first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Denver Post:Erin Martinez was at a news conference in February when Colorado legislative leaders and Gov. Jared Polis announced a bill that would make sweeping changes to how oil and gas are regulated. And she and her family had a front-row seat as Polis signed the bill into law Tuesday.Martinez was one of the strongest supporters of Senate Bill 19-181, which changes the mission of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the main regulatory body for the industry. She spoke during a news conference and testified in hearings for the bill’s overarching goal — putting public health, safety and the environment first when considering oil and gas development.As he prepared to sign the bill, Polis said he hoped the new law will end the conflicts over the drilling that has increased in more populated areas. “Today, with the signing of this bill, it is our hope that the oil and gas wars that have enveloped our state are over and the winner is all of us,” Polis said.The bill makes protecting public health and safety and the environment a priority when considering oil and gas projects. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the main regulatory body, would no longer be charged with fostering development.It also allows cities and counties to regulate oil and gas development under their planning and land-use powers, something communities have requested as drilling has increased in and near the growing cities and counties north and east of Denver.The oil and gas commission and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment will start writing rules to implement several portions of the new law. Some of the rules are expected to take up to a year to develop. The public will have opportunities to weigh in.More: Gov. Jared Polis ushers in new era of drilling regulation, but are “oil and gas wars” over? Colorado governor signs legislation overhauling state’s oil and gas development ruleslast_img read more

first_imgAl Shabaab militants in TrainingAl-Shabaab militants have threatened to stage more attacks in Kenya, just two days after their gunmen slaughtered 148  people at a university in the country’s north east.A statement released by the militants, says quote, ” Kenyan cities will run red with blood… this will be a long, gruesome war of which you, the Kenyan public, are its first casualties.”The statement described how they had specifically singled out non-Muslims to kill, gathering them together before executing them.The day-long siege on Thursday in Garissa was Kenya’s deadliest terror attack since the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassy in Nairobi, and the bloodiest ever by the militants.The group also issued a warning of pending attacks against Universities and institutions of higher learning forcing the institutions to heighten their security measures.The University of Nairobi, Kenyatta University and the United States International University – Kenya had all issued security memos days before the attack on Garissa University claimed by Somali Islamist militant group al-Shabaab.The memos informed students and staff of new security measures while cautioning people within their campuses to be extra vigilant.Al-Shabab has staged numerous attacks in Kenya. The 2 April massacre at Garissa University, near the border with Somalia, is the bloodiest so far.However the worst attack to date was on Nairobi’s Westgate shopping centre in 2013, when at least 68 people died.In Westgate, and other attacks, the militants spared Muslims, while killing those unable to recite verses from the Koran.There are also regular gun and grenade attacks attributed to al-Shabab both in border areas, where many Kenyans are ethnic Somalis, and in Nairobi.Kenya has sent its troops into Somali territory, where they have joined the African Union force battling the militants.Al-Shabab has also set up a recruiting network in Kenya, especially around the port city of Mombasa, which has a large Muslim population.last_img read more