first_img Recommended for you Exercise Design Training Workshop 22nd – 26th February 2016 HOA Opens, slew of Health Bills on Agenda; Key questions to Border Control Minister Related Items:Chikungunya, chikv, ministry of health, Portia smith Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 19 Nov 2014 – During House of Assembly debate his week, Minister Porsha Smith for Health and Human Services assured that more money from TCIG has enabled her Environmental Health Department to step up on its vector control program during this rainy season. Temporary officers have been hired she said in a ministerial statement and it was explained that there will be more messages on what to do to control both ChikV and Dengue Fever. While there is a call on the general public to partner on protecting from these mosquito borne viruses, no details were given on exactly how the Ministry or Department plans to deal with public education. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Beautiful girls on Beautiful beaches, Turks and Caicos scores with Sports Illustratedlast_img read more

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Georgetown, Guyana June 7, 2017 – The Caribbean Community (Caricom) has reaffirmed its support of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change following the US decision to withdraw from the accord. US President Donald Trump announced the withdrawal last Thursday saying that a renegotiation of terms was in the works. The US is one of only three countries not to sign the agreement which seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally. The decision is unpopular both within and outside of the US. Individual US states are working to comply with the accord outside of the federal government.In a statement, Caricom Chairman and Guyana President David Granger said although Caricom was disappointed by the withdrawal, the region remained encouraged by the many nations who have signed the agreement. “The need for global action to combat this phenomenon is past urgent…Our own commitment will never waiver. Our existence is at stake,” he said.  Granger added that Climate Change is an “existential threat” to the Caribbean which is made up of Small Island and Low-Lying Development States or SIDS. He also noted that the Paris Agreement on Climate Change was “more than just another international agreement on another complex international issue.” According to Granger, “it reflects the acknowledgment and acceptance that climate change is a global issue requiring global solutions.”Individual nation states have also denounced the decision. The Bahamas Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the withdrawal was a cause for concern and pledged to continue working towards ending Climate Change.#MagneticMediaNews#ParisAgreement #ClimateChange Bahamas to take 15-member delegation to CARICOM meeting set in Mo’Bay, Jamaica Recommended for you CARICOM Inter-Sessional Meeting discussions conclude on high notecenter_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, CARICOM, climate change, donald trump, Paris Agreement Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp UN SG is Special Guest at Opening Ceremony for CARICOM Heads Meeting Wednesdaylast_img read more

first_img2.  Measuring the performance and sustainability (with higher renewal rates) of native campaigns is difficultAs of now, the average renewal rate for brands to buy ads on a site two months after running a campaign is 40 percent.Publishers have found that measuring campaign success with branded content isn’t simply a matter of impressions or clicks. Success doesn’t always come in a standard measurement across campaigns, but there will be metrics and a report card at the end of the flight. It’s important for content providers to get creative when proving their ROI.For example, Nike’s marketing of Colin Kaepernick led to increased store traffic and higher online sales. Barron’s reported that Nike saw a 31-percent increase in sales the week after Kaepernick was announced as the latest face of the company’s long-running “Just Do It” campaign. So yes, sales matter. There are also measures for gauging perception and awareness, before and after a campaign. MediaRadar has learned many companies are using Catalina or iRI for measuring CPG sales in supermarkets to help show the impact of native content. 1.  Few media firms stand out when it comes to native content.MediaRadar CEO, Todd Krizelman, hosted two recent panels discussing native content. In both cases, the speakers agreed they should not differentiate their native advertising offerings by using a lower price. They use other differentiators like audience, brand safety, and creative execution to make their branded content stand out. Using key differentiators beyond price will win more business.Some groups, like Meredith Corp., have uncovered at least one additional element that makes their offering unique. It has developed competency in making its content “shoppable.” For example, inside online recipes, users can find a link to  purchase the ingredients. Publishers should aim to be more innovative like Meredith. Recently, MediaRadar published a trend report about native advertising. Every day, we see custom content weaving its way into just about every form of consumable content. Native continues to be one of the most popular methods in which advertisers can engage with their audiences digitally.Last year, native advertising spend was more than any other form of display advertising and, in the first half of 2018, new advertisers began using native advertising every month (read the full report here).Recently, however, it looks like the market is plateauing. Roughly 11 percent of online advertisers use native advertising formats now, and brands that buy native ads only run them across 10 percent of the total number of sites that they advertise on. Why is this happening?Here are nine fast facts to keep in mind as you sell custom content: 8.  The number of firms receiving RFP’s for native content is decreasing.Recently, MediaRadar met with a dozen media buyers at major agencies. In this room of buyers, there was a refreshing and specific consensus surrounding the number of RFPs being submitted for native content. This group feels that the number of RFPs is not declining, but that the number of firms receiving them is.Many agencies like to work with firms that can offer “One-Stop Shopping” for branded content. They want to work with a publisher who has the capacity to deliver a unified solution across media formats (desktop, mobile, email, experiential, etc.). 3.  Crafting native content takes a lot of time and effort.A great story and design require both time and talent to produce. Neither of these are areas that advertisers and content creators can afford to overlook. The actual process of crafting a native ad or campaign is a costly, multistep process, involving a lot of collaboration and rounds of review, done over a long period of time. 9.  The consolidation of in-house studios seems inevitable.Branded content studios exist within publishing houses to help create native ads, branded content, traditional ad assets, editorial content with a twist, and more. But, with the boom in the number of in-house studios for advertisers to choose from, consolidation seems inevitable.Publishers are bound to pool their creative resources together. In a recent Adweek panel, Chief Revenue Officer (CRO) of BuzzFeed, Lee Brown, predicted that “in the next 12 months, you’re going to see a massive amount of consolidation.” 7.  RFP’s can be really important to a publisher’s native content business.RFP’s are very important to a national consumer publisher’s business. Native advertising has proven not to be an exception, as publishers see up to 95 percent of their content business originates from an RFP. The RFP may originate from the brand or the agency. This may be a surprise, since many have contended that the RFP is dying (here, here, here, and here).Yet, while RFPs remain popular in the national consumer media space, it is felt that they are a poor fit for native advertising. Generally, publishers should respond within 24 to 72 hours from receiving the RFP. Since most branded content projects are quite customized and involved, having just three business days isn’t long enough to come up with a great pitch. 4.  Native advertising has the potential to be too discrete.Audiences don’t want to be disrupted by ads, but they also don’t want to be duped into believing that an advertisement is anything other than what it is. Consumers should only be exposed to online advertisements that are fair, clear, and engaging. To avoid the possibility that native advertising dupes its consumers, know how to spot native advertising. The FTC also generated a Native Advertising Guide, a manual instructing advertisers and publishers on how and when to use certain terminology and obvious labels in its ads to not deceive its viewers. 5.  Custom content is more trustworthy than traditional advertising.According to a Time Inc. study, two in three Gen-Z, Millennials, and Gen-X consumers trust branded content more than traditional advertising. As a more visually inclined generation, Gen-Z is open to engaging with custom content because, compared with traditional ads, it’s more entertaining, thought-provoking, and leaves a lasting impression. 6.  Pitch native content directly to the client, not to their agency.There is often a “much, much better understanding” of what the business needs are when talking directly to a client. It is felt that agencies are time-strapped and less plugged-in when it comes to native advertising. Also, it makes a publisher look good when they take a big idea to the client to make sure it really was heard.Success rates vary by publishing house, however. A national women’s publishing group reports that 60 percent of its business originates from the brand directly. A large regional newspaper shared with MediaRadar that their ratio was closer to 50/50 while a niche travel website and magazine reports that it wins the most business directly from clients (90 percent). Native advertising is still successful, despite its recent plateau. That’s why it’s important for publishers to identify opportunities with native in 2018 like finding more unique ways to produce native ads that will make them stand out from their competition and more.To get an even more in-depth analysis of this native advertising trend, be sure to read MediaRadar’s In-Depth Look Into the Current State of Native Advertising.last_img read more

first_imgGoogle announced a program to help people discard of opioids. Getty Google says it wants to give people information to help them beat opioid addictions. The search giant on Thursday said it will begin listing places on Google Maps where people can discard unused medications. Those places include pharmacies, hospitals and government buildings. The app will locate drug disposal centers. Google If you type in queries like “drug drop-off near me” or “medication disposal near me,” Google Maps will display local places that have drug disposal services year-round. In all, there are 35,000 locations on the app, with a focus on seven states: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan and Pennsylvania. For the project, Google partnered with those state governments, as well as the Drug Enforcement Agency, Health and Human Services, and retail pharmacies Walgreens and CVS. Google said it eventually wants to expand the program beyond those seven states. The search giant said the data from the new Maps feature won’t be used to go after people for illegal drug possession. The company said the data from the DEA and other partners will only be used to show people drop-off locations. The disposals are confidential and no-questions-asked, Google said. The news comes as health professionals and government officials try to figure out how to deal with the opioid epidemic. More than 130 people die each day in the US from opioid overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meanwhile, the tech industry has been under intense scrutiny over the positive and negative effects its products could have on society. Google has been criticized for its policing of disinformation, data collection practices and abuse on its platforms. Lawmakers have also called upon tech giants to help contain the opioid problem. After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg traveled across the US in 2017 on a “listening tour” to get out of his Silicon Valley bubble, he said one of his biggest takeaways was the severity of the opioid crisis. At a hearing before the House of Representatives last April, David McKinley, a Republican from West Virginia, grilled Zuckerberg on why illegal opioid listings weren’t removed from Facebook. “There are number of areas of content that we need to do a better job,” Zuckerberg replied. In June, the social network said searches for opioids would be redirected to a federal crisis help line.  Tags 0 Tech Industry Google Alphabet Inc. Post a comment Share your voicelast_img read more