first_imgOn Thursday, the Saint Mary’s Class Gift Campaign paid homage to the ghostly inhabitants of Saint Mary’s with its Sweet Treats and Scary Stories event. It is rumored that various ghosts, including the spirit of Sister Madeleva, former president of the College, roam the halls of Saint Mary’s after hours. At the event, staff and students read excerpts from “Quiet Hours: Revealing the Mysteries,” a book written by three Saint Mary’s alumnae. This collection of short stories tells actual experiences of Saint Mary’s students, faculty and staff with ghosts around campus. Participants listened to ghost stories while enjoying a spread of sweets including a chocolate fondue bar, apple cider, hot chocolate, pumpkin pie and candy apples. “I had read ‘Quiet Hours’ before, but my favorite story is of the girl walking down the avenue,” first year Madeline Haverilla said. “A murderer sees her on the road, but doesn’t attack her because he sees someone walking with her, even though she was alone. It gave me the chills, but it also made me feel like there is someone looking out for us.” Continuing the scary theme of the night, students participated in a costume contest that awarded the scariest, creepiest costumes. First prize was a bobblehead figure of Dr. Carol Ann Mooney, president of Saint Mary’s College, and her husband George Efta. Due to cold temperatures, very few students dressed up. “I would have dressed up if it wasn’t so cold outside,” sophomore Kira Terrill said. The Class Gift Campaign also raffled off $50, $25 and $10 of munch money in a drawing. Students entered the drawing by picking up tickets at the dining hall and student center throughout the week and by presenting them upon arrival at the event. This year, the Class Gift Campaign co-sponsored the event with the Resident Hall Association (RHA). “RHA has always hosted an Autumn Harvest, an event with fall themed treats, for students. But this year, Class Gift Campaign approached us with the idea of working together on this event,” RHA President Kat Nelson said. “The event has had a great turnout. We had canoe races around the lake earlier, and then everyone came over afterwards. Some faculty and staff members brought their families, and it was great to see some professors with their kids.” The event also gave students the opportunity to make individual donations. “We hope that students will see how much tradition there is at Saint Mary’s and how important it is that everyone give back to the College,” Amy Dardinger, assistant director of Phonathon, said.  “It’s a fun event to host around Halloween time, but its also a way to remind students that many people before them made a Saint Mary’s education possible.”last_img read more

first_imgNotre Dame has appointed David Bailey as the new head of the Office of Strategic Planning and Institutional Research, according to a University press release. As associate vice president for strategic planning, Bailey will assist the Office of the President in developing the University’s strategic plan, assessing progress, overseeing departmental strategic planning and issuing reviews for the provost and executive vice president, the release stated. University President Fr. John Jenkins said Bailey’s past experience outside the University as well as his time as the interim head of the office have prepared him well for the position. “David’s experience as a Notre Dame alumnus, his time in the office he will now head, and his long and distinguished career in business amply equip him for this critical position,” Jenkins said in the release. “His appointment further strengthens the University’s advancement toward institutional excellence.” Bailey graduated from Notre Dame in 1983 before receiving an MBA from the Stern School of Business at New York University in 1997. He previously worked at IBM, Wall Street firm Gerard Klauer Mattison & Co. and Goldman Sachs.last_img read more

first_imgPope Francis’s recent apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” highlighted many of the economic and social justice issues of today’s world and prompted reactions from critics worldwide.  William Purcell, associate director for Catholic Social Tradition and Practice at the Center for Social Concerns, said the pope “is not being an idealist, but a realist with ideals.”  Purcell said the apostolic exhortation’s contents are both prescriptive and intellectual, focusing largely on pastoral theology and how the Church can engage and shepherd people. “Francis addresses [“Evangelii Gaudium”] to the whole people of God, so not just to the laity, but also to the bishops, clergy and religious,” Purcell said. “He’s talking to the leaders at all levels, including lay leaders … and he’s challenging us to find creative ways to share the key emphasis of God, which is love.”  Many of the critiques of and negative reaction to the text are “short-sighted,” Purcell said, misunderstanding the context of the pope’s statements and its background in Catholic Social Tradition. One notable criticism came from talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, who said Francis’s ideas were “pure Marxism” in a Nov. 27 show about the document, titled “It’s Sad How Wrong Pope Francis Is.”  Purcell said people should remember that the pope is writing about theology, not ideology. “What he’s really talking about is joy – that’s what ‘gaudium’ means,” Purcell said. “He’s talking about how we’re called to evangelize and that nobody likes a grim do-gooder. “What he’s saying is that we’ve got to be joyful about it, we’ve got to be embracing it. We should attract people by our actions, and so we should be joyful and life-giving.”  The apostolic exhortation is the first thing Francis has written completely on his own during his papacy, and Purcell said it presents his vision of what the Church is about, speaking from his position as the head of the institution. “I think it’s exciting because people have been taking notice,” Purcell said. “Some people react to it out of their ideology and not their theology, and people struggle with some of the things he’s talking about.”  Purcell said throughout the document, Francis quotes bishops from across the world, as well as past popes and saints. Because of this, the content “isn’t new, but part of our tradition.”  “His insight comes from talking about these things in a new style, in an uplifting way, so people see the power of what we’re called to do,” Purcell said. “He becomes so welcoming, so charismatic, and he speaks to the common person.  “It doesn’t become esoteric or dense, because he’s speaking to the person in the pew. People can read this and understand it … and I think they get excited by it.”  The four main themes of the text are joy, poverty, peace and justice, Purcell said. Beyond the thematic theological elements, Francis “becomes prescriptive and deals with real, concrete ways of addressing problems,” he said. “The beauty of the exhortation is that he writes so well, and he writes so positively and so openly,” Purcell said. “This is a pope who is a Jesuit, so he’s a thinker. There are ideals of things like solidarity and the common good, but he’s being a realist about how we try to address those things. “He gives concrete examples; he names saints or people or particular things so it doesn’t just become words like ‘solidarity,’ but you get the stories and symbols and scripture behind that makes it come alive.”  To best utilize the document’s wisdom, Purcell said parishes need to find a way to break it into parts and find pastoral applications for it. “It’s too much to swallow all at one time, because it’s so rich and there’s so much good within it,” he said. “But it’s fun to look at since [Pope Francis is] just so positive, and he speaks so directly. He’s prophetic, but not obnoxious.”  Contact Ann Marie Jakubowski at [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second installment in a three-part series discussing the Rutagengwa family’s search for God from the 1994 Rwandan genocide in light of their trip back to Rwanda in December.In April 1994, Jean Bosco and Christine Rutagengwa were preparing for their July wedding when the Rwandan genocide began. They became separated in the chaos.“We were getting ready for our wedding, and we survived at the Hotel [des] Mille Collines, now known as Hotel Rwanda,” Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said. “I got there first … praying to God to bring my fiancée there. I left the hotel to bring her back to the hotel, and that was to us a testimony that God listened to our prayers.“We stayed at the hotel about 40 days, and during those days, every day was a dangerous day.”The Hotel des Mille Collines was the only safe area at the time, but Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he left anyway, trusting God to keep him and his fiancée safe.“Every day in the hotel, we put ourselves in the hands of God,” he said. “We prayed for our safety every single day at the hotel. We were surrounded by the killers.“It was like a small island, or let’s say, a sinking boat surrounded by sharks. It was like the Titanic sinking surrounded by sharks.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he felt that he and Christine survived the genocide for a reason. After they were evacuated from the hotel by United Nations’ peacekeepers, others hiding there were killed by the militias, he said.“We were lucky enough to survive, and for us we have a mission — the mission is to spread a message of love,” he said. “We have a testimony that love is stronger than death. … Evil didn’t win.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he has drafted a manuscript about the search for God from the Rwandan genocide, to be published later this year.“Before the genocide, I was certain I was just like everybody else, thinking about your future, your family, not thinking much about other people, about being involved in the community,” he said. “After genocide, [my wife and I] really have changed. We both feel like we have a mission to be involved in the community.“Whenever it’s possible to help your neighbor … to help someone recover from tragedy, [you should] get involved in their affairs, help them live a better life. You only realize that when tragedy strikes your own life. Then you realize that other people need you. You don’t realize that until your own life is impacted.”Photo courtesy of Fr. Dan Groody While praying to God helped the Rutagengwas get through the genocide, Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said praying does not entail survival. However, God has a plan for everyone, he said.“We just listened to the teachings of our parents and the Church, and we were able to survive, and we thanked God for all He did for us,” he said. “However, we are well aware, aware that there are so many people who died in the genocide. It does not mean at all that they didn’t pray to God. I know they did.“My mother was a devout Catholic. She died. My father was. He died. Christine’s mother — she was Catholic. She died. And our siblings, they died. It does not mean at all that they didn’t pray to God. We don’t understand how God works. Some people die, others survive. In our cases, this is why we think we have a mission to be humble people, to show love, to spread the good word — maybe this is what God was telling us?”Christine Rutagengwa said the experience taught her to appreciate life.“The life we have is precious,” she said. “When you lose it, when it’s gone, you can’t find it. But material things — we lost our houses, we lost everything, but we found them after. But we never found our parents. We never found our sisters and brothers. So life is precious, it’s very precious and you can’t replace it. That’s what I realized.”The Rutagengwas, whose daughter Fiona Rutagengwa is a freshman at Notre Dame, returned to Rwanda in December with a group including theology professors Fr. Dan Groody and Fr. Virgil Elizondo, as well as project coordinator for the Institute of Latino Studies Colleen Cross.“We were happy to go back, even if it was not easy,” Christine Rutagengwa said. “It was not easy because we saw the memorials, and it brought back bad memories.“To see people like Fr. Dan [Groody] care and show us love — it made us feel better. It cannot take away our pain, but it’s kind of very good for us. When people care, they are not maybe many, but they are people who really care, who were able to see what happened to us. I really loved that experience I had with friends from the [United States]. It was a blessing to go there with them.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said the trip had two purposes.“Fr. Dan [Groody] had the idea to go to Rwanda,” he said. “We wanted to show our friends what happened to us, because we wanted [them] to know and understand what happened to our family.“In Rwanda they built memorials for the victims of the genocide, and some of our family is buried there … and the motivation to go there was to honor their memory, to go there and say some prayers for them, being surrounded by some of our friends from the [United States].”While in the United States, Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he channels his mission into helping other survivors of the genocide come to terms with what they experienced.“When I moved to the [United States] in 2000, I devoted my time to supporting FORGES [Friends of Rwandan Genocide Survivors], an association created by Rwandan survivors living in New England,” he said. “For the last several years, I have organized in Boston with other FORGES members the annual commemoration of the genocide of the Tutsis, which takes place every April, and I have spoken at different events aimed at fighting the genocide ideology.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said his advice to people facing difficult situations is to hold onto faith.“Life is full of distractions, especially for young people, and whenever life issues arise, many forget that God is the answer and revert to their habits and distractions,” he said. “Putting God before everything is the only way to be happy and to be at peace. But it’s easier said than done. It requires sacrifice; it requires discipline; it requires humility.“But at the end, it saves lives.”Christine Rutagengwa said she and her husband still wonder why they survived the genocide and others did not, and they pray to God for guidance constantly.“We’re always looking, praying and asking God, ‘Why? What do you want me to do? What are the lessons you want me to give to the people who don’t know about or happen to ask? We know you are real. We know you are there,’” she said.“That is a kind of question we don’t know how to answer. We are trying. Maybe one day we’ll find out.”Tags: Rutagengwas, Rwanda, Rwandan Genocidelast_img read more

first_imgMargaret Morgan, rector of Howard Hall, gave a talk titled “Reconciliation: Why Should I Seek It?” Wednesday night at Legends as part of Campus Ministry’s Theology on Tap series. The lecture focused on what reconciliation means, the differences between reconciliation and forgiveness and why reconciliation is important in every day life.“A life without reconciliation is self-isolation, moving farther and farther away [from other people],” Morgan said. “Changing our lives due to annoyance or hurt, cutting ourselves off from people.”Morgan said this reluctance to open up to others is natural for everyone.“As humans we can relate to that. We do this all the time,” Morgan said. “If I have learned anything as a rector or as a teacher, it is that we are a conflict-averse people. … We are a honest communication avoiding people.“We love to talk about ideas, movies, sports, “The Bachelor,” “The Bachelorette,” but we don’t like to say how we feel to one another. Specifically, we don’t like to say how we feel to one another when that person is sitting in front of us.”The importance of reconciliation is preventing this distancing of ourselves in a relationship with God, Morgan said.“A fundamental belief in the Christian faith is that God created me to be in relationship with God. … When I mess up in my relationship with God, I have a choice,” Morgan said. “I can ask for forgiveness or I can start to pack up my things and be okay with moving a little further away from God.”Morgan said people often question the sacrament of reconciliation because they don’t realize the bearing it has on one’s relationship with God.“Oftentimes I hear the question, particular about reconciliation and the sacrament of confession,” Morgan said. “People say, ‘Why do I have to go to confession? Why does it have to be a sacrament?’. … It is not just saying you are forgiven, but that there is a relationship that is restored in this moment and that happens in this moment of reconciliation.”Forgiveness, however, is not the same as reconciliation, Morgan said.“We often forget that and put those two things together,” Morgan said. “[Forgiveness] is often an intimate and private journey. It doesn’t require working or sitting with another person. The journey to forgiveness is its own story and one that is required before you can reconcile, but it is still its own story.”In order to reconcile with others, we must first look past the person’s mistake, Morgan said.“We have to surround ourselves with the memories of that relationship,” she said. “We have to remember who this person is, we have to remember who we are and the context of this person. … We have to remember that people are people and often there is more to them than a simple mistake.”Morgan said the sacrament of reconciliation is ultimately important to repair our relationship with God after having made a mistake.“God has reconciled himself to us and now we must reconcile ourselves to God,” Morgan said. “We need the physical signs to do that. We need the help of a community. We need to feel the emotions that go along with working up the courage to say we’re sorry, of admitting to ourselves ⎯ as well to Christ ⎯ what we’ve done wrong and the most important thing we need in the sacrament, is to hear someone say to us, ‘You are forgiven.’”Tags: Campus Ministry, God, Howard Hall, Margaret Morgan, Reconciliation, Sacraments, Theology on Taplast_img read more

first_imgLooking for off-campus housing? The search just got easier with South Bend Student Housing, a new website created by six Notre Dame students in the Engineering, Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Masters Program (ESTEEM). The website makes finding residences, contacting land lords and securing listings faster and more convenient.Graduate students Keith Marrero, Amanda Miller, Conor Hanley, Eric Tilley, Nathan Higgins and Sean Liebscher are the co-founders of the website and business South Bend Student Housing, which went live in February. “It’s kind of like Amazon,” Marrero said. “You tell it what you want and it’ll tell you what’s available that meets your needs, and then you’re able to make an informed decision based on that.”Marrero said the website allows students to browse housing options in the South Bend area based on amenities and preferences. “One of our goals is to provide information for students about everything that’s available because a lot of students will hear about their housing through word of mouth,” he said. “You don’t really know everything that’s out there.”Although the co-founders are still in the process of contacting landlords and adding additional listings to the site, Marrero said the site already contains numerous housing options available for browsing. Students interested in a property can simply click the “Contact Landlord” button to email the owner directly. The website includes additional features such as a compare option. “One of our big features is the compare feature,” he said. “It enables you to compare three, four, however many properties you want on one page as opposed to having a million tabs open.”Marrero said there are means of comparison between properties to see if they include various features such as off-street parking or in-unit laundry. The distance from the residence to the University is also included. The website is especially helpful for graduate students who travel from various areas around the country and world and are likely unfamiliar with the South Bend area and housing options, Marrero said. The website first started out as a class assignment, but Marrero said the interviews the team conducted for class showed such positive feedback that students began asking when the website would go live. After deciding to make the project a reality, Marrero said the team received funding from an anonymous investor for the entrepreneurial venture. A beta site was created last fall and advertising through social media started in February. Students interested in learning more about off-campus options can visit the website southbendstudenthousing.com for more information. Tags: ESTEEM, South Bend Student Housinglast_img read more

first_imgGrace Tourville Former resident of Walsh Hall and mayor of West Hollywood Lindsey Horvath speaks to students on her wide-ranging career including stints in activism, advertising and city politics.The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy, the Gender Studies Program and ND Votes 2016 sponsored the lecture, titled “From Walsh Hall to City Hall.”“I am here to share with you that a degree in the Arts and Letters program is profitable. But more importantly, you can use that degree to make a difference,” Horvath said. “I had opportunities here that I would have never had anywhere. Here, we were able to talk about different issues, not only from an academic perspective, but from a values perspective. They really helped me understand how the lessons I was learning in the classroom can be applied to my real life.”After graduating from Notre Dame with a B.A. in political science and gender studies, Horvath worked in the entertainment advertising industry.“I was worried that I was contributing to the kind of culture we always discussed in my gender studies classes,” she said. “I was worried that I wasn’t contributing enough.”After moving to California from Los Angeles and beginning her career in creative advertising, Horvath said she met the mayor of Los Angeles while co-founding a local chapter of the National Organization for Women.“I knew from a very young age that I was called to be of service,” she said. “The government and law — that’s how I wanted to make a difference. I felt that I could use that to make a difference.”Horvath worked on multiple local commissions after serving a short term on the West Hollywood city council after receiving an appointment through a special election held among the other council members. At the end of her special term, she ran for the position in the 2011 election but lost. She continued to grow her career in entertainment by working at a tech startup in Los Angeles and starting her own advertising company.Horvath said during this time, she considered herself an activist and was very involved with her local community.“During that time, life was not very centered, not very balanced,” she said. “I didn’t know where I was going. My friend, the mayor, came to me saying ‘I’m not going to seek re-election,’ and I worried because she was the only woman on the city council. So I asked her, ‘Who is going to run?’ And she said, ‘You are.’”Horvath said her friend’s encouragement prompted her to once again run for city council. The West Hollywood city council elects its mayor, and on March 3, the same night Horvath was elected onto city council, she officially became the mayor of West Hollywood.Horvath said her policy focuses on helping the most marginalized sections of society, including LGBT homeless teens. She prides herself on bringing what she calls “new ways of thinking” to the political community.“Throughout that process, I came from someone who was outright rejected, to someone who was embraced by the community,” Horvath said. “Statistically, it’s proven that women needed to be asked about nine times before they consider running for office. So for the women in the room, consider this the first time you’re being asked.”According to Horvath, more than 50 percent of West Hollywood’s residents are less than 40 years old, but she is the only member of the city council that is under 40. She tries to encourage young people to get involved with the local government by creating task forces that younger generations can be involved with.“A new generation of leadership isn’t just important — it is essential,” Horvath said. “It is essential for the way our society works. Our generation has so much to offer. I see the potential for this generational divide to tear us apart — that’s one of the reasons that I want to create age-friendly communities.”Horvath encouraged all students to follow their passions, attributing her current to success to the passions she discovered at Notre Dame.“Pursuing your passion is always worth it. I worked hard [at Notre Dame], and here is where I learned how to be myself and that’s exactly how I am able to do the things I do,” she said. “Letting people know who you are and what you’re about not only helps other people figure out who they are, but helps you better understand who you truly are.”Tags: Arts and Letters, city council, Hollywood, mayor, West Hollywood Notre Dame alumna Lindsey Horvath has been called to do many things since her graduation from the University in 2004. Horvath, who spoke at Geddes Hall on Monday, has been an activist, an advertising executive and, now, a mayor over the course of her professional career.“You never know when you’re going to be called up to do the thing you’re meant to do,” she said. “But trust me, you’re ready to do the thing you are meant to do, no matter when you’re called to do it.”last_img read more

first_imgPolitical scientist, writer and libertarian Charles Murray spoke at McKenna Hall on Tuesday afternoon on the themes in his book “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.” The event was sponsored by the undergraduate minor in constitutional studies, and professor of political science Vincent Munoz opened the event by stating the purpose of inviting Murray to Notre Dame, as Murray is widely considered to be a controversial figure after co-writing “The Bell Curve” in 1994, which argues that genetics at least partly determines economic and social success. Michael Yu | The Observer The undergraduate minor in constitutional studies sponsored a lecture by libertarian, political scientist and writer Charles Murray at McKenna Hall on Tuesday, discussing political climates.“The University believes in the pursuit of truth and the protection of freedom of speech,” Munoz said. “Please know that the event is meant to further the purposes of the constitutional studies program, [which is] thoughtful dialogue in which people of good will listen to one another.”Murray holds degrees from both the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard. Within his first seconds of speaking at the podium in McKenna Hall, four people in the audience stood up and walked out together.Murray started his lecture by sharing his ideas on the forces that gave rise to the unexpected victory of Trump.“You have a working class — especially a white working class — that exhibited last year both a great deal of anger and … a great deal of demoralization,” he said. “On the other side, you had in this case a democratic elite … an elite that is isolated and that also exhibits a certain amount of disdain from mainstream America.”Regarding the white working class, Murray cited it as something that “seemed to be an unmitigated good.” He said in the 1950s there was a revolution in the way colleges recruited students.“Elite colleges started to reach out to much greater parts of America and draw in students who had not been drawn in before purely on their academic ability,” Murray said. “This is a good thing.”Murray used his alma mater, Harvard, as an example, and said in 1952 the average SAT verbal score was 583 and in 1960 it was 678.“In non-statistical terms, what it means is that Harvard went from a place with a lot of rich kids, some of whom were smart, to being a place who had very many very smart kids, some of whom were rich,” he said.Murray said when you bring a bunch of people with very high IQs together they “form a critical mass.” Because of this, he said, the value of brains in the marketplace skyrocketed.“You not only had a situation in which the higher education establishment over the last half of the 20th century, those people upon leaving were making lots more money,” he said. “The combination of money and spatial concentration produced a new upper-class culture.”Murray said the new upper class came with the inception of a new “bubble,” a new upper-class culture that was distinct from the rest of “mainstream America.” In an effort to help his readers determine whether or not they existed in this bubble, he created the “Bubble Quiz,” which consisted of 45 items and was scored from zero to 100 points. The fewer the points a person scored, the thicker the new upper-class bubble they lived in.The quiz contained questions related to the demographics of the neighborhood one lived in, if they had ever lived below the poverty line, the types of jobs they held in the past and more. Murray said he collected 140,000 scores, along with the zip codes people lived in now and the zip codes of where they lived when they were 10. He said he found a correlation between participants’ scores on the bubble quiz and the socioeconomic status of their zip code at age 10.Murray said the election was the end of America as a “creedal country,” creedal referring to the fact that America had a creed that was universally held.“Egalitarianism in the sense that Americans were not supposed to get too big for their britches,” he said. “Americans were not supposed to think they were better than other people just because they had more money.“What the election of 2016 revealed … is that those … democrats — after they came over to the right — were not absorbing the ideals of limited governments and the American creed. They had pretty much dropped out of those, too, [and] they were joining the right largely because they were so irritated with the people on the left.”The rich and powerful tend to be clustered in the same areas, specifically New York, Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Silicon Valley, Murray said. However, he said, a better way of living would be to “be in the midst of other people who are dealing with the stuff of life.” He said one should not live in a wealthy area just because they can, but rather, to strive to find a neighborhood that is not filled with all like-minded people.“So I guess what I’m saying to you who, many of you will become a part of this new upper class, don’t forget that option,” He said. “To live in touch with people who are engaged with the stuff of life in a very traditional American way and maybe you, too, will love it.”Professor of anthropology Agustin Fuentes delivered the response to Murray, as well as his own critiques on “Coming Apart.” He said while he agrees with Murray’s points on inequality having increased dramatically and social and spatial differences between classes growing farther and faster, he notes some fallacies in Murray’s book, specifically the flaws in what Murray describes as the “American Project.”“The American Project that Mr. Murray outlines is one where the continuing effort begun with the founding of the U.S. to demonstrate that human beings can be left as individuals and families to live their lives as they see fit,” Fuentes said. “Not everyone from the very founding — and in fact most — were not left free as individuals and families to live their lives.”As examples, Fuentes cited slavery, voting rights and women’s rights as barricades of freedom. From the founding, he said, the American Project failed from the get-go.Fuentes then refuted Murphy’s claim that people grouped by gender, ethnicity, age, social class and sexual preference will produce group differences in outcome due to cognitive, psychological and behavioral genetic differences.“The reductionist determinism, the almost apartheid-esque concept underlying Murray’s positions has no support with biological and anthropological sciences,” he said. “In fact, it runs counter to the rich and diverse bodies of scholarship, and yet, Murray seems to think — or rather hope — that the differences at the end of the day are deep-rooted in our human natures and reflect cognitive hierarchies rooted in our biology.“He is wrong. The American Project Murray pines for nostalgically, and with interesting stories, is not a reality. And it never was.”In order to deal with increased inequality and injustice in America, Fuentes said, one must not rely on false assumptions or assertions.“It must be about trying to work with real science and the real complexities of history, and inequity combatting ignorance and bias and seeing what we as a diverse, complex and occasionally justice-seeking nation have done and can actually do,” he said. “The assumptions and assertions underlying ‘Coming Apart,’ despite the quaint stories you just heard, are unsupported, unscientific, simplistic, myopic, gender-driven propaganda and we cannot take them seriously.”After Fuentes’ response, the event concluded with a question and answer session where the audience could send their questions in electronically. Senior Candace Thomas asked Murray about his thoughts on white privilege and whether or not he thought white people were born with advantages in life.“Depends on what white people you are talking about,” he said. “You’d have a hard time going down the road to rural Indiana towns in the south and going there, talking to white folks there and convincing them that they are privileged. So, do I think that there is such a thing as being white in this country independent of all other factors is this privilege thing? No, not really.”Murray then addressed another question on why the new upper class was overwhelmingly liberal. He said there was an orthodoxy on campuses and that for most of the 20th century it was tilted left, but that it has recently gotten more pronounced.“What we are in the process of seeing now is the simultaneous strength and increasing adamancy of the orthodoxy of the social sciences at the same time that what is going on in the hard sciences will — in another 10 or 15 years — will have finished off the story in the following sentence,” he said.Murray said that story will not be revolutionary, and that the differences between men, women and ethnic groups will have a genetic component.“This will not be earthshaking,” he said. “In most cases it will be a validation of what most of us look around and see and take for granted and are not particularly bothered by. But, it will be a revolution in the social sciences.“So that I would say by 2025 to 2030 if you are a sociologist and you publish an article trying to explain the probability of being arrested by age 21 on the basis of the standard socioeconomic set of independent variables, that you will not be able to get it published anymore unless you’ve also incorporated what’s been going on in the hard sciences. This revolution is coming down the road.”At this point, Fuentes stood up to protest this claim, but Murray addressed him and said he just wanted to finish his sentence, and then he would give the floor to Fuentes.“I will say that when I hear the kinds of things you are saying about the state of knowledge on these fields that you are the one living in Never-Neverland,” Murray said to Fuentes.Fuentes responded by addressing the audience and said there was “an incredible body of data out there.”“Don’t take my word. Don’t take his word. Do the reading,” Fuentes said. “Look at the entire body, sociological, anthropological, population genetic, cognitive science literature. It is there, it is prominent. We have been researching this for over a century and it is clear.”Tags: agustin fuentes, Charles Murray, Constitutional Studieslast_img read more

first_imgThe Sisters of the Holy Cross are central to Saint Mary’s College’s history and identity. Every year, the College’s community comes together for Heritage Week to celebrate the past that created today’s Saint Mary’s.The Mission Committee, part of the Student Government Association and the Alumnae Relations Committee, runs Heritage Week. Senior Kayse McGough, student representative to the Alumnae Association Board of Directors, said heritage helps create the identity of a Saint Mary’s woman.“Heritage to me, in terms of Heritage Week at Saint Mary’s, is celebrating the history and mission of Saint Mary’s College,” she said. “We try to create a week that incorporates events that are very nostalgic of past Saint Mary’s traditions and events that speak to the mission of the College. The reason we have Heritage Week and the reason I think it’s important is because it helps us remember and define what it means to be a Belle through service and through remembering our alumnae and the foundation that they built for us.”McGough said being a Belle encompasses many different meanings, such as being compassionate and seeking justice for others. She said Heritage Week events, like a service event and a panel of alumnae speakers, emphasize these characteristics.“This is the first year we’ve incorporated a service event, which I’m very excited about,” McGough said. “We’re making tie blankets that we’ve had alumnae from all different clubs across the country donate fleece to us. We’re making the tie blankets for the South Bend community, for children’s hospitals and the South Bend homeless center.”The final event of the week reflects the community’s appreciation for the Sisters of the Holy Cross.“The last [event] is making thank-you cards for the Sisters” McGough said. “We always try to incorporate something that we can do to give back to the Sisters for all that they’ve given us, especially the rich heritage and history that we celebrate during Heritage Week.”Mission Committee co-chair Madeleine Corcoran, a junior, said in an email she has a great appreciation for the Sisters of the Holy Cross and what they’ve done for the community.“We are celebrating the people and faith that has built Saint Mary’s College,” Corcoran said. “The Sisters of the Holy Cross have built the strong foundation of our school that we call our home away from home and our community that we consider our second family.”Corcoran said the importance of remembering the College’s heritage includes remembering the Sisters of the Holy Cross and what they’ve done for the community.“These women have paved a path before us: a path of faith, strength and perseverance,” Corcoran said. “They remind us to be strong and independent, while staying true to our values and faith.”McGough said she hopes to continue to contribute to the heritage of Saint Mary’s College after she graduates. It is remembering this heritage, she said, that will allow the College’s continued growth.“Progressing as a college means that we have to build on remembering and celebrating our history and mission,” she said.Tags: Heritage Week, Memory, saint mary’s, Sisters of the Holy Crosslast_img read more

first_imgKodiak, Alaska — one of the only cities in the U.S. to generate almost 100 percent of its electric power from renewable resources — was celebrated for its environmental sustainability in a lecture Tuesday night in DeBartolo Hall.The lecture was presented as part of the 12th ND Energy Week, an awareness week hosted by ND Energy and the Student Energy Board that promotes education and discussion about energy sustainability.Darron Scott, CEO of the Kodiak Electric Association Inc. (KEA) said the city’s initiative to implement clean power began in the early 2000s. KEA is Kodiak’s locally owned and operated electric cooperative.A primary reason KEA decided to switch to clean energy was due to the economic stability hydroelectric power and wind power offered, he said. The price of diesel fuel is highly volatile, he said, which can prove costly.Kodiak’s local industries looking to keep the price of power low was a major proponent of the switch, he said.“We were getting a lot of pressure [to transition] from seafood processors and from the government facilities,” he said.Scott said the Kodiak community embraced the transition for its economic benefits. Because the electric grid on the island is isolated from other cities, the clean power initiative serves Kodiak exclusively.“The benefit from [the wind turbines] comes directly to the people on the island,” he said.Scott said while the project began as a largely independent, local initiative, he attributes part of its success to government funding.“[While KEA was] getting ready to put the project in motion, the state [put] out a big grant for renewable energy projects,” he said.Scott said Kodiak’s transition to sustainable energy was gradual. It began with the introduction of hydroelectric plants, then expanded to include three wind turbines. He said KEA was tentative about wind power at first because it is more challenging to integrate into a power grid.“We didn’t have any real data on how the wind turbines reacted in the [electrical] system,” he said.After gathering close data on its first three wind turbines, the company later doubled the amount to six, he said.Today, KEA generates 82 percent of its electricity using hydroelectric power and 17 percent with wind power, Scott said.Scott said since switching to renewable energy, Kodiak has seen immense economic benefits.“Just the wind turbines alone have saved about 14 million gallons of diesel for our town,” he said.The amount of diesel saved already amounts to more than the initial cost of the project, he added.“We’re nine years in — it’s already paid for itself,” he said.Scott said the project has also helped Kodiak make progress in combating pollution. KEA’s renewable energy has reduced the city’s carbon dioxide emission by 150,000 tons.KEA has plans to expand its renewable energy initiative even further, Scott said.“We’re moving forward with more dispatchable renewable power we can rely on, which is [hydropower],” he said.Scott said he believes it is possible for the U.S. to make a full transition to renewable energy in the near future.“This model — it should work,” he said. “ … The technology’s there.”Tags: clean energy week, darron scott, kodiaklast_img read more