Paris, France. (Photo by Jamie McDonald/Getty Images) I’ve always been a big fan of Stephen Jones and there will still be a role for him and Phillips to play certain games in the World Cup.Shane Williams says he has played his last Six Nations. As a Welsh fan you want him to play on because he’s still probably the best in the world at creating chances from nothing. But you understand him wanting to finish at the top. Still, we won’t see another Shane for some time.We need to keep key men like him and Adam Jones fit for the World Cup. Getting to the semis is the target but getting through our group will be a major hurdle.This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine. To find a newsagent which sells Rugby World in UK visit http://www.ipcmedia.com/availability/index.php?code=rugby Wales had a disappointing Six Nations campaignTHE SIX Nations was disappointing for Wales and, looking ahead to the World Cup, I’m not optimistic. Before the Six Nations we’d probably have been happy with three wins out of five, but it’s not just about the results. It’s about performance and we never got going.We only played well in patches and the worst game of all was against France, when we hardly looked like creating anything. We turned over too much ball and gave away too many penalties, probably out of frustration.We’ve developed a good defensive system and that means we can compete with any side, but we need to play with more ambition and maximise the talent available to us. We’re too predictable and that’s been the same for the past three years. It’s becoming easy for sides to read us.Our structure doesn’t allow us to do anything other than hit up. If you go 15 or 16 phases and gain five yards, there’s a lot of energy consumed. Warren Gatland would say the defenders consume more, but Wales are constantly looking up and seeing numbers in front of them and then you tend to go lateral. We’re caught between two stools in terms of wanting to play players like James Hook who have creative ability, but using a structure that doesn’t allow us to use their ambition. Gatland has to think long and hard about that. We need to be more ambitious because I think the players we’ve got can handle that.Our game is too structured and often slow and cumbersome, and sides no longer allow us the space we had when Gatland first came in and developed this style.We have four games to go (Barbarians on 4 June, England on 6 and 13 Aug, and Argentina on 20 Aug) and we have to use them as a chance to regain form and get confidence. We must change tactics and play with more freedom to get the best out of what we have. If the players go out with a sense of freedom, which a lot of them would prefer, we can do well.Hook likes to go out and play but I don’t think our game plan allows him to be himself. The key to most successful sides is the ability of players to read situations and make changes during a game.If we’re talking about playing with more ambition we must have the ability to move ball away quickly from set-pieces and breakdowns, and you need a scrum-half in the Dwayne Peel mould to do that. Mike Phillips is a fine player and an unbelievably committed individual, but with the World Cup in mind Peel needs a chance this summer to show whether his qualities suit Wales if they can shake the shackles off. Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipclast_img read more

first_imgBlown away: Scotland are unable to stop Billy Twelvetrees scoring during England’s 38-18 Calcutta Cup victoryBy Alan DymockAFTER SCAMPERING backwards and forwards all afternoon, a red-faced and heavy-legged Matt Scott leant against the bar in the conference room and pronounced, “that was the hardest game of rugby I have ever played.”He was not pronouncing this into a recording device, nor were there any vulture-like press folk prodding him to extol how much inner agony he was experiencing after losing a Calcutta Cup match at Twickenham, 38-18. He was simply involuntarily sighing into the room after a day of being pulverised.Prodigious talent: Stuart Hogg impressedScotland had paid a dutiful homage to the Cup, tearing into action when England allowed them, and screaming after men in white whenever they knew embarrassment was a distinct possibility. They did not, in fact, embarrass themselves for one moment.However, as Scott Johnson told the press pack afterwards, “if it looks like a pig, it’s a pig.”“We were not, bullied. We just did not get [the contact area] right,” the interim coach said after the game. “A lot of it is positional and a lot of it is technique. We just did not do our part right. We were slow in our line speed.“I don’t question, for one minute, the resolve of the boys. They are a fantastic bunch of kids. They are good players. We just have to work on areas of the game.”The contact area was tough. Johnson was right, even if he did not paint vividly a picture of how and why. Indeed, it would have been interesting to hear from Dean Ryan about Scotland succumbing to English inertia. Instead it falls to reviewing instances.At times, it felt like Scotland were Indiana Jones running away from an onrushing boulder. England would roll onwards, spinning wickedly through Joe Launchbury and Mike Brown or barrelling through Brad Barritt and Chris Robshaw, and Owen Farrell could have a little think, and decide when to play his pass.Scotland simply could not stand in the boulder’s path and absorb that roll. The ball was too quick and the half backs too safe. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Kelly Brown, always a stubborn opponent, did his best. He had been paired with Alasdair Strokosch because both blindsides would take the lashing and the bashes at the ruck in order to allow Richie Gray and Johnnie Beattie the freedom to attack or tackle, away from the dark misery of the breakdown.When Strokosch departed with a busted cheek, though, David Denton came on. He is a young man born to run, but too lax and haphazard at the breakdown, often hitting and ricocheting off his man or falling to the floor mid-wrestle. So when he looked to run and threw helium-filled passes or failed to connect hand with ball, Scotland were ruckers down and uncertain of who their best carrier would be.There were moments of brilliance from carriers, of course. Beattie went on a few rumbles, at one point carrying the ball in one hand as he bounced away from tacklers. Gray was direct and roaring. The problem was that England were able, unlike the Scots, to absorb or effectively scramble.Scotland did score two lovely tries, and here we must bow in reverence to the exuberance and unequivocal talents of Stuart Hogg.Greig Laidlaw struggles to evade onrushing English tacklersThe full-back not only unfurled several powerful and breathtaking kicks, but he ran with a mischief and belief that undoubtedly unsettled the English. The first try came from him returning a kick through a gap he knew Mike Brown would be missing from, before galloping towards a bump with Alex Goode and helping set up a tenth minute try for debutant Sean Maitland.As part of potentially deadly back three, the Hawick-born lad stood out. So when Maitland returned the favour, taking turnover ball and sending it down the line with his boot like a dropped coin tumbling towards a drain, Hogg sprinted forth and clipped his way to the line.These tries were born out of individual action. As lovely as they were, they were not forged from a planned move and a pattern of play that belligerent ruckers made sure would happen. The breakdown was, as Johnson commented, a battle that the English won. The going was, as Johnson said, was horribly tough.The problem is that there was perhaps little Scotland could do in the face of the omnipresent white wall. They know that they must make first up tackles and that they need to secure ball in the hope that their fly-half can offer something worthy of running on to.center_img It seems unlikely that Ruaridh Jackson and Greig Laidlaw will be swapped out because of one unproductive day. However, listening to Johnson and Scott it is almost certain that everyone wants life a little easier thanks to cleaner ball. Scotland look good when they have that and so a quicker, more mobile rucking unit may be plumped for against Italy.We will soon see if Johnson’s Scotland is one that drops players rather than allowing time to atone for the day everyone was battered backwards.last_img read more

first_imgThe South came back in sublime fashion to win the inaugural Icons of Rugby Golf Tournament. Southern Hemisphere Win Icons Of Rugby Golf TournamentThe northern hemisphere is used to losing to the southern hemisphere in rugby, whether it be the New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, or occasionally Argentina. But now it appears as if this has carried over into other sports too.In the inaugural Icons of Rugby golf tournament, the Southern hemisphere team pulled off a sublime comeback to win the cup.The Icons of Rugby event consisted of two teams, North and South, which were made up of some of the greatest rugby players to every play the game. They would battle it out over a variety of formats to try and secure crucial points for the team.North: The team of players representing the Northern hemispherePlaying at The Buckinghamshire Golf Club, Brian O’Driscoll, George Gregan, Gareth Edwards, Stuart Hogg, Bryan Habana and countless others competed in a Ryder Cup style competition.The North was captained by former Ryder Cup winning captain Sam Torrance whereas the South Was captained by former US Open winner and Kiwi, Michael Campbell.Leaders: The two captains shake handsFor the first few sessions, the North was ahead and they eventually took a 13-11 lead going into the singles. But the South came romping back after Gregan, Christian Cullen, Fourie Du Preez, Grant Fox, Matt Burke, John Smit and Victor Matfield all secured points for their team. For the full list of scores across the two days click here.Also do not forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bryan Habana then picked up a half point against Mike Catt which all but assured the victory for the South. Final score was 18.5 points to 17.5.Vital: Bryan Habana picked up a huge half point in the singlesCampbell, a proud Kiwi himself joked; “I guess the Northern Hemisphere boys are used to the feeling of losing against the Southern boys”Sam Torrance said, “I take my hat off to Michael and the boys, it was a great day’s play and they played incredible golf this afternoon. Every bit of this event has been fantastic apart from the losing part!”“The first Icons of Rugby has been a tremendous success and I thank the players for making the event a great spectacle,” said Thomas Brookes, Founder of the ICONS-Series. “The golf has been superb, I thank the crowds for coming out to cheer on their rugby heroes. The planning starts now for the next ICONS of Football next year.”The Icons of Football will return in 2019 in Spain, followed by the first Icons of Cricket next July back at The Buckinghamshire. Plans have already been made to do another Icons of Rugby tournament after the 2019 World Cup. It will be held in Japan in October.last_img read more

first_img Dan Biggar: How to kick to regain Expand Beauden Barrett: How to mix your kicks LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Wales fly-half explains how to test defences… Boot boy: Owen Farrell hard at work in training. He is England’s second-highest point-scorer (Getty) “If you make it about where your body’s going then the follow-through takes care of itself. The hardest part of the punt kick is to hit low. If I hit high to the target I’ll probably lean back more. Whereas if I hit low, it makes the body go through the ball and past the target. So in practice, hit low and you’ll get through the ball a lot further.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… All Blacks fly-half Beauden Barrett, the World Rugby… Expand Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Beauden Barrett: How to mix your kicks The Saracens and England talisman explains the ground rules for punting the ball The former England fly-half explains the key elements… Collapse Owen Farrell: How to kick out of hand Owen Farrell is renowned for the accuracy of his goalkicking, whether for Saracens, England or the Lions. But putting boot to ball in open play is another part of his considerable skill-set. Here the fly-half/inside-centre talks through kicking out of hand…Follow your instincts“You need your hands around the ball to be able to do anything with it – to pass it, kick it, run with it, anything. Usually 
you don’t have a preconceived idea that you’re going to kick the ball straightaway; sometimes you just drop it onto your foot.“I find kicking quite instinctive, and you get 
a lot of feedback from the feel of it.”Point to target“When punting, obviously you point the ball in the direction that you want it to go. Then you want to kick up through the ball, cutting through the middle 
of it.“The main thing is getting your bodyweight going through it – not just making it about the kick but about where your body’s going so that the ball will follow.”Find the right height Toby Flood: How to pass with precision Toby Flood: How to pass with precision Practise on both feet“I practise most days. A lot of punting can be done in warm-ups and kicking sessions. You just need one team-mate, then kick the ball to each other.“You’re aiming for contact through the bootlaces. And use both feet – I wouldn’t say I was the same off both sides but I’d be confident enough.”This article originally appeared in the February 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine. Dan Biggar: How to kick to regainlast_img read more

first_imgCollege students ‘keep the faith’ Youth & Young Adults Rector Albany, NY December 7, 2011 at 11:24 pm Great to see what Richard Sloan is doing at Columbia! Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Members of the Episcopal Student Center at the University of Texas in Austin on a mission trip in New Orleans, Louisiana. Photo/Jewelz Jacobs[Episcopal News Service] College can be a daunting environment for students who want to stay spiritually connected as they learn to navigate a world away from home and their parents.But with a little initiative and research, students can find opportunities to deepen their relationship with God, with campus ministries that help them acquire tools to face the challenges they encounter as students.That is one of the missions of the Rev. Richard Sloan, an Episcopal chaplain who is working with students at Columbia University and Barnard College in New York City.“In the same way that fraternities and sororities build a community around social activities, the campus ministry builds a community of faith by getting students together in a small group to connect and build relationships,” he said.The Episcopal Church has about 325 campus ministries across the country, including a group of about a dozen students that meet weekly with Sloan for a chapel service on Sunday evenings and for lunch and a prayer service on Thursdays.Seeking out such opportunities of fellowship early can help students throughout their college years, said Peter Thompson, a Columbia senior from northern Virginia who is a member of the club and plans to be an Episcopal priest.“Take advantage of resources,” Thompson said. “Know what is out there for you. You get busy, and it’s harder to keep showing up, but if you have a community, it’s easier.”Finding a faith community was important for Betsy Wade, a Barnard College freshman from Seattle. Although she did not choose to attend Barnard for its Episcopal student group, she learned about the club online before arriving in New York and planned to join.“Most schools have a chaplain on campus, and they are great resources for students,” she said.The Rev. Glenn Libby has built a ministry that offers both group and individual experiences at the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles.During college, students are “allowed to explore and work towards something authentic. It’s about having the courage to make their faith their own and be bold enough to declare that,” said Libby, who also oversees all campus ministries in the Episcopal Church’s Province VIII.Although many campus ministries focus on group gatherings, such as worship services, Libby has found that “individual spiritual guidance” resonates with many students at USC and UCLA.How a campus ministry operates varies greatly from campus to campus, and it’s important that the Episcopal Church stays on top of cultural shifts and changing technologies, Libby said.Ecumenical outreach is also vital to a campus ministry, said the Rev. Ginger Grab, an Episcopal priest and member of the interfaith chaplaincy at Bard College in the Hudson Valley of New York, which promotes exploration of various religions, including Islam, Buddhism and Judaism.“We are providing a range of spiritual exploration, which can be a large part of the college experience,” Grab said.Parents have to understand that it’s OK if their child questions their faith; it’s a part of the learning process, she said.“I can’t assure them that their child will stay connected with their faith in college. Parents need to be tolerant, understanding and supportive as their child explores,” she said.The Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA conducted a study in 2008 to assess the spirituality of undergraduate college students. The study found that although religious observance decreases during college, belief in the “spiritual” increases.According to the report, which is based on data collected from more than 14,500 students at 136 colleges nationwide, 44 percent of the freshmen surveyed said they attend a religious service frequently. That percentage dropped to about 25 percent once they are in their junior year.But by junior year, more than 50 percent of students said “integrating spirituality in my life” was “very important” or “essential.” That’s nearly 8 percent higher than those students in their freshmen year.David Fierroz was baptized in the Roman Catholic Church but didn’t attend services growing up. And when he came to Columbia a few years ago from Southern California, his relationship with God wasn’t of great concern to him.It wasn’t until his senior year when he started to reconnect spiritually after a friend invited him to attend the Episcopal chapel service on Sundays.He and his wife, Crystal Oliva, were married by Sloan and still attend the Sunday services, even after both have graduated.“We’ve made friends and have found community here,” he said.— Elizabeth Paulsen is a Brooklyn-based freelance writer and member of Christ Church in Bay Ridge. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing GEORGE SWANSON says: Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Elizabeth PaulsenPosted Dec 7, 2011 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

first_imgHong Kong Anglicans serve society From gambling counseling to education Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 5, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Children attending St. Mark’s Church’s daycare in Macau. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Throughout its history, the Anglican Church in Hong Kong has been engaged in serving its communities through social services, education and other programs, with one of the best examples being St. James’ Settlement.What began in 1950 as a Boys & Girls Club in a room loaned by a Chinese temple in the Wanchai district of Hong Kong by 1963 had grown into a six-story building; by 1987 a 12-story building including St. James’ Church, a multi-service community service center and a primary school. Over the same time period from 1963 to 1987, the number of people receiving services, ranging from food provisions, education, healthcare services, daycare and elder care, grew from 164,000 to 700,000, annually.Today, St. James’ Settlement employs 200 social workers and serves more than 10,000 people daily at 47 service points on a $54 million annual budget. Having outgrown its current space and in order to expand its services, it is constructing a new $80 million, 13-story building on an adjacent property.Most non-governmental organizations providing socials services in Hong Kong rely on government support for 80 percent of their budget, said Chief Executive Officer Michael K.C. Lai, adding that St. James’ receives 30 percent from the government and raises the rest through fundraising, sponsorships and fees for service, with middle class people paying higher fees to subsidize services for the poor.“What a remarkable, holistic vision,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, adding that she hadn’t seen anything on that scale before.Josephine Y.C. Lee, St. James’ Settlement’s assistant chief executive, and Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori during a tour of St. James’ in Hong Kong. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonJefferts Schori toured St. James’ Settlement during a recent visit to the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, including Hong Kong and Macau, both governed as special administrative regions of the People’s Republic of China. The Province of Hong Kong was one stop on the presiding bishop’s three-week visit to Anglican Communion provincial churches in Asia, including the Philippines, Japan, South Korea, the Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan and China.The presiding bishop preached to a full house on the first Sunday of Lent during a service at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong Feb. 26.Established in 1998, the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui includes three dioceses and a missionary district – Hong Kong Island, Eastern Kowloon, Western Kowloon and the Missionary Area of Macau. Some 30,000 people worship in about 40 congregations and mission points, served by more than 70 clergy members.“We are working here quite well,” said the Rev. Peter D. Koon, provincial secretary general of the Hong Kong Anglican Church. “We are the third largest social welfare provider and the second largest education provider … that with 30,000 Anglicans.”In 2006 Macau, a former Portuguese colony, overtook in GDP per capita Hong Kong, a former British colony and an international finance center, for the first time ever as gambling revenue soared.The Macau government ended the territory’s gambling monopoly in 2002, which resulted in the number of casinos increasing from 11 to 34; fewer casinos than Las Vegas, but four times the annual revenue.“Before the casinos the best jobs were police and government jobs,” said Lee Kwok Hoo, a service director for the province in Macau. “But then they rushed to become dealers.”Out of the 160,000 households in Macau, one to two family members work in the casinos, he said.“Kids think they can get a job in the casino so they don’t study as hard.”In 2007, the province began providing gambling counseling and in November 2011, opened Macau S.K.H. Gambling Counseling and Family Wellness Center to address some of the societal and family needs that have resulted from gambling. The facility, which includes a daycare and recreation center, handles 250 cases with 18 employees and nine social workers. It also operates a hotline service that has received more than 2,200 calls.With a population of just over half a million people, there are six degrees of separation, said Lee, and most people prefer not to receive counseling face-to-face.Jefferts Schori, who was formerly bishop of Nevada, sympathized with the difficulty facing residents of such a gambling-focused area. “People in Nevada who have problems with gambling often leave because there are temptations everywhere,” she said, “… slots in grocery stores and gas stations.”In Macau, the presiding bishop visited also St. Mark’s Church, which was the first Chinese-Anglican congregation there, said the Rev. Odette Pun Oi-Kuan, the church’s 17th vicar, who is a native of Macau.St. Mark’s has a school, serving 2,000 students in K-12 and adult education, and runs a daycare center. And like the Gambling Counseling and Family Wellness Center, St. Mark’s serves families affected by gambling.“The Anglican Church is the only one that has Macau people serving families and casino workers,” Oi-Kuan said.The presiding bishop was joined in Hong Kong and Macau by Peter Ng, the Episcopal Church’s global partnership officer for Asia and the Pacific; Alex Baumgarten, the Episcopal Church’s director of government relations; the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop, and Richard Schori, the presiding bishop’s husband.–Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.En español: http://bit.ly/whpvxD Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Stuart Kenworthy says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Christopher Epting says: March 26, 2012 at 5:40 pm Started in January. Today, began 2 Samuel and Acts. Using Oxford Annotated NRSV with fine introductions and footnotes. It’s been a long time since I read the Bible through and am enjoying reading each book in its own integrity and context without skipping around. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Jerry Emerson (Christ Church Dover DE) says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY By Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 26, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 26, 2012 at 6:35 pm The church should be grateful for this Spitit-inspired initiative by Fr Marek Zabriskie. A very important and sacred enterrprise and endeavor. And so good for the Episcopal Church. Thank you! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC center_img March 26, 2012 at 10:45 pm On behalf of our church, St Matthew’s, Austin, I want to state clearly that the Bible Challenge is going well! Thanks Marek, for starting this, and Pat, for writing a comprehensive article. I believe this will be spiritually transformational for our parish. Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Sharon Kelso says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 26, 2012 at 6:36 pm We did this in a small Men’s Group last year. At the beginning we all thought no-way, however as we proceeded all the things mentioned above apply. We found ourselves time and again considering some basic principles like: “original Sin” “God’s Love” “a remnant” “the Law” “our pride”, etc. etc. As pointed out above, yes we Episopalians do feel biblically illiterate, but once doing this one realizes how much of our prayer book comes directly from scripture. Doing it in a small group, I think, really helps to keep one at it. I know I needed them to keep me going. Psalm 1:1 March 28, 2012 at 11:31 am On the website for Biblical Studies there is a guide for readings each day. It helps me to stay focused (I’m on day 87). It is, for me, a beautiful way to start my day and gives food for thought as well. I am grateful for the movement that got me back into bible study and reading. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal News Service] Thomas Butler’s days are busy and full; the Flourtown, Pennsylvania, lawyer is in and out of courtrooms, representing clients in commercial litigation lawsuits.But not before he’s met the Bible Challenge; to read the entire Bible in a year.“It’s a grounding for me each day,” said Butler, 65, a parishioner at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania, who started last January and is anticipating completing the Bible by Easter.Then he wants to start all over again.“Reading the Bible from cover to cover is like running a marathon,” Butler said during a recent telephone interview from his office. “Okay, you’ve accomplished it but what have you really done? My conclusion thus far is that there’s a lot more to get out of the Bible and a lot more to be gained by continuing to read the Bible.”Which is something he’d never considered until he attended a friend’s memorial service at St. Thomas Church in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania, on Jan. 26, 2011. The rector, the Rev. Marek Zabriskie, invited the congregation to join him in the Bible Challenge.“I’d never thought about reading the Bible before I heard Marek’s invitation,” he recalled. “It was a challenge which on that day struck me as something I wanted to do.”After starting with Genesis 1 he is nearing the Book of Revelation, and acknowledges it’s taken him more like 15 months, but says the extra time was well spent.“I used to get up maybe like everybody, rush around, jump in the shower, shave, get dressed, have a quick breakfast and do whatever I was supposed to do that day,” he said.“Now, I take a half-hour and read the Bible and think about it. I find I’m not rushing as much. It has given me a different context and background in which to view things that are going on in the world and in my life.”Zabriskie came up with the Bible Challenge in 2010 as a way to rejuvenate his own spiritual life.Like many busy clergy, “I was feeling spiritually and physically worn down after Christmas, after helping lead seven services in three days,” he said. He decided to challenge himself to read the Bible in a year.“After three to four days I found it so incredibly spiritually gratifying, that it felt like God put it on my heart to invite others,” he said. He sent an invitation to a few friends, then to church members and then to “those not in our church, who I play tennis with or socialize with and got the same response. I kept on promoting it. We had 50 people within 24 hours.”And the good news has continued to spread, nationally and globally. “Fifteen dioceses around the world are doing it; ten are in the United States,” he said. “There are 45 churches doing it now and many more going to start. I anticipate we could have members in over a thousand congregations by the end of this year.”The effort also led to creation of the Center for Biblical Studies (CBS), whose website notes that “many vibrant and growing churches share one thing in common-they have a strong commitment to reaching and reading the Bible.”“Reading the Bible on a daily basis will inspire many people to start new ministries, make important decisions and significant changes in their lives. It will give them strength and comfort as they face major life challenges and allow them to feel truly alive in Christ,” according to the website.The Bible Challenge (TBC) can be adapted for individual, congregational, and diocesan use. Although Zabriskie designed a one-year reading schedule it is adjustable for portions of the year, such as a Lenten series on the Psalms, or the New Testament, or a Gospel.Since its inception, the CBS board has picked up such supporters and advisors as Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, former Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Frank Griswold and biblical scholar Walter Brueggemann. People ages 13 to 93 in churches from England to Nigeria, Tanzania to Pakistan are participating.TBC encourages participants to read three chapters of the Old Testament, one psalm and one chapter of the New Testament each day. The readings can be downloaded on iPhones, iPads, Kindles, Nooks or CDs.Participants may start on any day they choose, using a variety of Bible translations, including The Message by Eugene Peterson and The Story by Zondervan as well as age-appropriate versions of the Bible, in order to reach all age groups, he said.They are asked to begin with Genesis 1-3, Psalm 1 and Matthew 1 on the first day, for example. A meditation posted on the website offers the context for group study: “Today is all about beginnings,” it says, including setting the stage for the creation story in Genesis and connecting it to the birth of Jesus in Matthew 1.Considering that “bridge” between the old and new testaments is one of the reasons Martha King, 66, a parishioner at St. Peter’s Church in Del Mar, California, in the Diocese of San Diego, joined TBC.King, a retired English teacher and current Sunday school teacher, is in her third year of Education For Ministry (EFM), a four-year theological education program in the Episcopal Church that includes Scripture study.“I like what I read in the sense of reflecting on the Bible as a whole,” said King. On March 22 she was on Day 81 of TBC, and had read Joshua 10-12, Psalm 68 and John 2.“There was a lot of conquering and tribal warfare and God bringing hail down and trapping the kings in their caves and Jesus throwing the moneychangers out of the temples. I can’t help but see a connection between the Gospel of John and the way Jewish people were tending their temple,” King said. “I definitely find myself more open to the lessons in church on Sunday.”TBC participants at Grace Church in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, started during Lent and are already noticing its effects, according to the Rev. Karl Schaffenburg, 55, the rector.“We’ve been a ‘Father Knows Best’ parish and [TBC] is empowering people to understand they’re called into ministries,” he said of the parish, which has an average Sunday attendance of about 128.“They ask questions they wouldn’t have asked in the past, are taking a deeper look at their own faith, becoming more thoughtful about it and more intentional in worship.”He adapted Sunday adult forums into discussion groups. It’s also drawn a handful of people from the community, non-Episcopalians “who frequently stay around for worship afterwards.”“We say that Scripture, tradition and reason are the three legs of our faith but we don’t spend a lot of time exploring them,” Schaffenburg added. “This allows us to explore, to understand why we believe what we say we believe.”The Rev. Merrill Wade, rector of St. Matthew’s Church in Austin, Texas, started two discussion groups to support TBC. About 50 people have signed up and are experiencing “a grand opportunity to talk about” scripture and understand it in a different way, he said.For instance, he says, consider the practice of temple sacrifice, including “grappling with the idea of a burnt sacrifice, of the priest as the butcher and the cook and the holy man, and getting a sense of what it was like to bring the animal to the altar,” he said.“You think of our lives — we have meatpackers who do it all completely out of our sight, most of us. It arrives as a gunky-looking thing with plastic wrap on it. Nobody prayed over it, nobody thanked the animal for giving up its life. At least in this (temple sacrifice) there was a sense of gratitude that the animal gave its life. Its throat was slit; it was killed, dressed, eaten. In some ways that seems more humane than what we do.”And tackling other questions: “Why is God in a constant conversation with Moses, but that doesn’t seem to be the case with Jesus? What does that say about the way all these texts we’ve woven together and the understanding that all of this was verbal dictation from God, yet Jesus had to go off by himself to pray?”The church, about five miles north of the campus of the University of Texas, has an average Sunday attendance of about 430.“We’re not solving problems, we’re learning about how misty the look-back is for us. That we just can’t possibly know what it was like to live in that world and how useful it is to stretch our imaginations.”Participants are seeing “how much distance there is between pre-monarchy Israel and the 21st century and Austin, Texas. This was a really different world, and they’re getting that,” he said. “The idea that the Bible is benign and God’s just speaking to us in a kind of fanciful way, the idea that the Bible is something easy to read and understand, that’s pretty well been stripped from their consciousness.”And then there’s that pesky belief that, despite four Scripture lessons weekly and a three-year lectionary cycle, many Episcopalians are biblically illiterate.The Rev. Paige Blair, 41, St. Peter’s rector, compares the encounter with TBC to living in Boston and taking the subway. “You can know the city like crazy by subway but … to actually find how it’s all connected on the ground really takes walking it, pounding the pavement.”“Our prayer book is replete with Scripture and … we hear a ton of it in church but it’s excised from its context” on Sunday mornings, she said. “We very happily cut and paste Scripture or have a lectionary insert so people don’t have to thumb through their Bibles” to recognize the connection. “It’s a bit unhinged from its incarnate reality, its 3-D reality in the Bible.”TBC gives people that context, added Blair, 41. St. Peter’s average Sunday attendance is 310 and all age groups are represented among the 40-some parishioners taking the Bible challenge, from high school students to retirees — even a couple of professors from a nearby Bible college.That’s in addition to the church’s three regular Bible studies. TBC participants are noticing a new 3-D reality.“Now they can see where the Decalogue rests in Exodus, where the Lord’s Prayer falls within the Sermon on the Mount and the Sermon on the Plain in Matthew and Luke, respectively,” she says.Blair said she is grateful to Zabriskie “that he heard the call to just try this himself and that he invited others to join him.“There are people in Pakistan, in the city where Bin Ladin was found, there are people all over the world engaging this wonderful journey because Marek heard the call of the Spirit and invited others to join him. That’s discipleship, right? This is a real gift.”—The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent with the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. The Bible Challenge: A ‘marathon’ of a read Effort to read Scripture in a year goes global The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (5) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Merrill Wade says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jun 26, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI El Seminario del Suroeste anuncia el lanzamiento de Educación Teológica Para Ministerios Emergentes TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Seminary of the Southwest] El Seminario del Suroeste anuncia el lanzamiento de Educación Teológica Para Ministerios Emergentes (ETEEM) programada para comenzar el 17 -19 de Octubre del 2013. ETEEM es un programa de certificación conjunto llevado a cabo en español por el Seminario del Suroeste y el programa del Seminario Luterano en el Suroeste.Diseñado para satisfacer los requerimientos de educación teológica para la ordenación, el programa de certificación trae a los estudiantes al campus en Austin, Texas cuatro veces al año durante tres años en sesiones intensivas de tres días.El Seminario del Suroeste admitirá a los estudiantes Episcopales con ETEEM, coordinará las prácticas de esos estudiantes y ofrecerá los estudios Anglicanos y el curso de política para el programa de estudios. El Programa del Seminario Luterano, habiendo ofrecido educación teológica alternativa por 10 años, provee el curso para el programa impartido por profesores doctorados de la facultad.“La educación teológica para lideres de habla hispana en nuestra Iglesia será enriquecida por la asociación del Seminario del Suroeste con el Programa del Seminario Luterano.Estoy seguro de que esto cumplirá con las necesidades de las personas que no han encontrado programas de grado tradicionales de seminario accesibles por las barreras del lenguaje, estudios cursados o el compromiso del tiempo,” dice el Reverendo Canónigo Anthony Guillen, misionero de los Ministerios Hispanos/Latinos para la Iglesia Episcopal. “Me complace que la Oficina del Ministerio Hispano/Latino estará trabajando con el Seminario del Suroeste y recomiendo altamente ETEEM’.Los solicitantes deben tener el permiso y la carta de apoyo de su obispo para aplicar a ETEEM. El Reverendo Paul Barton, PhD es director de ETEEM y profesor de la historia del Cristianismo Americano y la misionología y director de estudios eclesiásticos hispanos en el Seminario del Suroeste. La información para entrar está disponible poniéndose en contacto con [email protected] Seminario del Suroeste es un seminario Episcopal acreditado en Austin, Texas que ofrece grados de maestría para el ministerio ordenado y para las personas que buscan la educación y la formación para la certificación de consejería, capellanía y cuidado pastoral, la formación espiritual y la religión. El profesorado titular de tiempo completo enseña los cursos teológicos centrales y más de 30 profesionales en el centro de Texas conforman el cuerpo docente adjunto de la facultad. El Seminario del Suroeste tiene 135 estudiantes de todo los EE.UU. inscritos en sus grados. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ read more

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Vivir en Egipto en medio de la revolución, las protestas y las nuevas oportunidades Entrevista con el sacerdote episcopal Paul-Gordon Chandler In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Posted Sep 27, 2012 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler[Episcopal News Service] El Rdo. Paul-Gordon Chandler es un sacerdote episcopal que vive en Egipto, donde ha servido, desde 2003, como rector de la iglesia de San Juan Bautista [St. John the Baptist] en El Cairo. En esta entrevista para ENS, Chandler reflexiona sobre los cambios ocurridos en Egipto a lo largo de los últimos dos años y habla acerca de las recientes protestas provocadas por una película de contenido antiislámico.ENS: Egipto ha presenciado algunas importantes transformaciones en los últimos dos años. ¿Cómo le describiría el panorama político y la infraestructura del país a alguien que en verdad no comprende el contexto?P-GC: ¿Por dónde empieza uno, respecto a lo ocurrido en Egipto durante los últimos 18 meses, para no hablar de las últimas semanas, o incluso de los últimos días? Cada día está tan lleno de sorpresas que resulta difícil estar al tanto de todo.Obviamente, después de más de 60 años de un régimen autoritario, y décadas de ser un Estado policial, Egipto está experimentando lo que podrían llamarse “dolores del desarrollo”. Sin embargo, hay que decir que, en las elecciones más democráticas desde 1952, los egipcios eligieron libremente a su líder, Mohamed Morsi, de la Hermandad Musulmana, que obtuvo el 51 por ciento de los votos. La famosa Plaza Tajir, estalló de júbilo cuando se hizo el anuncio. Muchos estaban jubilosos porque había ganado un promotor del islamismo conservador. Otros, no tan entusiastas respecto a esto e incluso preocupados respecto a la agenda de la Hermandad Musulmana, se alegraban no obstante de la verdadera victoria de la revolución.Uno de los mayores retos ahora mismo está relacionado con la infraestructura básica del país, para no mencionar los problemas económicos. Estos retos han empezado realmente a acumularse. Hay excesiva basura dondequiera, menos seguridad (la fuerza policial es mínima), la electricidad se interrumpe cada vez más, se encuentran menos medicinas en las farmacias, se cree que el trigo está por acabarse, hay escasez de agua embotellada, etc.Un respetado analista político de aquí describió bien la situación actual de Egipto con estas palabras: “Egipto atraviesa un estado de fluidez revolucionaria”.Sin embargo, en medio de todo, vemos muchas señales positivas que son decisivas para la salud futura de Egipto, y admitimos que debemos tener una perspectiva a largo plazo. De manera que estamos arraigándonos en Egipto e inmensamente orgullosos de los egipcios.ENS: ¿Qué significan estos cambios para el país en general, y para los cristianos en particular?P-GC: Los más preocupados con la victoria de Morsi fueron los cristianos coptos. Sin embargo, la preocupación se basaba en gran medida en el temor a lo desconocido. Lo que nos resulta familiar, incluso si es indeseado, siempre se percibe como más seguro. Comenzaron a propagarse rumores contra Morsi, y él no sólo trató de disiparlos, sino que durante su discurso de la victoria Morsi procuró apaciguar los temores de los coptos. “Nosotros, como egipcios, musulmanes y cristianos…enfrentaremos juntos los conflictos y las conspiraciones que amenazan nuestra unidad nacional… Todos tenemos iguales derechos, y todos tenemos deberes hacia esta patria”. Incluso él ha renunciado oficialmente como miembro de la Hermandad Musulmana luego de su discurso de la victoria. Sin embargo, algunos coptos no están convencidos, y creen por el contrario que el país ha sido objeto de una manipulación, lenta pero segura, [para implantar] un régimen islámico. ¡Egipto es un país de rumores!Una de las primeras decisiones del presidente Morsi fue invitar a los líderes de todas las denominaciones cristianas al Palacio Presidencial, donde los recibió amistosamente y les garantizó que los cristianos son ciudadanos iguales en Egipto y que es su deber [del presidente] de que todos los ciudadanos disfruten de sus derechos. El presidente también les contó relatos de la historia del islam y de cómo los líderes musulmanes tienen un vivo interés  en garantizar los derechos de la ciudadanía a todos los cristianos de Egipto. El presidente prometió hacer su mayor esfuerzo para garantizar los derechos de los cristianos, especialmente en lo tocante a la construcción de iglesias. Los líderes cristianos salieron de la reunión de 35 minutos muy estimulados.Y algo muy notable, el presidente Morsi invitó a los líderes de las denominaciones en Egipto a reunirse con él el mes pasado, por segunda vez. Dos veces en menos de dos meses para hablarles y escucharles. Eso no había sucedido en Egipto en los últimos 30 años. El presidente Morsi les garantizó que su fe islámica le exige ser amable y justo con las personas de otras fes. Ellos se fueron de la reunión muy animados y determinados a hacer lo más que pudieran para llegar a ver el Egipto con que todos sueñan.Donde yo trabajo, en la iglesia episcopal de San Juan, en el sur de El Cairo, las singulares oportunidades para el ministerio han crecido exponencialmente en este “nuevo Egipto”, con mucha más libertad religiosa que antes de la revolución. Pronto celebraremos nuestro Foro Abrahámico del otoño que congrega a cristianos y musulmanes en torno a un tema de importancia para el país. Nuestro orador principal es Jeffrey Fleishman, el jefe del buró de Los Angeles Times en El Cairo, [quien también es] novelista y finalista de un premio Pulitzer. Sin embargo, independientemente de la realidad, cada vez hay más cristianos coptos que desean emigrar. Con demasiada frecuencia persiste este temor intrínseco al “otro”.ENS: ¿Cuáles son las últimas protestas de El Cairo? ¿Quién protesta y por qué? ¿Son las protestas sólo una respuesta a la película antiislámica o se trata de algo más complejo que eso?P-GC: Sé de muchos que han seguido en la prensa occidental los disturbios que han estado ocurriendo en Egipto y otras partes del Oriente Medio como resultado de la oprobiosísima película que produjo un egipcio de origen cristiano que viven en EE.UU. y cuyo tráiler de 13 minutos se divulgó en YouTube.Nosotros estuvimos realmente muy seguros. La mayor parte de los disturbios estuvieron muy localizados, justo en los alrededores de la embajada de EE.UU. en el centro, y aunque empezó con un par de miles de manifestantes, se redujo rápidamente a un grupo pequeño. En algunos otros países, como Libia, Túnez y Yemen, las protestas han terminado con consecuencias más serias. Sin embargo, aquí en Egipto, ha sido hasta la fecha en gran medida una mezcla de diferentes grupos que quieren aprovechar la oportunidad de servir a sus propios intereses, ajustar cuentas y expresar sus frustraciones. En Egipto, los recientes tumultos no han sido provocados en su mayoría por los fundamentalistas islámicos, tal como lo refleja la prensa.En este sentido, el área de la embajada de EE.UU. cerca de la plaza de Tajir se convirtió en un campo de batalla para gente descontenta, y no sólo como una protesta contra la película. Según el respetado analista político y periodista egipcio Ayman El-Sayyad, “…la gente aprovechó la oportunidad para desahogar su furia”.En cuanto a quiénes son ese gente, bueno, es un grupo de lo más variopinto, todos con diferentes razones para manifestarse violentamente. El Sayyad lo puso muy bien: “Son…islamitas contra el gobierno de EE.UU.; revolucionarios contra las fuerzas de seguridad [egipcias]; salafitas [una agrupación islámica fundamentalista] contra la Hermandad Musulmana [que es mucho más moderada], y los marginados [es decir, desempleados] contra la realidad en la que viven”.ENS: ¿Cómo han respondido a las protestas el presidente y otros líderes políticos, dado su compromiso de construir una sociedad más democrática en Egipto?P-GC: Por suerte, el presidente Morsi, si bien ha condenado la deshonrosa película, también ha condenado enérgicamente la violencia de cualquier índole en las manifestaciones. Esta denuncia pública de la violencia ayudó a disolver un montón de otras posibles protestas violentas.Tal como lo reportara el New York Times, Khairat El-Shater, el viceconsejero de la Hermandad Musulmana de Egipto, dijo: “Nuestras condolencias al pueblo norteamericano por la pérdida de su embajador y de tres miembros de su personal en Libia”. Él a continuación resaltó que no hace responsable al gobierno de EE.UU. ni a sus ciudadanos por las acciones de “los pocos” que abusan del derecho a la libre expresión, no obstante su rechazo a esta película antiislámica. También condenó “el allanamiento a los terrenos de la embajada de EE.UU.” por los manifestantes egipcios, y describió el actual estado de cosas en Egipto con estas palabras: “Egipto atraviesa por un estado de fluidez revolucionaria, y la ira pública debe tratarse con responsabilidad y con cautela”.Luego, en breve, estamos a salvo y la gran mayoría de los egipcios sigue siendo en extremo magnánima en todo sentido con los que visitan su país. Si bien la prensa da con frecuencia la impresión contraria, nada podría estar más lejos de la realidad que experimentamos aquí.ENS: Algunas de las justificaciones para producir esta película en contra del islam se basan en el derecho que hay en Estados Unidos a la libertad de expresión.  ¿Qué pasa en los casos donde la libertad de expresión ofende a millones de personas?P-GC: Es muy difícil explicar el concepto de la libertad de expresión en un contexto como éste. El punto de partida global es completamente diferente que en la mayoría de las culturas occidentales. En una cultura de la vergüenza, que prevalece en el Oriente Medio, [en la cual] conservar el honor es la máxima prioridad. Las personas de distintas partes del mundo reaccionan de manera diferente, especialmente en lo que respecta a asuntos de fe.Una cosa interesante es que los cuatro obispos diocesanos episcopales/anglicanos enviaron recientemente una carta conjunta al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sugiriendo “que se negocie una declaración internacional que ilegalice el insulto intencional y deliberado o la difamación a personas (tales como los profetas), símbolos, textos y conceptos religiosos considerados sagrados por la gente de fe”. Su motivación al hacer eso es que creen que podría ayudar a evitar la posibilidad de más violencia, entre personas de diferentes ambientes culturales o filosóficos o entre feligreses de diferentes religiones.Ya crea uno o no que ésta sea la respuesta adecuada, muestra cuán seriamente los lideres de la Iglesia local aquí están tomando todo esto.[Los cuatro obispos son el Rvdmo. Mouneer Hanna Anis, obispo de Egipto y obispo presidente de la Provincia Episcopal/Anglicana de Jerusalén y el Oriente Medio; el Rvdmo. Michael Owen Lewis, obispo de Chipre y del Golfo; el Rvdmo. Bill Musk, obispo zonal para el Norte de África; y el Rvdmo. Grant LeMarquand, obispo zonal para el Cuerno de África.]ENS: Usted ha dicho que los que protestan no son sólo fundamentalistas islámicos. Pero en algunos países, las protestas incluyen en gran medida a personas asociadas con agrupaciones extremistas, ¿no lo están ellos, o es una distorsión de la prensa?P-GC: Para ser muy franco, el contexto de cada país es tan completamente diferente que resulta difícil responder con exactitud. Uno de los retos que encaramos aquí es que Occidente suele ver al “mundo musulmán” como un cuerpo monolítico, casi como si fuera una entidad política y religiosa. Sin embargo, los problemas de un país son diferentes de los de otro país, como son diferentes, por ejemplo, los problemas de EE.UU. de los de Dinamarca, vistos ambos como “países cristianos” en el mundo musulmán.ENS: ¿Cuán perjudiciales son las inexactitudes reportadas en la prensa?P-GC: Ante todo, no estoy seguro de que los medios de prensa occidentales estén distorsionando intencionalmente la situación. Lo más probable es que haya una falta general de comprensión a fin de presentar las noticias dentro del contexto correcto, y también que la naturaleza misma de los medios de comunicaciones se concentra en reportar la controversia, lo cual con frecuencia magnifica desproporcionadamente lo que ocurre. Como resultado, el daño hecho es que, basándose en la desinformación, se tiende a reforzar los estereotipos negativos de las personas en esta región.ENS: ¿Qué debe aprender el mundo a partir de esta serie de sucesos?P-GC: Yo creo que todo esto es un convincente recordatorio de cuan importante es para todas las personas (incluidos los de los medios de prensa) de ser responsables y ejercer autocontrol al expresar o promover opiniones insultantes o malévolas con respecto a la religión. En cambio, debemos concentrarnos en hacer la paz con todos los pueblos. 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