first_img Culture Tech Industry Security 1:54 Share your voice On Wednesday, House Democrats unveiled a new border security plan that contains no money for physical barriers along the southern US border.”We’ve seen that walls can and will be tunneled under, cut through or scaled,” Rep. Pete Aguilar, from California, told The Washington Post. “We cannot focus on archaic solutions in order to address this very modern problem. Technology works for securing the border.”So what are we talking about? Smart wall systems could comprise technologies ranging from infrared and laser-enhanced cameras, drones, sensors and radar to artificial intelligence. There’s also imaging technology that scans vehicles for drugs as they pass through official border crossings. But these approaches could too easily violate our privacy, security and civil liberties, according to tech companies and the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU described security technologies as “ineffective” and warned that “programs intended for border security purposes have had a tendency to expand toward the rest of the country.” Here are the most likely technologies that could be used on the border in place of, or in addition to, a wall.SensorsSensor technology is now small enough to embed in a car, allowing it to power self-driving test vehicles. Advocates say today’s sensors could be used on the border.One company, Quanergy, says one of its products relies on lidar, which uses pulsed light to measure distances and generate detailed images, to scan for movements. Quanergy says its products can tell the difference between a person and an animal.Given that the border stretches 1,950 miles, the project might require more than 15,000 sensors. At an estimated $250 per sensor, the price tag could amount to $3.7 million, or less than 1 percent of Trump’s border wall ask.Then there’s Anduril, a 2-year-old startup that’s building sensor-packed towers filled with radar, laser-enhanced cameras and communications antennas. Together, the sensors, cameras and antennas can detect objects from two miles away and identify the difference between people and animals, the company says.Anduril is headed by Palmer Luckey, the 26-year-old co-founder of Oculus VR who was forced out of Facebook. Now in his second act, Luckey said he’s hoping to “rebuild the bridge between the tech and defense communities.”His technology, called Lattice, is already being tested by US Customs and Border Protection (CBP). In a 10-week span, it helped agents catch 55 unauthorized border crossers and seize 982 pounds of marijuana, according to a 2018 Wired profile of the company.Anduril’s and Quanergy’s technologies could potentially augment an existing program created by Elbit Systems, an Israeli company that’s reportedly built 43 towers in Arizona carrying radar as well as daylight and infrared cameras that can capture images from 7.5 miles away, according to a report by Bloomberg. The contract, awarded in 2014 for $145 million, has been called a key piece of technology by CBP. DronesDrones can use combinations of cameras, lasers and heat sensors. They’ve also been tested in war zones by the US military and by firefighters battling last year’s wildfire blazes in California.A Predator drone used by the US Customs and Border Protection agency for surveillance flights near the Mexican border.The US Customs and Border Protection agency uses drones like this Predator for surveillance flights near the Mexican border. John Moore / Getty Images CBP operates a fleet of at least nine drones, according to a 2018 report from the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington. “The biggest difficulty with drones is positioning them to surveil the border,” Cato’s report said, noting that issues such as bad weather, crashes and operation costs have plagued the program.Though CBP spent $255 million buying and operating drones between 2013 and 2016, apprehensions have risen by less than 1 percent, Cato estimates, at a cost of $32,000 per capture. Captures not involving drones cost an average of $9,000, according to Cato.CBP didn’t respond to a request for comment.Artificial intelligenceThe tech industry’s buzziest buzzword is already being used to help identify people in your photographs, recommend new beauty products and weed out bad behavior on the internet. And there are companies who say AI can help secure the border as well.Cogniac offers camera software that identifies people and objects. The company is backed by Google parent Alphabet and says its technology can work in real time with security cameras, cameras mounted on drones or even smartphones. So where is facial recognition in all this, you might ask?That technology has two potential issues. First, it would be mostly practical in places like border crossings, where lots of people stream by cameras. Second, such systems aren’t foolproof, and they carry a very real risk of abuse. “When combined with ubiquitous cameras and massive computing power and storage in the cloud, a government could use facial recognition technology to enable continuous surveillance of specific individuals,” Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote in an official Microsoft blog last year. “We must ensure that the year 2024 doesn’t look like a page from the novel ‘1984.’”Taking It to Extremes: Mix insane situations — erupting volcanoes, nuclear meltdowns, 30-foot waves — with everyday tech. Here’s what happens.CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET’s newsstand edition. Drones Microsoft Donald Trump 39 Now playing: Watch this: Comments Tags US agents patrol the border between Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico. Herika Martinez/Getty Images Since 2015, President Donald Trump has promised to build a “big, beautiful wall” along the 1,950-mile US border with Mexico: a 20- to 30-foot high concrete wall/steel fence he says will stem illegal immigration, keep out illicit drugs and stop terrorists from entering the country.Critics say a physical barrier is unnecessary and ineffective, and they argue that modern tech could do the job instead at a lower cost. Which is how we got to the recent 35-day shutdown, the longest in US government history. Trump insists on Congress budgeting $5.7 billion for a wall, while Democrats push for high-tech border protections. “The positive, shall we say, almost technological wall that can be built is what we should be doing,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said during a press conference in January. She’s proposed spending “hundreds of millions of dollars” for tech to scan for drugs and weapons and detect people attempting to cross the border. Pelosi’s office didn’t respond to a request for an interview. Neither she nor her Democratic allies have specified which technologies they’d like to fund. Border security: Tech options that could replace a walllast_img read more

first_imgIndian stock markets ended in the red Tuesday dragged by a fall in Asian equities on account of Japan’s central bank keeping prevailing negative interest rates unchanged after its meeting the same day. The S&P BSE Sensex slumped more than a percent to close at 24,551, down 253 points, while the 50-scrip NSE Nifty settled at 7,461, a loss of 78 points, or 1.04 percent. The biggest loser on the Sensex was Lupin which fell sharply in trade in response to the company informing the stock exchanges that the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has made nine observations after inspecting its Goa facility. The stock closed at Rs 1,726, down 7.59 percent from its previous close. Other stocks that pulled the Sensex down included HDFC, Dr Reddy’s Labs, Cipla, Sun Pharma and ITC. Gainers on the Sensex included State Bank of India, Tata Steel, Bharti Airtel and Axis Bank. The US Federal Reserve’s two-day meeting that begins Tuesday (March 15) would be a significant trigger for Indian stock markets on Wednesday. The Fed is expected to keep short-term interest rates on hold in view of global uncertainties, after having raised the benchmark rates from almost zero to 0.25-0.50 percent in December last year.The markets shrugged off retail inflation data released late Monday after market hours. Retail inflation was down to 5.18 percent in February from a 17-month high in the previous month.The easing of retail inflation is being seen as providing enough space for the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to cut the repo rate.”For the time being, a disciplined fiscal stance, larger than expected decline in IIP and a drop in CPI inflation have converged, and we continue to expect that the RBI will cut the policy repo rate by 25bp to 6.5% at its upcoming policy meeting (5 April),” HSBC Global Research said in a note.last_img read more

first_imgNew Zealand skipper Kane Williamson won the crucial toss and despite overcast conditions and some help for bowlers from the pitch, decided to bat first. The Black Caps have gone into the match with the same team as the semi-finals. There was rain in the morning and the pitch has a bit of grass which means that bowlers will have assitance early on. As a result, Martin Guptill and Henry Nicholls will have the big responsibility to avoid early damage from Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer, both of whom were in good form in this tournament. England captain Eoin Morgan didn’t show any disappointment and said it would have been a 50-50 decision for him if he had won the toss. He added that the team that plays better would win and hence, no great disappointment as batting second. New Zealand had batted first in the 2015 World Cup final also but could only post a modest score which was chased down easily by Australia. They would look to make amends for it today.last_img read more

first_imgHow can Houston be a more equitable city? That’s the question Mayor Sylvester Turner’s Task Force on Equity has been charged with answering. The task force consists of a number of area researchers and experts tasked with providing specific, actionable policy recommendations to make Houston a fairer city to live in.So far, they’ve come up with two key steps to achieve that goal: launching a city-wide jobs program and an early childhood education program.The findings are detailed in the new report called Rising Together: A Roadmap To Confront Inequality In Houston.One task force member is Dr. Quianta Moore from Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. Houston Matters producer Joshua Zinn asked Moore why those specific initiatives would be significant and effective steps to confronting inequality in Houston. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share X Randall Pughcenter_img Listen 00:00 /08:14 last_img read more

first_img Explore further More information: Patent: appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-P … 45&RS=DN/20120188245AbstractThere are provided apparatuses and methods for increasing the pixel density of a digital display through mechanical actuation. In some embodiments, a display device is described having a processor configured to provide an image for display and a memory coupled to the processor. The memory stores the image and is configured to map the image to a pixel matrix. A display controller is coupled to the memory and configured to sample portions of the image and to store the portions of the image into planes. Each sampled portion comprises a different set of pixels of the pixel matrix. A display is coupled to the display controller and is configured to display the contents of the sampled planes. In particular, the display controller is configured to sequentially provide the sampled planes to the display for sequential display. At least one actuator is coupled to the display to displace the display for the displaying of the sampled planes, so that pixels of each plane are displayed in a unique location from the pixels of other planes.via: www.patentlyapple.com/patently … e-video-glasses.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2012 Phys.org Citation: Apple bowl-headed patent shows wearable computing plans (2012, July 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-apple-bowl-headed-patent-wearable.htmlcenter_img (Phys.org) — Like Google, Apple has plans to win recognition as wearable computing leaders. Patently Apple reports on a patent that was filed by Apple in January last year but made known earlier this week. The patent application is causing a stir over what Apple has in mind to compete with Google over the latter’s highly anticipated Project Glass heads-up display. The Apple patent in question, titled “Display resolution increase with mechanical actuation,” speaks of multiple “embodiments,” but the concept appears to relate to raising the quality of a display placed over a wearer’s eye. The patent drawings show a very odd-looking bowl over a person’s head extending out to eyewear over just one eye. The implication beyond the obtuse patent text is clear that Apple is fixed on competing with Google for the coming generation of heads-up display wearers, and, in competing, is to use its key ammunition, its own brand recognition that Apple provides high quality visuals whether on its desktop, tablet, phone or, now possibly, on video glasses. The inventor is listed on the patent application as Edward Craig Hyatt.Those bloggers watching Apple and writing about the patent news agree that the text is obtuse, ambitiously general, and hard to pin down, as a patent application for ideas that could take any form of multiple “embodiments.” Nonetheless, it can be said that the goal of Apple seems to be to improve the resolution of images seen through a head-mounted display.According to the patent application, “There are provided apparatuses and methods for increasing the pixel density of a digital display through mechanical actuation. In some embodiments, a display device is described having a processor configured to provide an image for display and a memory coupled to the processor. The memory stores the image and is configured to map the image to a pixel matrix. A display controller is coupled to the memory and configured to sample portions of the image and to store the portions of the image into planes. Each sampled portion comprises a different set of pixels of the pixel matrix. A display is coupled to the display controller and is configured to display the contents of the sampled planes. In particular, the display controller is configured to sequentially provide the sampled planes to the display for sequential display. At least one actuator is coupled to the display to displace the display for the displaying of the sampled planes, so that pixels of each plane are displayed in a unique location from the pixels of other planes.” Google patent sends ring signals to Project Glasslast_img read more