first_imgCES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Walmart TP-Link TP-Link is expanding its wireless networking offerings with a fleet of WiFi 6/802.11ax hardware in both standard and mesh wireless varieties. The Deco X10 mesh wireless system is similar to Netgear Orbi, Eero and Google WiFi. It launches in Q3 2019, and will retail for $350 for a kit that includes two mesh Wi-Fi nodes you can link together to blanket a large area with wireless coverage. That’s a typical price for a multi-unit mesh set up you’d purchase today, but when it launches this fall, the Deco X10 will support the new Wi-Fi 6 standard, among other competitive specs. I would expect plenty of additional Wi-Fi 6 mesh systems available when the Deco X10 launches in Q3 2019, so don’t preorder until we get a better sense of the field.The RE300 is TP-Link’s other mesh product. Rather than working as a standalone mesh networking device, the RE300 is an extender that will add mesh capabilities to existing TP-Link Archer C7 and Archer A7 wireless routers (pending a firmware update).Read more: Wi-Fi 6: Better, faster internet is coming this year — here’s everything you need to know  TP-Link says the RE300 is the first product in its new OneMesh line of Mesh accessories, so expect additional hardware down the line. The RE300 launches in April 2019, for a reasonable $50. archer-ax11000-1 TP-Link On the standard wireless networking front, TP-Link has four new Wi-Fi 6 routers at different but aggressive price points that indicate a hefty premium for the new wireless standard. The Archer AX11000 is a tri-band gaming router that goes on sale this month for a staggering $450. The Archer AX6000 is a dual-band router that will sell for $350 in April, and the Archer AX1800 launches in Q3 2019 for a more down-to-earth $130. An Archer AX1500 model will follow, for an unspecified price. Google Wifi CES Products Wi-Fi Google Netgear CES 2019 Preview • Google Wifi router promises wall-to-wall wireless for less $239 All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 See It See it $95 Tags Smart Home Networking Comment CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mentioned Above Google Wifi Review • Google Wifi is the best whole-home Wi-Fi system on the market 1 85 Photos Share your voicelast_img read more

first_imgEuropa’s salty surface goes well with fries. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona Europa, the fourth-biggest moon orbiting gas giant Jupiter, hides a salty, liquid ocean underneath its icy shell and thus, may harbor the ingredients necessary for life. A new study has found that Europa’s surface is full of sodium chloride — table salt — and concludes the hidden ocean underneath Europa’s ice may be more similar to Earth’s oceans than previously imagined. The study, published Wednesday in Science Advances by researchers at Caltech and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, show for the first time how yellow patches on Europa’s surface, first noticed by NASA proves Voyager and Galileo decades ago, actually indicate the presence of sodium chloride. More astonishing is the fact the table salt has been hidden in plain view for years. Scientists just hadn’t been looking for it. “Sodium chloride is a bit like invisible ink on Europa’s surface,” NASA’s Kevin Hand said in a press release. “Before irradiation, you can’t tell it’s there, but after irradiation, the color jumps right out at you.” To make the discovery, the team irradiated plain white table salt in a laboratory that simulated the conditions present on Europa. They found that the white salt turned a shade of yellow — the same shade of yellow spotted by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on its imaging missions between 1995 and 2003. To confirm, they turned the Hubble Space Telescope to Europa and had it confirm the yellows on the surface were giving off a chemical signal that represented the irradiated table salt. It did.It’s a particularly important finding because of what it can tell us about the subsurface ocean chemistry. If the sodium chloride does originate from within Europa, then the moon’s ocean may resemble Earth’s much more closely. In a far-flung future, it could provide somewhere to mine as a resource or even settle. However, the authors note that they can’t yet say whether the surface table salt definitely represents the compositon of the subsurface ocean.Still, it opens the door for further investigation of Europa and suggests it may even be more geologically active than scientists once thought. If you want to sneak a look at Jupiter and its moons, there’s no better time. Jupiter is so close to the Earth right now that you only need a pair of binoculars. Europa is particularly bright so you shouldn’t have trouble spotting it. Take some popcorn and make a night of it. 3 Share your voice Comments Tagscenter_img Space geeks tweak NASA images of Jupiter’s red spot 20 Photos Sci-Techlast_img read more