first_imgThere is one more power outage to add to the list. There are 274 customers without power currently west of the Golf Course Road in Charlie Lake.The power went out shortly after 7pm and is expected to be on by 1am Thursday. The outage has been caused by the wind storm in the area. There are still several other power outages in the area. The other outages are listed as follows:East of the Red CR RD 658 – 40 Customers – Tree Down across wires – Power was expected to be on a 6pmAdvertisement – Advertisement -South of RD 256, West of RD 277 – 196 Customers – Tree down across wires – No estimated time for power to be restoredNorth-South-East-West of Alaska Highway – 264 Customers – Wind Storm – Restored at 9:30pSouth-West of Alaska Highway, North-East of Highway 29 – 196 Customers – Tree Down across wires – Power was expected to be back on at 6pmFor more info visit www.bchydro.com/outageslast_img read more

first_imgInitial results of Cassini’s March 12 flyby of Enceladus have been published.  You can watch a replay of today’s press briefing, read the blog, and read illustrated bulletins about the organic material, chemical signatures, hot spot locations, the stellar occultation (see also the Quicktime animation).  Another article shows the plume locations.  An astrobiologist (Chris McKay) added his speculations about life.  The encounter preview page contains links to more information, including the flyby details (PDF), and the video page contains an eye-grabbing animation of the flyby sequence as it was programmed with each instrument’s activities.  Here is the rundown on the major findings:The hot spots align predominantly right along the “tiger stripe” fractures at the south pole.The highest temperatures lie at certain points along the tiger stripes where plumes have been seen.Temperatures are hotter than earlier measurements: -135° F. (compared to a background temperature of less than -300° F.).  This indicates a great deal of energy is being transferred from the interior.Some transverse warm areas were detected, oriented perpendicular to the stripes.The material jets out at over 1000 mph and was strong enough to produce a measurable torque on Cassini, 120 miles away.Though most of the jets consist of ice grains 1/10,000 of an inch in diameter, simple organics were detected (methane, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde) and some complex organics (propane, propyne, acetylene).No ammonia was found.  Scientists had hoped that ammonia might depress the melting point of water and make the plumes easier to explain.The plumes appear to emerge from localized regions about half a tennis court in area, but extended along narrow strips within the tiger stripes.Though this brief press flurry did not mention it, Cassini also took a gorgeous mosaic of the north pole of Enceladus – including areas not previously imaged at high resolution.  The mosaic can be seen at the Imaging Team catalog page for March 13.    Leader of the INMS (Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer) instrument Hunter Waite (Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio) was most surprised that the chemical brew emerging from the plumes resembles that of a comet.  Enceladus is obviously not a comet.  He described the cocktail as being “like carbonated water with an essence of natural gas.”    At this time, no one speculated about the origin of the plumes or how they could be maintained for billions of years.  John Spencer of the CIRS team (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) did say that the temperatures could be hotter further down enough to allow for liquid water.    Water – that was the magic word.  The astrobiologists kicked into gear.  “Enceladus has got warmth, water and organic chemicals, some of the essential building blocks needed for life,” said Dennis Matson, project scientist (cf. 03/19/2008).  “We have quite a recipe for life on our hands, but we have yet to find the final ingredient, liquid water, but Enceladus is only whetting our appetites for more.”  These thoughts were also echoed on the NASA TV press briefing as if scripted.  Matson and astrobiologist Chris McKay in a related feature talked about the feasibility of exotic life and contrasted the “primordial soup theory” with the “deep sea vent theory.”  Either theory would work on Enceladus, they claimed.  The confidence that life is nearly inevitable contrasted starkly against an admitted background of ignorance and controversy: “We don’t know how long it takes for life to start when the ingredients are there and the environment is suitable, but it appears to have happened quickly on Earth,” the article said.  Then, with a bow to a Darwin metaphor, it continued, “So maybe it was possible that on Enceladus, life started in a ‘warm little pond’ below the icy surface occurring over the last few tens of millions of years.”  More observations will be needed, of course.    And indeed, more observations are on the way.  A series of close encounters with Enceladus has been planned during Cassini’s extended mission, which begins (pending final approval) on July 1.  The next is in August.  The cameras, which were not the prime instruments for the recent flyby, will have a chance to take extreme high-resolution photos of the tiger stripes, and the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA), which failed to operate, will get one more optimal chance to collect geyser particles.  Seven more close flybys are planned through 2009.    The March 12 encounter dipped 30 miles from the surface at closest approach; some of the daring flybys to come will be even closer – fast, low, and maybe even more thrilling.  The little 300-mile-wide moon Enceladus seems to be a strong contender for Best Actor of the Saturn awards.Good grief, Enceladus has nothing to do with life.  This is the distracting emotional appeal like the scantily-clad woman beside the truck at the used car lot.  NASA throws in the distraction at every mention of the word water in a vain belief that it will garner public support for the space program.  As could be expected, right on cue, National Geographic News picked up on this theme as the major aspect of the story.  Dave Mosher at Space.com even said “seeds of life found near Saturn.”  Incredible.  All they found was poison gas like methane and acetylene, folks!  Go experiment with your barbecue.  Write us if anything crawls out except the spider that took up residence there over the winter.    The scientists totally avoided the age issue today.  John Spencer has frankly admitted being completely baffled and embarrassed that the science community has no answer for where this little moon got its energy, or for how it could maintain it over billions of years.  Their plight has only gotten worse since the discovery of the plumes in 2005.  Recall that yesterday (03/25/2008, footnote to main entry) we highlighted a new paper in next month’s Icarus that struck down both tidal heating and radioactivity – the leading theoretical possibilities – as plausible sources of the heat.  That makes the scientists’ focus on exotic life even more distracting, as if the emperor, once exposed, quickly points to the sky and waxes eloquent about how the cloud shapes appear so very lifelike.  Let’s watch instead how his minions are going to robe their little embarrassment now that King Billions-of-Years has mooned the crowd.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgBy: Sara Croymans, M.Ed., Molly Herndon, MS,  & Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFTAdapted photo: Pixabay[Sunrise Ocean Sea Coast by MartyNZ, November 7, 2015,CCO]MFLN Family Development, Family Transitions, and Personal Finance teams presented a two-part series on Military Retirement titled “Retirement Ready? Effective Strategies for Military Families”. Part I on November 1 was a traditional webinar while Part II on November 8 offered an opportunity for participants to continue the discussion that was initiated during the first event. The purpose of this blog is to highlight the topics that generated a lot of interest and discussion, indicating the importance of the topic. Many resources are highlighted that were shared by participants and facilitators. In addition, we want to continue the discussion on the retirement topic so please share your thoughts, ideas, resources and strategies by commenting on this blog!The Transitional Side of RetirementQ. What strategies can be used to help Service members and their families realize that the stages of grief experienced during the retirement transition are “normal” and that they are not alone?A. Participants provided the following responses:People are often relieved when they realize that others are experiencing similar challenges and stressors …They should attend TGPS! (Transition GPS) as it is really good at preparing them and reminding them what is in store, out there (civilian world). And being with others who are having a similar experience provides a great informal support system!Sometimes it can help to digest big changes in little pieces so then it’s not overwhelmingNot sure exactly how it would show in the retirement situation, but I deal with Surviving family members of deceased Soldiers and we find that the grief isn’t a straight line, and it can come up years later as new life events happen. I.E. when a child gets married, the grief may re-emerge as the family wishes the DSM was there for the event.Each individual goes through the stages at different paces and varying levels of progression & regression during the process.Grief is very personal.The grief cycle is not a linear transgression.If we’re not paying close attention we can interpret frustration, grief etc. (especially in men I think) as angerThe Psychological Side of RetirementQ. What are some of the biggest challenges faced in military retirement, from a psychological perspective?A. Participants provided several responses to this question, including:The longer the member is in service, the harder it is to get back to civilian lifeSomething that civilians may have never even considered is the fact that SMs now have to change their wardrobe entirely, which can be stressful and frustrating.The higher the rank in the military one has, the harder it can be to adjust to civilian life where that rank probably doesn’t matter. SMs oftentimes find themselves having to prove themselves all over again to the civilian world after retirement.Many younger retirees are faced with the challenge of finding a new career altogether, as their job in the service may not have a “match” in the civilian world.For those people who were raised in the military and then married into the military or became SMs themselves, they may not have any idea how to be a civilian or live in the civilian world.Finding a purpose that is similar to serving in the military.Q. What have you found to be helpful in working through the challenges listed above?A.  Participants provided several responses to this question, including:If you are a service professional, assist the families in compartmentalizing their challenges and focus on one at a time rather than all of them at once. This helps with the anxiety that can be felt in trying to “fix” everything all at one time.Providing opportunities for the retired SMs and their families to participate in functions and activities to assist with the transition and in making them feel less isolated.Assisting SMs and their families early in the process of retirement (like right when the decision is made to retire) and covering every aspect of retirement rather than just the financial piece or just the psychological piece.Helping SMs feel like they have a purpose by encouraging them to reach out to organizations or people in the community that mean something to them so that they can get involved somehow.The Financial Side of RetirementQ. What are some concerns service members have about retirement issues?A. Webinar participants offered the following responses:Where do they want to live?Questions about state benefits and I suggest they check out myarmybenefits.us.army.mil; they have a benefits library that lists state taxes and waivers for car and homestead exemption. Also school benefits and more.Questions about VA disability.Will the money last?Questions about Social Security.Service Member can start off on Active Duty and transition into National Guard or the Reserves and retire with 20 yrs, but they become a “Grey Area Retiree” & their retirement starts at age 60.Q. Where will income come from in retirement?A. Webinar participants shared these comments:Some are counting on GI bill money for income.Almost all people I counseled planned to get another job after military retirement. The concern was “how much do I have to make to be comparable to military pay?”I hear from a small portion of service members that they want to start a business, which is great if they have ideas, drive and initiative. But many service members are somewhat short on knowledge of industry and business to make their idea turn into a small business that survives the initial start-up phase.The Small Business Administration centers in most states can help military personnel who might want to start a business.Q. What about IRAs?A. One webinar participant offered this tip:IRA to TSP: many service members have been told they should roll their TSP over to an IRA. Watch out! It might be a better choice for some to roll their assets INTO their TSP account, which will still belong to them long after they leave federal service.Keep the Conversation Going!If you missed Part 1 of the Retirement Ready? Effective Strategies for Military Families program, watch the recording of the webinar here. To view the conversation in Part 2, the recording can be accessed here.In addition to the resources identified above in the Q & A section many others were shared throughout the conversation, including:Online Resource Guide from the Retirement I webinar, listing articles/research, blogs, calculators, websites, and webinarsTransition related resources:www.ruralmn.umn.edu website provides great resources on staying resilient including the publication Change: Loss, Opportunity and Resilience“More than Money Decisions” chapter in Planning Ahead for Retirement publicationPsychological related resources:Emotionally Focused Therapy resources:Good Therapy.orgPsychotherapy.netFinancial related resources:What is your R3? Retirement Readiness Rating2016 Retirement Confidence Survey ResultsBallpark Estimate – retirement savings planning toolMy Retirement Paycheck from the NEFE (National Endowment for Financial Education)Monte Carlo retirement calculators such as MoneyChimpBlended Retirement Talking PointsMarch 13, 2017 webinar on Blended Retirement SystemWe want to know! What concerns do you hear from Service Members as they plan for retirement? What strategies & resources do you utilize when working with them? Please share your insights on these topics by commenting on this blog.This post was written by Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFT, Sara Croymans, M. Ed., and Molly Herndon of Military Families Learning Network. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network  on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgWest Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday said she would have shared Teesta water with Bangladesh had there been enough water available. “Bangladesh has stopped giving us Hilsa. This is because we could not give them Teesta water. We would have given if we had surplus water,” Ms. Banerjee said on the floor of the State Legislative Assembly.The sharing of Teesta water is a major bilateral issue between India and Bangladesh. Ms. Banerjee has said that entire north Bengal will run dry if the water was shared with Bangladesh. Instead, she has proposed sharing the waters of other north Bengal rivers such as Torsa, Manshai, Sankosh and Dhansai.last_img read more