first_imgCollege students ‘keep the faith’ Youth & Young Adults Rector Albany, NY December 7, 2011 at 11:24 pm Great to see what Richard Sloan is doing at Columbia! Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Members of the Episcopal Student Center at the University of Texas in Austin on a mission trip in New Orleans, Louisiana. Photo/Jewelz Jacobs[Episcopal News Service] College can be a daunting environment for students who want to stay spiritually connected as they learn to navigate a world away from home and their parents.But with a little initiative and research, students can find opportunities to deepen their relationship with God, with campus ministries that help them acquire tools to face the challenges they encounter as students.That is one of the missions of the Rev. Richard Sloan, an Episcopal chaplain who is working with students at Columbia University and Barnard College in New York City.“In the same way that fraternities and sororities build a community around social activities, the campus ministry builds a community of faith by getting students together in a small group to connect and build relationships,” he said.The Episcopal Church has about 325 campus ministries across the country, including a group of about a dozen students that meet weekly with Sloan for a chapel service on Sunday evenings and for lunch and a prayer service on Thursdays.Seeking out such opportunities of fellowship early can help students throughout their college years, said Peter Thompson, a Columbia senior from northern Virginia who is a member of the club and plans to be an Episcopal priest.“Take advantage of resources,” Thompson said. “Know what is out there for you. You get busy, and it’s harder to keep showing up, but if you have a community, it’s easier.”Finding a faith community was important for Betsy Wade, a Barnard College freshman from Seattle. Although she did not choose to attend Barnard for its Episcopal student group, she learned about the club online before arriving in New York and planned to join.“Most schools have a chaplain on campus, and they are great resources for students,” she said.The Rev. Glenn Libby has built a ministry that offers both group and individual experiences at the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles.During college, students are “allowed to explore and work towards something authentic. It’s about having the courage to make their faith their own and be bold enough to declare that,” said Libby, who also oversees all campus ministries in the Episcopal Church’s Province VIII.Although many campus ministries focus on group gatherings, such as worship services, Libby has found that “individual spiritual guidance” resonates with many students at USC and UCLA.How a campus ministry operates varies greatly from campus to campus, and it’s important that the Episcopal Church stays on top of cultural shifts and changing technologies, Libby said.Ecumenical outreach is also vital to a campus ministry, said the Rev. Ginger Grab, an Episcopal priest and member of the interfaith chaplaincy at Bard College in the Hudson Valley of New York, which promotes exploration of various religions, including Islam, Buddhism and Judaism.“We are providing a range of spiritual exploration, which can be a large part of the college experience,” Grab said.Parents have to understand that it’s OK if their child questions their faith; it’s a part of the learning process, she said.“I can’t assure them that their child will stay connected with their faith in college. Parents need to be tolerant, understanding and supportive as their child explores,” she said.The Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA conducted a study in 2008 to assess the spirituality of undergraduate college students. The study found that although religious observance decreases during college, belief in the “spiritual” increases.According to the report, which is based on data collected from more than 14,500 students at 136 colleges nationwide, 44 percent of the freshmen surveyed said they attend a religious service frequently. That percentage dropped to about 25 percent once they are in their junior year.But by junior year, more than 50 percent of students said “integrating spirituality in my life” was “very important” or “essential.” That’s nearly 8 percent higher than those students in their freshmen year.David Fierroz was baptized in the Roman Catholic Church but didn’t attend services growing up. And when he came to Columbia a few years ago from Southern California, his relationship with God wasn’t of great concern to him.It wasn’t until his senior year when he started to reconnect spiritually after a friend invited him to attend the Episcopal chapel service on Sundays.He and his wife, Crystal Oliva, were married by Sloan and still attend the Sunday services, even after both have graduated.“We’ve made friends and have found community here,” he said.— Elizabeth Paulsen is a Brooklyn-based freelance writer and member of Christ Church in Bay Ridge. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing GEORGE SWANSON says: Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Elizabeth PaulsenPosted Dec 7, 2011 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

first_imgHong Kong Anglicans serve society From gambling counseling to education Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 5, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Children attending St. Mark’s Church’s daycare in Macau. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Throughout its history, the Anglican Church in Hong Kong has been engaged in serving its communities through social services, education and other programs, with one of the best examples being St. James’ Settlement.What began in 1950 as a Boys & Girls Club in a room loaned by a Chinese temple in the Wanchai district of Hong Kong by 1963 had grown into a six-story building; by 1987 a 12-story building including St. James’ Church, a multi-service community service center and a primary school. Over the same time period from 1963 to 1987, the number of people receiving services, ranging from food provisions, education, healthcare services, daycare and elder care, grew from 164,000 to 700,000, annually.Today, St. James’ Settlement employs 200 social workers and serves more than 10,000 people daily at 47 service points on a $54 million annual budget. Having outgrown its current space and in order to expand its services, it is constructing a new $80 million, 13-story building on an adjacent property.Most non-governmental organizations providing socials services in Hong Kong rely on government support for 80 percent of their budget, said Chief Executive Officer Michael K.C. Lai, adding that St. James’ receives 30 percent from the government and raises the rest through fundraising, sponsorships and fees for service, with middle class people paying higher fees to subsidize services for the poor.“What a remarkable, holistic vision,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, adding that she hadn’t seen anything on that scale before.Josephine Y.C. Lee, St. James’ Settlement’s assistant chief executive, and Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori during a tour of St. James’ in Hong Kong. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonJefferts Schori toured St. James’ Settlement during a recent visit to the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, including Hong Kong and Macau, both governed as special administrative regions of the People’s Republic of China. The Province of Hong Kong was one stop on the presiding bishop’s three-week visit to Anglican Communion provincial churches in Asia, including the Philippines, Japan, South Korea, the Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan and China.The presiding bishop preached to a full house on the first Sunday of Lent during a service at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong Feb. 26.Established in 1998, the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui includes three dioceses and a missionary district – Hong Kong Island, Eastern Kowloon, Western Kowloon and the Missionary Area of Macau. Some 30,000 people worship in about 40 congregations and mission points, served by more than 70 clergy members.“We are working here quite well,” said the Rev. Peter D. Koon, provincial secretary general of the Hong Kong Anglican Church. “We are the third largest social welfare provider and the second largest education provider … that with 30,000 Anglicans.”In 2006 Macau, a former Portuguese colony, overtook in GDP per capita Hong Kong, a former British colony and an international finance center, for the first time ever as gambling revenue soared.The Macau government ended the territory’s gambling monopoly in 2002, which resulted in the number of casinos increasing from 11 to 34; fewer casinos than Las Vegas, but four times the annual revenue.“Before the casinos the best jobs were police and government jobs,” said Lee Kwok Hoo, a service director for the province in Macau. “But then they rushed to become dealers.”Out of the 160,000 households in Macau, one to two family members work in the casinos, he said.“Kids think they can get a job in the casino so they don’t study as hard.”In 2007, the province began providing gambling counseling and in November 2011, opened Macau S.K.H. Gambling Counseling and Family Wellness Center to address some of the societal and family needs that have resulted from gambling. The facility, which includes a daycare and recreation center, handles 250 cases with 18 employees and nine social workers. It also operates a hotline service that has received more than 2,200 calls.With a population of just over half a million people, there are six degrees of separation, said Lee, and most people prefer not to receive counseling face-to-face.Jefferts Schori, who was formerly bishop of Nevada, sympathized with the difficulty facing residents of such a gambling-focused area. “People in Nevada who have problems with gambling often leave because there are temptations everywhere,” she said, “… slots in grocery stores and gas stations.”In Macau, the presiding bishop visited also St. Mark’s Church, which was the first Chinese-Anglican congregation there, said the Rev. Odette Pun Oi-Kuan, the church’s 17th vicar, who is a native of Macau.St. Mark’s has a school, serving 2,000 students in K-12 and adult education, and runs a daycare center. And like the Gambling Counseling and Family Wellness Center, St. Mark’s serves families affected by gambling.“The Anglican Church is the only one that has Macau people serving families and casino workers,” Oi-Kuan said.The presiding bishop was joined in Hong Kong and Macau by Peter Ng, the Episcopal Church’s global partnership officer for Asia and the Pacific; Alex Baumgarten, the Episcopal Church’s director of government relations; the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop, and Richard Schori, the presiding bishop’s husband.–Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.En español: http://bit.ly/whpvxD Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Stuart Kenworthy says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Christopher Epting says: March 26, 2012 at 5:40 pm Started in January. Today, began 2 Samuel and Acts. Using Oxford Annotated NRSV with fine introductions and footnotes. It’s been a long time since I read the Bible through and am enjoying reading each book in its own integrity and context without skipping around. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Jerry Emerson (Christ Church Dover DE) says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY By Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 26, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 26, 2012 at 6:35 pm The church should be grateful for this Spitit-inspired initiative by Fr Marek Zabriskie. A very important and sacred enterrprise and endeavor. And so good for the Episcopal Church. Thank you! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC center_img March 26, 2012 at 10:45 pm On behalf of our church, St Matthew’s, Austin, I want to state clearly that the Bible Challenge is going well! Thanks Marek, for starting this, and Pat, for writing a comprehensive article. I believe this will be spiritually transformational for our parish. Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Sharon Kelso says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 26, 2012 at 6:36 pm We did this in a small Men’s Group last year. At the beginning we all thought no-way, however as we proceeded all the things mentioned above apply. We found ourselves time and again considering some basic principles like: “original Sin” “God’s Love” “a remnant” “the Law” “our pride”, etc. etc. As pointed out above, yes we Episopalians do feel biblically illiterate, but once doing this one realizes how much of our prayer book comes directly from scripture. Doing it in a small group, I think, really helps to keep one at it. I know I needed them to keep me going. Psalm 1:1 March 28, 2012 at 11:31 am On the website for Biblical Studies there is a guide for readings each day. It helps me to stay focused (I’m on day 87). It is, for me, a beautiful way to start my day and gives food for thought as well. I am grateful for the movement that got me back into bible study and reading. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal News Service] Thomas Butler’s days are busy and full; the Flourtown, Pennsylvania, lawyer is in and out of courtrooms, representing clients in commercial litigation lawsuits.But not before he’s met the Bible Challenge; to read the entire Bible in a year.“It’s a grounding for me each day,” said Butler, 65, a parishioner at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania, who started last January and is anticipating completing the Bible by Easter.Then he wants to start all over again.“Reading the Bible from cover to cover is like running a marathon,” Butler said during a recent telephone interview from his office. “Okay, you’ve accomplished it but what have you really done? My conclusion thus far is that there’s a lot more to get out of the Bible and a lot more to be gained by continuing to read the Bible.”Which is something he’d never considered until he attended a friend’s memorial service at St. Thomas Church in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania, on Jan. 26, 2011. The rector, the Rev. Marek Zabriskie, invited the congregation to join him in the Bible Challenge.“I’d never thought about reading the Bible before I heard Marek’s invitation,” he recalled. “It was a challenge which on that day struck me as something I wanted to do.”After starting with Genesis 1 he is nearing the Book of Revelation, and acknowledges it’s taken him more like 15 months, but says the extra time was well spent.“I used to get up maybe like everybody, rush around, jump in the shower, shave, get dressed, have a quick breakfast and do whatever I was supposed to do that day,” he said.“Now, I take a half-hour and read the Bible and think about it. I find I’m not rushing as much. It has given me a different context and background in which to view things that are going on in the world and in my life.”Zabriskie came up with the Bible Challenge in 2010 as a way to rejuvenate his own spiritual life.Like many busy clergy, “I was feeling spiritually and physically worn down after Christmas, after helping lead seven services in three days,” he said. He decided to challenge himself to read the Bible in a year.“After three to four days I found it so incredibly spiritually gratifying, that it felt like God put it on my heart to invite others,” he said. He sent an invitation to a few friends, then to church members and then to “those not in our church, who I play tennis with or socialize with and got the same response. I kept on promoting it. We had 50 people within 24 hours.”And the good news has continued to spread, nationally and globally. “Fifteen dioceses around the world are doing it; ten are in the United States,” he said. “There are 45 churches doing it now and many more going to start. I anticipate we could have members in over a thousand congregations by the end of this year.”The effort also led to creation of the Center for Biblical Studies (CBS), whose website notes that “many vibrant and growing churches share one thing in common-they have a strong commitment to reaching and reading the Bible.”“Reading the Bible on a daily basis will inspire many people to start new ministries, make important decisions and significant changes in their lives. It will give them strength and comfort as they face major life challenges and allow them to feel truly alive in Christ,” according to the website.The Bible Challenge (TBC) can be adapted for individual, congregational, and diocesan use. Although Zabriskie designed a one-year reading schedule it is adjustable for portions of the year, such as a Lenten series on the Psalms, or the New Testament, or a Gospel.Since its inception, the CBS board has picked up such supporters and advisors as Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, former Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Frank Griswold and biblical scholar Walter Brueggemann. People ages 13 to 93 in churches from England to Nigeria, Tanzania to Pakistan are participating.TBC encourages participants to read three chapters of the Old Testament, one psalm and one chapter of the New Testament each day. The readings can be downloaded on iPhones, iPads, Kindles, Nooks or CDs.Participants may start on any day they choose, using a variety of Bible translations, including The Message by Eugene Peterson and The Story by Zondervan as well as age-appropriate versions of the Bible, in order to reach all age groups, he said.They are asked to begin with Genesis 1-3, Psalm 1 and Matthew 1 on the first day, for example. A meditation posted on the website offers the context for group study: “Today is all about beginnings,” it says, including setting the stage for the creation story in Genesis and connecting it to the birth of Jesus in Matthew 1.Considering that “bridge” between the old and new testaments is one of the reasons Martha King, 66, a parishioner at St. Peter’s Church in Del Mar, California, in the Diocese of San Diego, joined TBC.King, a retired English teacher and current Sunday school teacher, is in her third year of Education For Ministry (EFM), a four-year theological education program in the Episcopal Church that includes Scripture study.“I like what I read in the sense of reflecting on the Bible as a whole,” said King. On March 22 she was on Day 81 of TBC, and had read Joshua 10-12, Psalm 68 and John 2.“There was a lot of conquering and tribal warfare and God bringing hail down and trapping the kings in their caves and Jesus throwing the moneychangers out of the temples. I can’t help but see a connection between the Gospel of John and the way Jewish people were tending their temple,” King said. “I definitely find myself more open to the lessons in church on Sunday.”TBC participants at Grace Church in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, started during Lent and are already noticing its effects, according to the Rev. Karl Schaffenburg, 55, the rector.“We’ve been a ‘Father Knows Best’ parish and [TBC] is empowering people to understand they’re called into ministries,” he said of the parish, which has an average Sunday attendance of about 128.“They ask questions they wouldn’t have asked in the past, are taking a deeper look at their own faith, becoming more thoughtful about it and more intentional in worship.”He adapted Sunday adult forums into discussion groups. It’s also drawn a handful of people from the community, non-Episcopalians “who frequently stay around for worship afterwards.”“We say that Scripture, tradition and reason are the three legs of our faith but we don’t spend a lot of time exploring them,” Schaffenburg added. “This allows us to explore, to understand why we believe what we say we believe.”The Rev. Merrill Wade, rector of St. Matthew’s Church in Austin, Texas, started two discussion groups to support TBC. About 50 people have signed up and are experiencing “a grand opportunity to talk about” scripture and understand it in a different way, he said.For instance, he says, consider the practice of temple sacrifice, including “grappling with the idea of a burnt sacrifice, of the priest as the butcher and the cook and the holy man, and getting a sense of what it was like to bring the animal to the altar,” he said.“You think of our lives — we have meatpackers who do it all completely out of our sight, most of us. It arrives as a gunky-looking thing with plastic wrap on it. Nobody prayed over it, nobody thanked the animal for giving up its life. At least in this (temple sacrifice) there was a sense of gratitude that the animal gave its life. Its throat was slit; it was killed, dressed, eaten. In some ways that seems more humane than what we do.”And tackling other questions: “Why is God in a constant conversation with Moses, but that doesn’t seem to be the case with Jesus? What does that say about the way all these texts we’ve woven together and the understanding that all of this was verbal dictation from God, yet Jesus had to go off by himself to pray?”The church, about five miles north of the campus of the University of Texas, has an average Sunday attendance of about 430.“We’re not solving problems, we’re learning about how misty the look-back is for us. That we just can’t possibly know what it was like to live in that world and how useful it is to stretch our imaginations.”Participants are seeing “how much distance there is between pre-monarchy Israel and the 21st century and Austin, Texas. This was a really different world, and they’re getting that,” he said. “The idea that the Bible is benign and God’s just speaking to us in a kind of fanciful way, the idea that the Bible is something easy to read and understand, that’s pretty well been stripped from their consciousness.”And then there’s that pesky belief that, despite four Scripture lessons weekly and a three-year lectionary cycle, many Episcopalians are biblically illiterate.The Rev. Paige Blair, 41, St. Peter’s rector, compares the encounter with TBC to living in Boston and taking the subway. “You can know the city like crazy by subway but … to actually find how it’s all connected on the ground really takes walking it, pounding the pavement.”“Our prayer book is replete with Scripture and … we hear a ton of it in church but it’s excised from its context” on Sunday mornings, she said. “We very happily cut and paste Scripture or have a lectionary insert so people don’t have to thumb through their Bibles” to recognize the connection. “It’s a bit unhinged from its incarnate reality, its 3-D reality in the Bible.”TBC gives people that context, added Blair, 41. St. Peter’s average Sunday attendance is 310 and all age groups are represented among the 40-some parishioners taking the Bible challenge, from high school students to retirees — even a couple of professors from a nearby Bible college.That’s in addition to the church’s three regular Bible studies. TBC participants are noticing a new 3-D reality.“Now they can see where the Decalogue rests in Exodus, where the Lord’s Prayer falls within the Sermon on the Mount and the Sermon on the Plain in Matthew and Luke, respectively,” she says.Blair said she is grateful to Zabriskie “that he heard the call to just try this himself and that he invited others to join him.“There are people in Pakistan, in the city where Bin Ladin was found, there are people all over the world engaging this wonderful journey because Marek heard the call of the Spirit and invited others to join him. That’s discipleship, right? This is a real gift.”—The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent with the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. The Bible Challenge: A ‘marathon’ of a read Effort to read Scripture in a year goes global The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (5) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Merrill Wade says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jun 26, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI El Seminario del Suroeste anuncia el lanzamiento de Educación Teológica Para Ministerios Emergentes TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Seminary of the Southwest] El Seminario del Suroeste anuncia el lanzamiento de Educación Teológica Para Ministerios Emergentes (ETEEM) programada para comenzar el 17 -19 de Octubre del 2013. ETEEM es un programa de certificación conjunto llevado a cabo en español por el Seminario del Suroeste y el programa del Seminario Luterano en el Suroeste.Diseñado para satisfacer los requerimientos de educación teológica para la ordenación, el programa de certificación trae a los estudiantes al campus en Austin, Texas cuatro veces al año durante tres años en sesiones intensivas de tres días.El Seminario del Suroeste admitirá a los estudiantes Episcopales con ETEEM, coordinará las prácticas de esos estudiantes y ofrecerá los estudios Anglicanos y el curso de política para el programa de estudios. El Programa del Seminario Luterano, habiendo ofrecido educación teológica alternativa por 10 años, provee el curso para el programa impartido por profesores doctorados de la facultad.“La educación teológica para lideres de habla hispana en nuestra Iglesia será enriquecida por la asociación del Seminario del Suroeste con el Programa del Seminario Luterano.Estoy seguro de que esto cumplirá con las necesidades de las personas que no han encontrado programas de grado tradicionales de seminario accesibles por las barreras del lenguaje, estudios cursados o el compromiso del tiempo,” dice el Reverendo Canónigo Anthony Guillen, misionero de los Ministerios Hispanos/Latinos para la Iglesia Episcopal. “Me complace que la Oficina del Ministerio Hispano/Latino estará trabajando con el Seminario del Suroeste y recomiendo altamente ETEEM’.Los solicitantes deben tener el permiso y la carta de apoyo de su obispo para aplicar a ETEEM. El Reverendo Paul Barton, PhD es director de ETEEM y profesor de la historia del Cristianismo Americano y la misionología y director de estudios eclesiásticos hispanos en el Seminario del Suroeste. La información para entrar está disponible poniéndose en contacto con [email protected] Seminario del Suroeste es un seminario Episcopal acreditado en Austin, Texas que ofrece grados de maestría para el ministerio ordenado y para las personas que buscan la educación y la formación para la certificación de consejería, capellanía y cuidado pastoral, la formación espiritual y la religión. El profesorado titular de tiempo completo enseña los cursos teológicos centrales y más de 30 profesionales en el centro de Texas conforman el cuerpo docente adjunto de la facultad. El Seminario del Suroeste tiene 135 estudiantes de todo los EE.UU. inscritos en sus grados. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ read more

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Vivir en Egipto en medio de la revolución, las protestas y las nuevas oportunidades Entrevista con el sacerdote episcopal Paul-Gordon Chandler In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Posted Sep 27, 2012 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler[Episcopal News Service] El Rdo. Paul-Gordon Chandler es un sacerdote episcopal que vive en Egipto, donde ha servido, desde 2003, como rector de la iglesia de San Juan Bautista [St. John the Baptist] en El Cairo. En esta entrevista para ENS, Chandler reflexiona sobre los cambios ocurridos en Egipto a lo largo de los últimos dos años y habla acerca de las recientes protestas provocadas por una película de contenido antiislámico.ENS: Egipto ha presenciado algunas importantes transformaciones en los últimos dos años. ¿Cómo le describiría el panorama político y la infraestructura del país a alguien que en verdad no comprende el contexto?P-GC: ¿Por dónde empieza uno, respecto a lo ocurrido en Egipto durante los últimos 18 meses, para no hablar de las últimas semanas, o incluso de los últimos días? Cada día está tan lleno de sorpresas que resulta difícil estar al tanto de todo.Obviamente, después de más de 60 años de un régimen autoritario, y décadas de ser un Estado policial, Egipto está experimentando lo que podrían llamarse “dolores del desarrollo”. Sin embargo, hay que decir que, en las elecciones más democráticas desde 1952, los egipcios eligieron libremente a su líder, Mohamed Morsi, de la Hermandad Musulmana, que obtuvo el 51 por ciento de los votos. La famosa Plaza Tajir, estalló de júbilo cuando se hizo el anuncio. Muchos estaban jubilosos porque había ganado un promotor del islamismo conservador. Otros, no tan entusiastas respecto a esto e incluso preocupados respecto a la agenda de la Hermandad Musulmana, se alegraban no obstante de la verdadera victoria de la revolución.Uno de los mayores retos ahora mismo está relacionado con la infraestructura básica del país, para no mencionar los problemas económicos. Estos retos han empezado realmente a acumularse. Hay excesiva basura dondequiera, menos seguridad (la fuerza policial es mínima), la electricidad se interrumpe cada vez más, se encuentran menos medicinas en las farmacias, se cree que el trigo está por acabarse, hay escasez de agua embotellada, etc.Un respetado analista político de aquí describió bien la situación actual de Egipto con estas palabras: “Egipto atraviesa un estado de fluidez revolucionaria”.Sin embargo, en medio de todo, vemos muchas señales positivas que son decisivas para la salud futura de Egipto, y admitimos que debemos tener una perspectiva a largo plazo. De manera que estamos arraigándonos en Egipto e inmensamente orgullosos de los egipcios.ENS: ¿Qué significan estos cambios para el país en general, y para los cristianos en particular?P-GC: Los más preocupados con la victoria de Morsi fueron los cristianos coptos. Sin embargo, la preocupación se basaba en gran medida en el temor a lo desconocido. Lo que nos resulta familiar, incluso si es indeseado, siempre se percibe como más seguro. Comenzaron a propagarse rumores contra Morsi, y él no sólo trató de disiparlos, sino que durante su discurso de la victoria Morsi procuró apaciguar los temores de los coptos. “Nosotros, como egipcios, musulmanes y cristianos…enfrentaremos juntos los conflictos y las conspiraciones que amenazan nuestra unidad nacional… Todos tenemos iguales derechos, y todos tenemos deberes hacia esta patria”. Incluso él ha renunciado oficialmente como miembro de la Hermandad Musulmana luego de su discurso de la victoria. Sin embargo, algunos coptos no están convencidos, y creen por el contrario que el país ha sido objeto de una manipulación, lenta pero segura, [para implantar] un régimen islámico. ¡Egipto es un país de rumores!Una de las primeras decisiones del presidente Morsi fue invitar a los líderes de todas las denominaciones cristianas al Palacio Presidencial, donde los recibió amistosamente y les garantizó que los cristianos son ciudadanos iguales en Egipto y que es su deber [del presidente] de que todos los ciudadanos disfruten de sus derechos. El presidente también les contó relatos de la historia del islam y de cómo los líderes musulmanes tienen un vivo interés  en garantizar los derechos de la ciudadanía a todos los cristianos de Egipto. El presidente prometió hacer su mayor esfuerzo para garantizar los derechos de los cristianos, especialmente en lo tocante a la construcción de iglesias. Los líderes cristianos salieron de la reunión de 35 minutos muy estimulados.Y algo muy notable, el presidente Morsi invitó a los líderes de las denominaciones en Egipto a reunirse con él el mes pasado, por segunda vez. Dos veces en menos de dos meses para hablarles y escucharles. Eso no había sucedido en Egipto en los últimos 30 años. El presidente Morsi les garantizó que su fe islámica le exige ser amable y justo con las personas de otras fes. Ellos se fueron de la reunión muy animados y determinados a hacer lo más que pudieran para llegar a ver el Egipto con que todos sueñan.Donde yo trabajo, en la iglesia episcopal de San Juan, en el sur de El Cairo, las singulares oportunidades para el ministerio han crecido exponencialmente en este “nuevo Egipto”, con mucha más libertad religiosa que antes de la revolución. Pronto celebraremos nuestro Foro Abrahámico del otoño que congrega a cristianos y musulmanes en torno a un tema de importancia para el país. Nuestro orador principal es Jeffrey Fleishman, el jefe del buró de Los Angeles Times en El Cairo, [quien también es] novelista y finalista de un premio Pulitzer. Sin embargo, independientemente de la realidad, cada vez hay más cristianos coptos que desean emigrar. Con demasiada frecuencia persiste este temor intrínseco al “otro”.ENS: ¿Cuáles son las últimas protestas de El Cairo? ¿Quién protesta y por qué? ¿Son las protestas sólo una respuesta a la película antiislámica o se trata de algo más complejo que eso?P-GC: Sé de muchos que han seguido en la prensa occidental los disturbios que han estado ocurriendo en Egipto y otras partes del Oriente Medio como resultado de la oprobiosísima película que produjo un egipcio de origen cristiano que viven en EE.UU. y cuyo tráiler de 13 minutos se divulgó en YouTube.Nosotros estuvimos realmente muy seguros. La mayor parte de los disturbios estuvieron muy localizados, justo en los alrededores de la embajada de EE.UU. en el centro, y aunque empezó con un par de miles de manifestantes, se redujo rápidamente a un grupo pequeño. En algunos otros países, como Libia, Túnez y Yemen, las protestas han terminado con consecuencias más serias. Sin embargo, aquí en Egipto, ha sido hasta la fecha en gran medida una mezcla de diferentes grupos que quieren aprovechar la oportunidad de servir a sus propios intereses, ajustar cuentas y expresar sus frustraciones. En Egipto, los recientes tumultos no han sido provocados en su mayoría por los fundamentalistas islámicos, tal como lo refleja la prensa.En este sentido, el área de la embajada de EE.UU. cerca de la plaza de Tajir se convirtió en un campo de batalla para gente descontenta, y no sólo como una protesta contra la película. Según el respetado analista político y periodista egipcio Ayman El-Sayyad, “…la gente aprovechó la oportunidad para desahogar su furia”.En cuanto a quiénes son ese gente, bueno, es un grupo de lo más variopinto, todos con diferentes razones para manifestarse violentamente. El Sayyad lo puso muy bien: “Son…islamitas contra el gobierno de EE.UU.; revolucionarios contra las fuerzas de seguridad [egipcias]; salafitas [una agrupación islámica fundamentalista] contra la Hermandad Musulmana [que es mucho más moderada], y los marginados [es decir, desempleados] contra la realidad en la que viven”.ENS: ¿Cómo han respondido a las protestas el presidente y otros líderes políticos, dado su compromiso de construir una sociedad más democrática en Egipto?P-GC: Por suerte, el presidente Morsi, si bien ha condenado la deshonrosa película, también ha condenado enérgicamente la violencia de cualquier índole en las manifestaciones. Esta denuncia pública de la violencia ayudó a disolver un montón de otras posibles protestas violentas.Tal como lo reportara el New York Times, Khairat El-Shater, el viceconsejero de la Hermandad Musulmana de Egipto, dijo: “Nuestras condolencias al pueblo norteamericano por la pérdida de su embajador y de tres miembros de su personal en Libia”. Él a continuación resaltó que no hace responsable al gobierno de EE.UU. ni a sus ciudadanos por las acciones de “los pocos” que abusan del derecho a la libre expresión, no obstante su rechazo a esta película antiislámica. También condenó “el allanamiento a los terrenos de la embajada de EE.UU.” por los manifestantes egipcios, y describió el actual estado de cosas en Egipto con estas palabras: “Egipto atraviesa por un estado de fluidez revolucionaria, y la ira pública debe tratarse con responsabilidad y con cautela”.Luego, en breve, estamos a salvo y la gran mayoría de los egipcios sigue siendo en extremo magnánima en todo sentido con los que visitan su país. Si bien la prensa da con frecuencia la impresión contraria, nada podría estar más lejos de la realidad que experimentamos aquí.ENS: Algunas de las justificaciones para producir esta película en contra del islam se basan en el derecho que hay en Estados Unidos a la libertad de expresión.  ¿Qué pasa en los casos donde la libertad de expresión ofende a millones de personas?P-GC: Es muy difícil explicar el concepto de la libertad de expresión en un contexto como éste. El punto de partida global es completamente diferente que en la mayoría de las culturas occidentales. En una cultura de la vergüenza, que prevalece en el Oriente Medio, [en la cual] conservar el honor es la máxima prioridad. Las personas de distintas partes del mundo reaccionan de manera diferente, especialmente en lo que respecta a asuntos de fe.Una cosa interesante es que los cuatro obispos diocesanos episcopales/anglicanos enviaron recientemente una carta conjunta al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sugiriendo “que se negocie una declaración internacional que ilegalice el insulto intencional y deliberado o la difamación a personas (tales como los profetas), símbolos, textos y conceptos religiosos considerados sagrados por la gente de fe”. Su motivación al hacer eso es que creen que podría ayudar a evitar la posibilidad de más violencia, entre personas de diferentes ambientes culturales o filosóficos o entre feligreses de diferentes religiones.Ya crea uno o no que ésta sea la respuesta adecuada, muestra cuán seriamente los lideres de la Iglesia local aquí están tomando todo esto.[Los cuatro obispos son el Rvdmo. Mouneer Hanna Anis, obispo de Egipto y obispo presidente de la Provincia Episcopal/Anglicana de Jerusalén y el Oriente Medio; el Rvdmo. Michael Owen Lewis, obispo de Chipre y del Golfo; el Rvdmo. Bill Musk, obispo zonal para el Norte de África; y el Rvdmo. Grant LeMarquand, obispo zonal para el Cuerno de África.]ENS: Usted ha dicho que los que protestan no son sólo fundamentalistas islámicos. Pero en algunos países, las protestas incluyen en gran medida a personas asociadas con agrupaciones extremistas, ¿no lo están ellos, o es una distorsión de la prensa?P-GC: Para ser muy franco, el contexto de cada país es tan completamente diferente que resulta difícil responder con exactitud. Uno de los retos que encaramos aquí es que Occidente suele ver al “mundo musulmán” como un cuerpo monolítico, casi como si fuera una entidad política y religiosa. Sin embargo, los problemas de un país son diferentes de los de otro país, como son diferentes, por ejemplo, los problemas de EE.UU. de los de Dinamarca, vistos ambos como “países cristianos” en el mundo musulmán.ENS: ¿Cuán perjudiciales son las inexactitudes reportadas en la prensa?P-GC: Ante todo, no estoy seguro de que los medios de prensa occidentales estén distorsionando intencionalmente la situación. Lo más probable es que haya una falta general de comprensión a fin de presentar las noticias dentro del contexto correcto, y también que la naturaleza misma de los medios de comunicaciones se concentra en reportar la controversia, lo cual con frecuencia magnifica desproporcionadamente lo que ocurre. Como resultado, el daño hecho es que, basándose en la desinformación, se tiende a reforzar los estereotipos negativos de las personas en esta región.ENS: ¿Qué debe aprender el mundo a partir de esta serie de sucesos?P-GC: Yo creo que todo esto es un convincente recordatorio de cuan importante es para todas las personas (incluidos los de los medios de prensa) de ser responsables y ejercer autocontrol al expresar o promover opiniones insultantes o malévolas con respecto a la religión. En cambio, debemos concentrarnos en hacer la paz con todos los pueblos. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Joseph La FollettePosted Jul 9, 2015 People Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Obituary, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande] The Rev. Melvin Walker La Follette was born in Evansville, Indiana, in on September 7, 1930. He lived all of his childhood in Ridgeville, Indiana. His father, Melvin Lester La Follette, was an electrician for the local telephone company who lost his job during the Great Depression. Because of this, his mother, Genevieve Farr La Follette, found employment as the first grade teacher at the Grant County Elementary School. For many years, her guidance shaped young Melvin.After graduating high school in 1948, he then served his summers in U.S. Forestry Service. He became frustrated with his mother when she refused to grant him permission to join an elite band of men known as the smoke jumpers. He had to compromise with her and remain part of the ground crew. He assisted in the Mann Gulch Montana fire of 1948 where 13 smoke jumpers suffered a terrible tragedy. He reconciled with mother shortly after that event.The same year he was accepted to Purdue University until the Korean war broke out, and he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served as a member of the medical corps. He served in a recovery ward for men wounded overseas.After leaving the Navy, he received a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Washington. He then returned to graduate school where he attended the University of Iowa’s Writing Project. He received a Master’s Degree in Literature and Creative Writing. It was there that he was instructed by the poet John Berryman, who became an important influence in his decision to become a professional writer.To support his writing, he accepted a position at the University of British Columbia. There he was sought out by Dylan Thomas, a fellow poet, to be his guide in the Columbian Rockies. La Follette continued writing short stories and poems that appeared in Poetry Magazine, the Beloit Poetry Review. Dame Marianne Moore encouraged his modernist style, although some critics disliked his adherence to formal styles like the sonnet and the ballad, but he himself considered his work surrealistic because most of his poetry had deeper dreamlike imagery mingled with adherence to traditional writing styles. He believed that poets should not abandon tradition just for the sake of modernity.In 1957, he accepted a teaching position at the Oregon State University. It was there that he courted and married Alice Louise Simpson  in 1958, with whom he shared 26 years of marriage.He then moved to San Jose, California, where he continued writing poetry and co-founded a small short-lived publishing company, The Spensarian Press.While an instructor at San Jose State University, he attended The University of California doctoral program. There he made a close personal friendship with fellow poet Allen Ginsburg. He enjoyed listening to beatnik poetry on occasion, but La Follette preferred a formal style of verse for his own writing. He was also dismayed by the abuse of drugs that was passed off as part of the creative process. For this he penned Elegy To A Beatnik, a precautionary poem in free verse.In 1962, his son Stephen was born. At that same time, he felt a tremendous calling from God to do more for his fellow man. After being examined and accepted by a committee led by Bishop James Pike, he left the University of California without receiving his doctorate, vacated his seat at San Jose State University, and moved his growing family to New Haven, Connecticut.To support himself during seminary, he taught undergraduate courses at Yale and also worked as a hotel clerk. He also continued writing poetry and prose, although the majority of his time was spent studying in seminary. While at seminary, a second child Joseph was born in 1964.After being ordained a deacon in 1966 and later a priest in 1967, he was assigned as a curate at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Auburn, New York. His duties included a prison ministry, and chaplaincy at the local hospital.During most of his adult life, he was a member of the civil rights movement and worked to end discrimination against minorities. He joined in many anti-war and civil rights marches in Washington, D.C., while still a seminarian.He then returned to California where he accepted a position as associate rector of St. Francis Episcopal Church in San Jose. While participating in his duties, he came across ancient manuscript that had an intriguing story of a heroic enchanted wolf. He decided to write an adaptation, which he worked on whenever his creative juices were flowing.In 1971, he accepted the challenge of turning a storefront mission into a full-fledged church. He became the vicar of St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church in Santa Rosa, California.  Unfortunately, this position was plagued with obstacles, but despite these he was true to his word and secured land and financing for the growing parish.He tried to include an Hispanic congregation and seriously learned Spanish to start a ministry. Unfortunately, his diocesan leadership didn’t see eye to eye with him. He then considered a position in Ecuador, but he could not convince Alice to leave the United States.Meanwhile, after years of reworking his manuscript, he found to his dismay that his literary agent could not get any publishers interested in his unique manuscript. He was offered many writing jobs, but he was an artist and turned them down.At the same time, he had a falling out with his bishop and left active ministry in 1978 ,but not before finalizing plans to build the church.Being a talented educator, he secured a dream job at Chapman University as a PACE professor for the U.S. Navy. While instructing sailors aboard ship, he traveled the Pacific and Indian oceans. Although he was not active duty he was awarded an expeditionary medal for his work on the USS Midway during the Iran Hostage Crisis. He recounted that Iranian fighter planes tested the ship’s defenses, and at one point a rescue operation failed when it was shot down over Iran.In the 1983, he left his teaching job at Chapman University to be closer to his elderly father in Roswell, New Mexico, while he finalized his divorce to his wife, Alice. She finally had had enough of his absenteeism and when he offered to once again settle down, she recanted until she discovered it meant moving to the Philippines.While in Roswell he began attending St. Stephen’s, he began to rediscover his love of the ministry. The people of that parish gave him encouragement to seek another position in the Episcopal Church.Soon after he took a job at University of Texas at El Paso and began helping out in the Hispanic ministry at the Pro-Cathedral of St. Clement. He was offered the opportunity to fill in for his friend Father William Muniz.For Father Mel, the community that he served, the distances he had to travel, and the tremendous obstacles that he faced were all fair game.In 1984, he was installed as canon of the Trans Pecos. With that he became the circuit-riding priest of the Rio Grande. He enjoyed serving at St. Paul’s of Marfa, St. James of Alpine, and he especially enjoyed the parish of Saint John’s in Terlingua Ranch. He felt at home whether in an air conditioned parish hall or a tiny chapel crammed with sweating but happy people waving their paperback Prayer Books to keep cool.He also worked with the Diocese of Northern Mexico and provided opportunities to seminarians from Monterey to assist in Vacation Bible School. He held VBS in Ojinaga, Palomas, Lajitas and Boquillas Del Carmen.Every Christmas he provided a fiesta for the children of each and every parish, which included gift bags of fresh fruits and nuts, toys, household goods, clothing and a piñata hand stuffed by himself. When his white truck came down the road during Christmas time, there was a dash to the mission. He would get home early in the morning and then do it again.For a while he even rode a horse to some out of the way places, although he preferred riding in a rowboat. He had a growing ministry that had the rhythm of a living poem.Starting in 1985, he compiled a collection of poems titled, Tales From The Indian Ocean, about life on a ship during the Iran Conflict. Once again, he encountered friends lost under tragic circumstances and sought to preserve a part of their memory in poems.In 1988, he purchased a small travel agency in Presidio. He hoped to grow the business into a pathway for active retirement. But to his dismay, the way people book vacations was rapidly changing.In 1990, Texas A&M named him rural minister of the year. He was interviewed in many news articles and was the subject of two episodes of the Texas Country Reporter.In 1992, he tried to expand his role to rural development and helped a group of local farmers try to make a dairy goat cooperative. Father Mel was completely heartbroken when young shepherd Esequiel Hernandez was shot by U.S. Marines while tending goats. He traveled to Washington, D.C. one last time to demand justice.In 1998, weakness from the early stages of heart disease and arthritis prevented him from a more active role so the cooperative was dissolved.He retired to his trailer on a small tract of land. Some of his hobbies included poultry husbandry, bird-watching and horticulture. He continued to travel throughout the Caribbean in a small sailboat and second class train in South America.He continued part time in the ministry mainly serving the parish of St. Joseph and St. Mary in Lajitas, Texas.In later years he spent a significant amount of time writing an historical novel set in the era of the Republic of Texas. He insisted on finishing his book with a feverish pace because he knew he had congestive heart disease. Just weeks after finishing his manuscript, he called the paramedics when he no longer could tolerate his untreated condition.He passed away on July 4, 2015, in Odessa, Texas, of heart failure. He is survived by his brother James (Ruth), sons Stephen and Joseph (Erica), and seven grandchildren, Christopher, Christin, Jacob, Jason, Josiah, Leila and Leslie.A requiem remembrance will be held July 23 at Santa Inez Church in Terlingua, Texas. Diocese of the Rio Grande Bishop Michael Vono will officiate. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA RIP: Mel La Follette Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

first_img Scott Slater says: Louis Stanley Schoen says: Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 17, 2016 at 5:25 pm I applaud the Diocese of Maryland for turning its shame and sorrow into an impulse to strive toward the kingdom in an exemplary way. Having just mentored an anti-racism course in the parish, I know how hard it is to break through the shell of good will to probe the hidden fears. It is indeed painful, especially for those who did not know they were wounded and now find themselves vulnerable to others’ pain. It is not a matter of laying blame on those who went before us; it is, rather, a case of climbing out of, and perhaps filling in, the hole they — even unwittingly — dug for all of us. It is Tikkun. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI May 17, 2016 at 2:13 pm This is just wrong.. Forgiving the sins of our fathers is what I believe Christ would want. Passing the sins of our fathers on to future generations is not what He teaches. This is just wrong. The more you promote thuis the more it is remembered, the bigger it gets, the wound never heals, and hate grows. Conversation is not a healer, it is an opener. This is just wrong. Comments (29) walter woodson says: May 17, 2016 at 11:58 am As one who was there, it was a difficult but important conversation to have. The Diocesan Council, to which the resolution was referred, had already begun discussing the resolution at its last meeting before convention. There is already some strong support for reparation investment in the membership of the council. I am grateful to be serving in the Diocese of Maryland. Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Jim Steele says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Donald Heacock says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Doug Desper says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Frank Riggio-Preston says: Bill Alcorn says: Carl Cunningham Jr. says: Ronald Davin says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Frank Riggio-Preston says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET susan zimmerman says: May 17, 2016 at 8:46 pm It may make some people feel good to provide financial reparations to a minority, but I question just how much good it will do. The U.S. has been showering money on minorities for years and all that has been done is to increase dependency on other’s largess. May 17, 2016 at 5:14 pm This is brilliant. We need to discuss this and other cases of inhumanity and injustice by America. It’s never going to just go away. Bravo to the Episcopal church for continuing this conversation. Jim Steele says: Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Diocese of Maryland takes up reparations Dianne Crews says: Joe Prasad says: Natalie Black says: Tags May 17, 2016 at 7:46 pm …and discrimination against women for centuries? Forget the money, just step down……I wonder what ‘minority’ will lead all the other minorities…isn’t that what this is all about…you the ‘top’ minority…do all the other minorities know, which minority in the Episcopal church is leading you? Think May 18, 2016 at 6:11 pm This is forcing every episcopalian to give to the fund without question. This is a case of individual conscience, not convention decision The Rev. Blaine R. Hammond says: Rector Albany, NY Featured Events May 17, 2016 at 6:28 pm As a lay delegate at the Convention, and as a descendant of a Maryland slave-owning family, I approached this proposed to the payment of reparations as an atonement for the damage done that persists to this day to the community of slave descendants with very mixed emotions. At the end of the discussions around the proposed resolution, I found myself disappointed that it had been referred to the Diocesan Council and not approved as presented to the Convention. This first came to Convention in 2006, some 10 years prior. To me, this meager first step in repairing the damage made to both slaves and slave-owners is long past due and should be taken now. The referral to Committee simply adds another year of unjustified delay. May 17, 2016 at 6:50 pm This reminds me of the parable of the Good Samaritan. Forgiving is one thing but what about the injury that’s left behind? It’s so easy to ignore and walk on by when you’re not the one suffering. People are still reeling in pain from the effects of slavery, like it or not. Keeping this in the dark only prolongs the pain, causing sores to fester. Moreover, add the pressure of the systemic racism and oppression of this modern era and the damage becomes more serious. It’s amazing to me that there isn’t more hatred towards whites, but most of the violence and hatred seems to be directed inwardly, or towards the black community itself. Hurt people hurt people. This isn’t rocket science! These are human beings. Opening up and shining a light on the situation brings healing—as long as the resulting conversations and actions serve to right the wrongs, not just observe. I believe God is waiting for this generation to act. Rector Tampa, FL F William Thewalt says: Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA May 17, 2016 at 10:27 pm It’s not surprising that some who experience white privilege speak out against this proposal. It’s been pending for a long time (including in the Episcopal Church) but has never achieved the support needed from our dominant cultural group. The time for action has come – and passed – repeatedly. Let’s pray and speak encouragement to the Diocese of Maryland to set a new trend of action for justice, which would be most appropriately initiated by DFMS under the leadership of Presiding Bishop Curry! Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: May 17, 2016 at 8:11 pm You are absolutely right. I have followed civil rights from Jim Crow tell today. Name your reasons. Thing are much worse . Here in my community in the deep south we have a black mayor, Chief of police,district att, many judges on it goes. Maryland enjoy your pain. Rector Hopkinsville, KY May 20, 2016 at 9:20 am As a clergyperson in the Diocese of Maryland who sat at a table at Convention where the ethnic make up was 50% white and 50% African American, I can share that all of us were concerned this resolution had serious problems. Let’s begin with the fact that the clergy who proposed this financial reparation were 100% white – no people of color at all. One of the founding clergy members of the Union of Black Episcopalians sat at our table and shared that the UBE had not even been approached about this resolution prior to Convention. So, we have a resolution about financial reparations given to the UBE but the UBE was not even consulted? And the submitters were all white? The consensus at our table was this resolution epitomized white privilege in how it was handled.The Rev. Mike Kinmon exhorted us to see discomfort as a sacrament and to engage in the hard word of family, solidarity and love across privilege lines. This resolution, as written, is pandering to a “quick fix”, “just write a check” mentality – in other words, cheap grace.At our Clergy Conference, Bishop Chilton Knudsen spoke eloquently of the work of making amends as a person in recovery. She said something I believe needs to be heard in our diocese. She told a story of her own work in making amends to someone she realized she had taken advantage of in her past. She also admitted she attempted to dictate the terms of the amends but the other person caught her up short by telling her she didn’t have the right to dictate the terms of the amends – only the aggrieved party has the right to do that!We need to listen well to this bit of wisdom from our bishop! It is not up to a group of white people to dictate the terms of the amends to the black community. It is up to us to be quiet, enter into holy relationships across the lines of privilege (and that includes ALL lines of privilege in our society), and listen deeply to the aggrieved as to how the repairing of these damaged relationships can happen.This is hard and long term work. There is no “quick fix.” This is also how our Diocese and Church need to address the many other ways in which the abuse of power in service of privilege has benefitted the Church. We have only focused on the narrow spectrum of slavery which built our Church and ignored the enslavement of indigenous Americans and the Irish (both of which happened in Maryland). Let’s enter into the harder work of paying it forward and dismantling the many forms of privilege which are operating right here and now. Submit an Event Listing Kate Symons O’Bannon says: May 22, 2016 at 10:49 pm Th Rev. A. Scarborough makes the most sense to me. This is a most difficult and complex matter. Indeed slavery was unspeakably terrible, and we should always hold it in mind about race relations. Other ethnic groups, though, have suffered a great deal from the power of the white privileged class throughout our American history–Chinese, First Americans, Japanese (recall the unforgivable internment camps), women, LGBT folks, deaf, blind, handicapped of various sorts, and other groups in this great country. ALL should be considered in order to bring about total justice and especially RECONCILIATION. The deepest and clearest biblical command is for reconciliation.” That is our principal ministry and purpose as the church. I think it may not ever be attained by splitting groups apart as “good” and “bad,” and just having simple “justice” as the only goal.My best friend through three years of seminary in Virginia was an African-American. I vividly and sadly remember one instance in which we could not go into a local drug store near campus and sit down for a soda, having just been in Washington, DC, where no such problem existed. I had suggested we go in there for a soda, and Henry just turned to me, smiled, and said, “Charlie, you know I can’t go in there and sit down at that soda fountain with you.” (Wow!!)I served a black-and white congregation (MO–near Ferguson) for 24 years before I retired in ’96, had great relations with many friends there, and some experiences in places before where once I even pretty well had to move on, at a mission congregation (in W. TX) because I ate with black ministers in a public restaurant, in a ministerial alliance meeting–and I didn’t get backing from my bishop. Yet, I cannot agree with some of the views or tactics of the more radical “black lives matter” movement. I think they seem more interested in simple “justice” and not full reconciliation. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA May 17, 2016 at 2:29 pm Thank you for an accurate summary of the spirit of the convention. Now we go forward in love!center_img Comments are closed. Racial Justice & Reconciliation Curate Diocese of Nebraska May 17, 2016 at 5:42 pm One of the great gifts the slaves gave to their white masters was to do the manual labor necessary on plantations thus freeing white young people to go away to top notch schools and universities. A good pay back is now to provide the gift of education to descendants of slaves. Much of this has certainly already been done through schools and universities. More could now be done and the systems through which we can do this are in place. Black labor made white higher education possible, and now those who have benefited from that education are often in a position to return the favor. – Doug Carpenter, Birmingham Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing May 17, 2016 at 5:27 pm I couldn’t disagree more. Every time I see a confederate flag or a monument to the confederacy, I am reminded of the evil committed by America against black people. Every time I see Mount Rushmore, I am reminded of the desecration of the sacred land an the near genocide of native American people. When politicians like Donald Trump speak of building walls, marginalizing people like Muslims and using the language of white nationalist, I am reminded of the fact that America too often embraces white supremacy rather than condemning it. We have much to do to heal this nation. By M. Dion ThompsonPosted May 17, 2016 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 18, 2016 at 1:46 am Gifts are given voluntarily. There was nothing voluntary about what the slaves “gave.” May 19, 2016 at 1:57 am I am from India where I grew up in a caste based society; within the framework of same color, there is much discrimination that went on (and goes on) stemming from religious/social beliefs. I led a sheltered life, my friends came from different castes; I never experienced discrimination there that impacted me in any way. When I came to US and really experienced discrimination via “racism” and considerable hostility at times (from both Blacks and Whites), it was a new experience for me. Being a sensitive person, I felt it deeply. A few apologized but the damage was substantial. I have pondered over racism / casteism, read commentaries on such topics and realized that each one of us individually or collectively as a community have to go thru’ certain experiences for our own soul growth. What is wonderful in this day and age is that the society (US, India and other nations) has become sufficiently enlightened to have meaningful discussions and do something in terms of reparation. However, we should not let our guard down. Educated people can get “lost” like those who participated in the Spanish Inquisition, those who butchered Jews during WW II, etc. Let us not harbor ill-feelings nor allow guilt to run our lives. Douglas M. Carpenter says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ heather neil says: May 17, 2016 at 8:19 pm What about reparations for the Irish for the way they were treated when they first arrived here ?Note, money may be sent directly to me, and I will declare absolution.Also; “You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the LORD your God, am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me,” Slavery has been over for about 150 years, which should cover the 3 or 4 generations thing. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 2, 2016 at 2:14 pm The first African slave owner in America was Anthony Johnson in Virginia in the 17th century; who was himself a free black man. African tribes sold their own people into slavery. The blood of Americans during the Civil War cleansed our country of white responsibility….and black responsibility for slavery — a sin (ironically) that is still being practiced by people of color around the world. Those who were former slaves in the 19th century in America worked at improving their lives and sacrificed by relocating, laboring, saving, teaching, and denying themselves in order to be viewed as persons who are worthwhile and virtuous in their own right. No one in the U.S. today is a slave or a slave holder. The sacrifice of our ancestors has paid up the debts. The nation has invested untold trillions in 160 years to open doors for the descendants of slaves. The responsibility is now on them to sacrifice like their ancestors to improve their lives. It might mean relocating, family planning, deferred wealth, or other sacrifices, but the debt has been paid. The time has arrived to decide to have worth by their own personal responsibility and accomplishment long made available in this nation — and which is not available in many nations in Africa. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 18, 2016 at 6:09 pm I agree May 25, 2016 at 10:04 pm Let’s see, didn’t President Johnson do this with the Great Society. Oh no, he made them dependent Democratic voters. A once proud people who became dependent.We elected Obama so we would feel better and it seems he made it worse, so what are we going to try next? He became the great divider instead of the uniter. Even he say he regrets that but he continues with the same tactics. Sounds like some have a self image problem that they want everyone else to pay for. September 21, 2016 at 9:36 am I disagree with reparations. I am appalled that the Church has now gone into taking political positions with distribution of wealth and embracing the BLM movement. My BCP says that all people should be treated with dignity and respect. This perpetuation by liberal clergy who are very well paid with parishes struggling to pay their high salaries and full medical and full retirement benefits, while they tell us we should feel guilty for something that happened 140-some years ago. I wonder how many of these clergy are willing to give up half of their perquisites or salaries for reparations. Failures of this priest who tried desperately to install guilt and shame on this Convention Delegate was this. None of their arguments hold up. Neither Michael Brown nor Freddie Gray should be elevated as saints. Michael Brown had just robbed and assaulted a store owner and then assaulted him. For what? Cigars to fill his Marijuana Blunts with. (He certainly wasn’t stealing Bibles.) Then proceeded to assault a police officer. Freddie Gray sold drugs and had a weapon on him. He had been arrested over 30 times. All charges were dropped in both of these cases against the police officers. As long as the clergy of the Episcopal Church uses the False Narative of the martyrdom of criminals and being villipendious to any other groups it will not be Gods Truth but mans vanity. We paid for reparations as a society. Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society was over 20 trillion $. It obviously has provided a helping hand for those who wanted to take personal responsibility as individuals not collectivist.As long as anyone perceives themselves as a victim, that’s what they will continue to be. I was told years ago by an Episcopal Priest, that my works are justified by the blood of Christ. I don’t feel guilty for anything I had nothing to do with or did not approve of.I urge all who object to this process of racial extortion to go to your regional diocesan meetings on this subject and object to this. May 18, 2016 at 11:05 am Great discussion on the board. The discussion of “white privilege” is is a tough conversation for African Americans and Caucasians. Our history in the United States is like no other history in this country. I come from a family where the stories of slavery and Jim Crow are very prevalent and fresh. I am often amazed how a group of people can beat, hang, and seat to dismantle race of people mentally and physically from 1619 to 1970, and saw it as being the okay. I was born in 1973 and my grandparents 1911 and 1910. They often told me of their stories growing in in America. My grandfather often told me of the stories of his grandparents who grew up on Godwin Plantation in Greenville, Alabama. The slaves were not allowed to read or write on this plantation and they could not wear shoes. In my mind as a child I would often think, “These were some cruel people.” My grandmother’s, great grandfather, was a wealthy white landowner in St. Stephen’s, Alabama. She often tells of the story when her grandmother decided to leave her mother and her white father because she did not trust him after slavery. She did not know if the emancipation was true and feared that her father would subject her to a life of slavery once again. Ironically, her father was a wealthy landowner in the Episcopal Church, hence my family lineage to the Episcopal Church. This family (my white cousins) are still wealthy landowners today. Their wealth has tripled. I am glad this discussion is happening. I do not know the answers but I do know the dialogue is much needed. This is coming from a craddle, craddle, craddle, craddle Episcopalian. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Belleville, IL Jim Cutshall says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA May 17, 2016 at 6:24 pm How much has been collected for the Native Americans? Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Young protesters from the Baltimore uprising share their experience and hope to the Diocese of Maryland convention. Delegates began the work of what reparations for the sin of racism and slavery to determine what that might look like. Photo: Diocese of Maryland[Diocese of Maryland] At its recent convention, the Diocese of Maryland took the first of what could be many small steps to engage the issue of reparations and set aside money to help heal the centuries-old wounds of slavery.Though the resolution that anchored the conversation, known as “Reparations Investment,” was referred to Diocesan Council for further review, its appearance marked a beginning for the diocese. The eight sponsoring white clergy wrote in their explanation that the measure gave the diocese a chance “to set an example for the church at large and other congregations whose endowed wealth is tied to the institution of slavery.”The resolution (on page 20 here) called for the diocese to give “at least 10 percent of the assets of its unrestricted investment funds to the diocesan chapter of the Union of Black Episcopalians.” The final dollar amount could reach into the tens of thousands of dollars.The Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis, Missouri, noted in his addresses to the convention that the church and nation were in a “kairos” time ripe for discomforting yet potentially healing conversation.“The nature of creation is change,” said Kinman. “The nature of Christ’s church is change and that can be uncomfortable.”In the time since the Aug. 9, 2014, shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, Kinman said he also has learned that “discomfort is a sacrament.” That shooting, those of Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and others, along with the death of Freddie Gray last year after his arrest by Baltimore police, have fueled protests and given birth to the “Black Lives Matter” movement.The Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis, Missouri, addresses the Diocese of Maryland convention. Photo: Diocese of MarylandYet, discomfort around race is at such a high level that merely to say “Black Lives Matter” or put a sign with the slogan on church property can elicit angry responses and vandalism. A “Black Lives Matter” sign put up at St. Phillip’s Episcopal Church, Annapolis, Maryland, has been repeatedly torn down. Police have made an arrest in the most recent incident.Kinman used the healing of Bartimaeus to describe the evolution of his thinking as well as that of many others in the St. Louis area. In the story (told in Mark 10:46-52) Bartimaeus cries out for help and release from his pain and misery, in much the same way the African-American community did after Brown’s death.Rather than acknowledge the pain, the crowd tries to shut down Bartimaeus. Jesus responds by putting Bartimaeus in the center of things and letting him speak. This is what has happened in St. Louis, Baltimore, and other cities where communities have responded to the police killings of young black men, said Kinman. Those who had been pushed to the margins now stand at the center, giving voice to their anger and dictating the agenda.“I heard these voices and I found myself becoming profoundly uncomfortable,” said Kinman, who had to confront his own notions of “white privilege” and how it influences his actions. “There was nothing tranquil about what was happening. “The conversations and listening sessions that have resulted are attempts at destroying what Kinman called “the greatest heresy: The lie of us and them. It is the greatest barrier to God’s dream of the beloved community.”During one panel discussion at the convention, Baltimore protesters and some members of the Slate Project, a post-denominational Christian community, encouraged everyone to see Christ in new ways and to sit with the discomfort these new relationships may bring.This will require sincere and open conversations, a theme Maryland Assistant Bishop Chilton R. Knudsen noted in her sermon that opened the convention. The power of true and meaningful engagement across race, class and gender lines was embedded in the Pentecost story where, she said, the Holy Spirit gave us the power to speak to each other and be understood.Maryland Bishop Eugene Taylor Sutton underscored his call to confront the “unholy trinity” of poverty, racism and violence. “What would it be like if the Diocese of Maryland was known as a community of love?” he asked, challenging congregations and members to “encounter Christ and engage God in the world around us.”— The Rev. M. Dion Thompson is a priest in the Diocese of Maryland. The Rev. Anjel Scarborough says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 3, 2016 at 10:41 am In early 2000s, an African friend, an immigrant from Nigeria mentioned that some African Kings became quite wealthy thru’ slave trading. (That’s when I realized that history learnt in high school was not quite OK.) This friend added that he was not aware of African Kings / descendants apologizing for their participation in the slave trade. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Rev. Charles H. Morris, D. Min. says: The Rev. Dr. Linda M. Maloney says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 17, 2016 at 6:16 pm Bill Alcorn sums it up nicely. Dangerously divisive. Ellen Gifford says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 January 15, 2017 at 11:31 pm Well-said! I very much agree. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Dan Tootle says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Joe Prasad says: May 18, 2016 at 3:15 pm Interesting that this initiative is introduced about the time of Pentecost in which we are commanded by Jesus Christ to go into all the world and preach the gospel… I don’t see an evangelistic component to this initiative. There must’ve been thousands of malnourished, slaves, and abused people at that time. I urge the initiators to look on our fields white unto harvest. TEC is declining, suicide rates among young people are escalating way out of bounds (especially for young women) and drug use is at pandemic levels. Where is our hearts? Why are we given the Holy Spirit in baptism? How does this enable the local church to bring young people of all races into the church?last_img read more

first_img Rector Bath, NC Africa, February 16, 2017 at 1:18 pm Just an aside, at least 620,000 Americans died in the War Between the States, and many more maimed and injured for life. Miserable prison camps, limbs severed without anesthesia, American’s homes and crops burned totally awful, . Probably should include the death of Abraham Lincoln also. They paid the price for this great sin in America, a sin that in many ways was inflicted by Europe on America. The travel junket of the Bishop was nice but in a larger sense the brave men who died to end this miserable time in history have contributed far more than our ability to add or detract. Far more than the Bishop’s trip. (Apologies to President Lincoln) Would that the whole Gettysburg Address be read in our Churches and a day of thanksgiving for those who gave their lives during this period be declared. Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion, Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books February 20, 2017 at 8:38 pm Is this a message that you would deliver by reading it in person to a large and diverse group of African Americans? And, may I ask, is this a message on the subject-at-hand that Christ himself, who in his always omniscient presence knows full well about about, would give, himself, on the matter?May I count you as among those who have left the Episcopal Church? I hope not, but this dialogue is entirely detached, IMO, from God’s message and commandment of love. Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ghana Pilgrimage, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Lynette Wilson Posted Feb 16, 2017 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rudolph Rassendyll says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC From left, Pilgrim Constance Perry, a former Episcopal Relief & Development board member, and Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Gayle Harris cross in front of the Presbyterian chapel in the courtyard of Elmina Castle. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Accra, Ghana] Most Episcopalians and Americans know the United States’ history of slavery, and how Union and Confederate soldiers fought a bloody civil war opposing and defending it. But lesser known is the horrific story that preceded slaves’ journey to the New World; a journey that carried them from Africa to plantations and cities in the Americas and the Caribbean.In late January, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry led a reconciliation pilgrimage for bishops and Episcopal Relief & Development friends and supporters to Ghana. The pilgrims visited cities and sites critical to understanding the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and Episcopal Relief & Development partners and programs working to improve Ghanaians’ lives. It was a pilgrimage that the presiding bishop described as akin to going home.“I was really thinking of it as a kind of ‘homecoming’ for me as an African-American, as someone born and reared in the United States. Whenever I’ve come back to Africa, whether east, central or west, I’ve often had that strange feeling like I was coming to a land that knew me before,” he said, while standing in the courtyard of Elmina Castle, a castle built by the Portuguese in 1482.“But this time, knowing we were coming to the place of [initial] enslavement, of embarkation, where the slaves began their journey through the middle passage … knowing that was like returning to the roots of who I am. And when you go back to your roots, you’re really going home.”From left, Anglican Diocese of Tamale Bishop Jacob Ayeebo, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, and retired Bishop of Tamale Emmanuel Arongo share a laugh during a service at St. James Anglican Church in Binaba, a church built by a United Thank Offering grant. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFrom Accra, Ghana’s capital, the pilgrims flew north to Tamale and boarded a bus that took them further north to the Upper East Region, where they spent a morning walking the paths of Pikworo Slave Camp, the same paths walked by an estimated 500,000 enslaved people between 1704 and 1805. Newly captured slaves from Mali and Burkina Faso were brought to the camp where they were chained to trees, where they ate one meal a day from bowls carved into rock, and where the process of stripping them of their humanity commenced. Slaves were marched from Pikworo 500 miles south to one of 50 castles on Africa’s west coast, 39 of them in Ghana, where they were held in dungeons, standing and sleeping in their own excrement, before their captors loaded them onto ships bound for the New World. The pilgrims traced that journey, as well, flying back to Accra and boarding a bus bound for the coast.“In so many ways this pilgrimage has birthed reconciliation for those of us who participated as we’ve been reconciled with one another and been formed in beloved community,” said the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, the canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation. “Reconciliation with our history and with the slave trade and the ways that so many were implicated in it and suffered because of it, and reconciliation because what we’ve seen through the work of Episcopal Relief & Development, that history does not have to define the way as we as church show up today in Ghana and around the world.”Captured Africans from Mali and Burkina Faso were held at Pikworo Slave Camp in Ghana’s Upper East Region before forcibly marched to the dungeons of one of the many castles along the Gold Coast. Here Aaron Azumah, a guide at the camp, demonstrates how slaves were bound and made to sit on punishment rock. If they didn’t show regret for their transgression, they were left to die in the hot sun. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Church of England and the Episcopal Church were complicit in the slave trade, with many Episcopalians owning slaves and profiting from the slave trade and its ancillary trade in raw materials – rum, sugar, molasses, tobacco and cotton. The “middle passage” worked as a triangle: Ships sailed from Europe with manufactured goods to Africa where the goods were exchanged for slaves that were captured in other African countries. Those slaves were sent to the Caribbean, where some worked on plantations; others were taken to North and South America along with sugar and molasses, where they were again sold. Ships then carried commodities, such as coffee, rum and tobacco, to Europe to sell and process, then sailed back to African where slave traders swapped goods for more slaves and continued the triangular journey.The Portuguese, the Dutch and the British, all at one time or another, occupied the castles and controlled the trans-Atlantic slave trade. An estimated 12 to 25 million Africans passed through Ghana’s ports to be sold as slaves in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean.Britain abolished the slave trade in 1807 and in 1834 declared owning slaves illegal. U.S. President Thomas Jefferson in 1808 signed a law prohibiting the importation of slaves but slave ownership continued until 1865 and the passage of the 13th Amendment.Even though Anglican and Episcopal churches later participated in and sometimes led the abolitionist movement, the churches and individual Anglicans and Episcopalians benefited from the slave trade. The 75th General Convention in 2006 sought to address the church’s role in slavery. In 2008, the Episcopal Church formally apologized for its involvement in slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Gayle Harris share a moment at Elmina Caste, one of 50 castles on Africa’s west coast that served as points of embarkation for slaves shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceSlavery’s legacy is “not only race,” said Curry, but the contradiction that the American republic was founded on democratic principles and the idea that all are created equal.“Bearing the language of the equality of humanity, though not fully living into it yet, that was a living contradiction … America has struggled to resolve. A civil war happened because it was unresolved,” he said. “And all the struggles after that, Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow segregation, the emergence of the civil rights movement … a lot of the tensions and divisions that you see in American society now, some of their origins are traceable to the fact that in our [nation’s] originating DNA, the issue of freedom and slavery was not resolved, human equality was not fully resolved. Although they [the Founding Fathers] were headed in the right direction, they weren’t quite there.”When Thomas Jefferson wrote “that all men are created equal” in the Declaration of Independence, he owned slaves; other Founding Fathers owned slaves; President George Washington owned slaves; slaves also served Presidents James Madison, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James Knox Polk and Zachary Taylor. Slave labor helped build the White House in Washington, D.C.This legacy of contradiction, of inequality and racism, that Americans and Episcopalians, black and white, continue to live with today is a legacy the Episcopal Church seeks to confront through its racial reconciliation work.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry led an Episcopal Relief & Development reconciliation pilgrimage to Ghana in January. The group posed for a photo following a Jan. 22 Eucharist at the Cathedral Church of the Most Holy Trinity in Accra. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn 2015, General Convention passed a budget that emphasized racial reconciliation, something Curry has focused on and has asked the church to work on since his installation as presiding bishop in November 2015.Slavery’s legacy is also something Upper South Carolina Bishop Andrew Waldo, who grew up in the Jim Crow South and has studied his family’s history, grapples with in his life.“I come from a family that has been in this country for a very long time, many generations of Virginia, South Carolina, Mississippi slaveholders, probably two dozen Confederate officers, naval infantry, cavalry, the whole works,” said Waldo in an interview at Cape Coast Castle, another slave castle not far from the one in Elmina.The courtyard at Cape Coast Castle. Slaves occupied the dungeons, soldiers the next level and officers the upper level. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceWaldo made these discoveries while studying his family’s genealogy, not because his parents discussed it. He began to discover how deeply involved his family was in enslaving people. Ancestors owned plantations in Virginia and southern Mississippi, and his great-great-grandfather likely attended an Episcopal church alongside Jefferson Davis, who served as president of the Confederacy during the Civil War.“I realized that if I was going to be faithful to God’s call to me as a reconciler, then I couldn’t let that history just lie there, that I was going to be somebody finding ways to heal, to repair, to reconnect,” said Waldo, saying that the reconciliation pilgrimage added a sense of urgency to his work.“When you see how many hundreds of thousands, millions of people came through these places, and sat in those dungeons,” he said, to arrive in the United States to meet the master’s whip, to be baptized and be stripped of their names. “I can only be certain that my ancestors did that to people, so I had to shift course for my family.”Christ the King Church’s red spire can be seen from the upper levels of Cape Coast Castle, where slaves were held and where the British once had an Anglican chapel above a slave dungeon. Christ the King was the first Anglican church in Ghana. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceWaldo also is shifting the course in his diocese, where six years into his episcopacy, after he’d gotten a sense of “the lay of the land,” he’s initiated a race and reconciliation committee. The 13 members of the committee came from among 40 people, all with “deep stakes” in the conversation, who applied for an appointment.Through personal stories, including Waldo’s own, Upper South Carolina Episcopalians are beginning to confront racism and slavery’s legacy in their lives and communities. The same thing is beginning to happen on a deeper level across the Episcopal Church, which is why Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny, after joining an Episcopal Relief & Development reconciliation pilgrimage in 2016, suggested one particularly for bishops.Konieczny initiated a conversation with Robert Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development, asking if the presiding bishop had been on a pilgrimage to Ghana; a year later Curry was leading one.“Michael Curry had just been elected presiding bishop and one of his big priorities is racial reconciliation … what I was saying to Rob was that as a privileged white male bishop of the Church who was being asked to speak out about racial reconciliation as a voice of reconciliation, I didn’t feel I had the authority to do that because I come from a different place,” said Konieczny, who grew up in Orange County, California, and had a 20-year law enforcement career before the priesthood.“I still don’t have the authority, but this trip gives me a story to tell about my own reconciliation of who I am, how I have been part of the racial strife and discord in our country. … I remember growing up the way the adults around talked about blacks and the words they used,” he said. He shared the story about how when his police station was first integrated, his colleagues refused to dress alongside the black officer in the locker room.The Ghana pilgrimage, he said, made him realize everything he’d been taught about slavery and racism was wrong.“I wasn’t given the truth, and then it was just the collision of my world and this other world and the recognition that I’m a racist. Hopefully a recovering racist, but yeah, whether I was overtly involved, or whether I condoned, ignored or contributed to things that were done or said, the way people acted, I think puts me in a place now where I have at least something to say and I can raise the questions and people can at least reflect and search in their own lives,” said Konieczny.Pilgrims laid an Episcopal Relief & Development wreath at Elmina Castle in Cape Coast, Ghana. Slaves were led out of the castle and loaded onto ships through “the door of no return.” Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe pilgrimage challenges each participant’s preconceived notions about slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.“The narrative that so many of us have come up with was that the great evil of slavery was actually being a slave, actually being someone held like an animal on a plantation,” said Spellers, whose great-grandmother was a slave. “I had no idea the gravity and the depth of the suffering that occurred before anyone even got to the slave ships or got to Cape Coast, how many died on the way.“One of the members of our group said, ‘This was the African Holocaust, wasn’t it?’ And I realized it was. Again, it helps me to understand why race is so hard for us to work within America, why it keeps coming back up … because there’s still so much we’ve not talked about.”The Church can offer a safe place to have difficult conversations, conversations that may involve pain, uncertainty and ambiguity, but conversations that are bathed in a mutual love and care for one another, a safe place where we can all share honestly and move into the future, said Curry.“My hope is that this journey will help us reclaim and reface a common history that we have, a painful past, not for the sake of guilt, and not for the sake of wallowing in the past, but for the sake of us, black, white, red, yellow and brown, finding ways to face our past and then turn in another direction and create a new future,” he said, quoting the words of the poet Maya Angelou: “The history, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage need not be lived again.”“That’s our goal and that’s how the past is redeemed and a new future is claimed,” said Curry. “And that is the task of the Episcopal Church.”– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Ghana reconciliation pilgrimage a ‘homecoming,’ presiding bishop says Pilgrims repent the Church’s and America’s complicity in the trans-Atlantic slave trade Tony Oberdorfer says: Alexander Scott says: February 20, 2017 at 1:44 pm Hmn. Why do I sense this misses some rather basic elements? Were EuroAmericans doing the enslaving, or were they purchasers of people already captured, offered for sale rather than just being slaughtered out of hand? Agreed, slavery was a complex problem in need of address, and its aftermath has proven stubbornly resistant to correction; whence arises the stubbornness? For Episcopalians, especially: Leonidas Polk — “bishop general” and founder of southern Episcopalians’ beloved University of the South — seems still lionized, despite leading the split in the Civil War church and being a proslavery general. (Arguably, as a southern general, his ineptitude made him a defacto ally of the Union….). Whyndomi sense that pilgrimage is not enough? February 20, 2017 at 5:23 pm I suppose if I were offered a free or heavily subsidized trip to Ghana I might jump aboard. But if our Presiding Bishop claims a desire to avoid “wallowing in the past,” that is precisely what he and his entourage have been doing during and since their so-called “reconciliation pilgrimage” to Ghana. They might at least get their facts straight: while figures vary, it is reliably estimated that fewer than 500,000 Africans were shipped to the United States, not the “millions” referred to by Bishop Waldo. But if there were cruel European slavemasters in Africa (such as the Belgians in the Congo), why ignore the fact that it was black Africans themselves who supplied those who crossed the ocean? And while it may be uncomfortable to accept the fact, most black Americans today can thank their lucky stars that their antecedents were forced to make that voyage. For miserable as their condition may have been, had they remained in Africa they might well have been among the tens of millions butchered by fellow blacks in the years that followed or who died from starvation, human crimes which continue to the present day. One hardly need approve of slavery to recognize that on the whole American blacks were better treated under slavery in the United States and in the intervening years than they would have been under black regimes in Africa. Instead of constantly yapping about how many American presidents owned how many slaves and regurgitating white guilt on junkets to Africa, how about looking into present conditions in much of that beleaguered continent? And how about recalling that it was the Anglican Archbishop of Harare who turned out to be a close friend of Robert Mugabe and the recipient of two farms from among those expropriated by Mugabe from white Zimbabwean farmers, an act which contributed to the starvation suffered by many Zimbabweans in recent years? I guess this is of no interest to the present powers-that-be in the Episcopal Church because it is not something that can be blamed on whites.Is it any wonder that so many are leaving the Episcopal Church? Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service March 2, 2017 at 12:50 pm Interesting that you give a figure of about 500,000 Africans transported to the Americas when Dr. Gates in the recent PBS show on African civilizations gives a figure of some 12 million and even the film Traces of the Trade states a figure of more than 10 million. At this time I would be questioning the sources of those figures. However, I am inclined to think that Dr. Gates may be the most correct insofar of his credibility as an historian and genealogist. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 February 21, 2017 at 8:27 am To Thomas Finlay: I am sorry to have to acknowledge that there are many in the Episcopal Church who share your way of thinking. But that is exactly why the Church has been politicized almost to oblivion and why so many members are reluctantly leaving. As an Episcopalian sinner for almost sixty years I can happily remember a time when, without ignoring the rest of the world, the Church overall concentrated on the important business of saving individual souls. That no longer seems to be the case.Though they may be reluctant to speak out for fear of being politically ostracized, I know there are black Americans who agree with me. (I refuse to use the phony term “African American” any more than I would refer to myself as a “European American”.) And so far as Christ himself is concerned, I can’t imagine he wouldn’t prefer us to spend less time bemoaning our “racist” past than working to improve black/white relations today even if this means acknowledging that blacks are responsible for many of their own persistent problems. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Ronald Davin says: The Rev. Leslie Scoopmire says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (7) Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Thomas Finlay says: Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC February 19, 2017 at 8:56 am Factually, some of those who died in the US Civil War died to preserve slavery, and some who fought on the side of the North, especially the Irish, did so with mixed emotions at best, fearing completition with freed slaves for jobs at the entry level that they both would occupy. And miserable prison conditions certainly did exist, but they still do not compare by scale with the horrors of being transported and living your entire life (extending into your children’s and grandchildren’s generations) in the brutal system of chattel slavery as it existed in the US and the Caribbean. Lincoln’s Gettysburg address was focused not on slavery (although it does tacitly mention slavery in its brief, beautiful 272 words, which I used to teach to my students as poetry), but instead focuses on the fight for Union and democracy (government of the people, by the people, for the people). Finally, to use the loaded word “junket” is disrespectful to the very real understanding and transformation that is the fruit of travel like this. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] A working group set up explore how different strands of thinking on sexuality could be kept together in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia has published its interim report. The group was established after the May 2016 meeting of the province’s General Synod agreed to “let lie on the table” a motion on the blessings of same-sex relationships. The Synod instead called for a working group to look at structural arrangements to keep the different sides of the debate together.Full article. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Sexuality working group of Anglicans in New Zealand publishes interim report In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Posted Aug 3, 2017 Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tagscenter_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Human Sexuality last_img read more

first_img Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Church of Ireland celebrates 150 years of independence This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of Ireland is celebrating 150 years since it was disestablished from the Church of England and has set out an innovative program to mark the milestone.A special service of celebration this month in St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin, where the archbishop of Canterbury will preach, launches the #D150 program and will look back on the achievements of the past century and a half.Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland Richard Clarke wrote about the landmark year, saying: “Today we may reasonably celebrate 150 years of disestablishment, but only if we are now ready to show the same faith, courage and generosity our forebears epitomized in 1869 as we seek to shape our future course.”Read the full article here. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Rachel FarmerPosted Nov 15, 2019 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more