first_imgBusinesses throughout Donegal have been urged to provide sanitary disposal facilities in their male public restrooms for the disposal of incontinence products by men suffering from this condition. The calls were made by leading experts in hygiene, Initial, following the Irish Longitudinal Study on ageing that found that 1 in 7 older adults in Ireland experiences urinary incontinence and that 25% of those affected experience limitations in their normal activities because of this.According to Initial, incontinence is an issue affecting many older people in Ireland, both men and women. Dr Susmita Sarma, President of the Continence Foundation of Ireland said: “There is a lot that businesses can do to help facilitate those suffering from incontinence.“It is a condition which is often overlooked and which affects many Irish people,” she added.“The provision of sanitary disposal facilities in men’s public bathrooms would be an important step for businesses to take in order to make their lavatories more accommodating.” While many businesses provide sanitary disposal bins in their female bathrooms, men are often overlooked in this regard. As a result, men suffering from incontinence cannot dispose of their incontinence products in a hygienic way.Richard Faulkner, Technical Field Consultant with Initial said: “All public washrooms should have hygienic disposal facilities available.“Without sanitary bins in place, people either cannot dispose of their incontinence products or resort to using regular waste bins or toilets for disposing of them.“This is both unhygienic and unsafe.”   Calls made for the installation of male sanitary bins across Donegal was last modified: March 20th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img(Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Fantastical scenarios with no evidence – sometimes contrary to evidence – continue to get good publicity in science venues.Imagining Dyson Spheres:  No one has ever seen a Dyson sphere (a theoretical way for an alien civilization to conserve all the energy from a dying star).  No one has seen an alien civilization, for that matter.  It didn’t stop Live Science from describing the “incredible technology” of Dyson spheres and how they will enable SETI researchers to find aliens.  Live Science took another step into Fantasyland by posting an “infographic” about objects we have no information about.  What would its editors think of an infographic about heaven, which arguably has more information from multiple sources?  Would that qualify for a science news post?  Yet Dyson spheres (imagined by futurist Freeman Dyson) were described as devices by which “advanced civilizations would conquer the galaxy.”  Presumably they would have to be intelligently designed, but ID is shunned by Live Science except for ridicule.Imagining superhabitable worlds:  National Geographic posted a discussion about planets that are more habitable than Earth.  None of these are known; they are only supposed as possible.  To its credit, the article gives views of skeptics who think the question is vacuous.  Still, “If superhabitable planets exist, and if we develop the means to find them, they may turn out to be more common than Earthlike planets,” the article speculates.  Just thinking about it “could broaden our chances of discovering life on other worlds,” the speculation continues, “because it opens up the possibility that there may be some super-Earth planets with appropriate conditions for life.”Imagining many ways to unguided life:  An extremely optimistic article about the origin of life was printed by Science Magazine on January 17.  In a response to pessimistic thoughts recently expressed by Steven Benner (see 8/28/13, 9/07/13 and 12/31/13), Jimmy Gollihar, Matthew Levy and Andrew D. Ellington are highly confident that science is on the verge of finding the way life evolved.  Indeed they are impressed with the “many paths to the origin of life” that create an embarrassment of riches:The origin of life remains a daunting mystery in part because rather than knowing too little, we increasingly know about too many possible mechanisms that might have led to the self-sustaining replication of nucleic acids and the cellularization of genetic material that is the basis of life on Earth.To speak so optimistically, they have to virtually leap over conceptual canyons.  Difficulties with homochirality, adverse reactions forming tars, the problem of compartmentalization and other daunting challenges (such as the improbability of reaching functional information from nonliving chemistry) are treated as low hurdles that primordial cells would rush forth to conquer like Olympic athletes.  Those cells could have even used teamwork:As RNA or an alternative precursor nucleic acid begins to self-replicate, protection from molecular parasites and the low concentrations of needed substrates become paramount in propagating chemical information content. Compartmentalization of the genetic/catalytic machinery would have necessarily been an early invention or co-option of a self-replicase. The demonstration of protocell division based on simple physical and chemical mechanisms lends credence to the idea that nucleic acid and vesicle replicators got together for mutual benefit.In closing Gollihar, Levy and Ellington point back to the Miller experiment for inspiration:The great benefit of the demonstration of prebiotic amino acid synthesis from a simple gas mix and an electrical spark was not that it was a cookbook for how things occurred, but rather that it was the identification of a plausible path to an origin of life that would continue to bear experimental fruit.Being translated, an experiment that failed to serve as a cookbook inspired other cookbooks that so far have cooked up only imaginary scenarios after 50 years of trying by intelligent cooks in the kitchen.This last article was ungodly awful; Baloney Detector apprentices should use it as a case study.  Its perhapsimaybecouldness index saturated our meters: 4 could‘s, 4 may‘s, and 5 might‘s in the short article (and those are only the overt indicators).  Faster than a speeding bull**it, more powerful than a “loco” motive, able to leap tall futilities in a single bound, it’s absurd.  It’s insane.  It’s Supermad.  Yet it was published in Science Magazine, not Marvel Comics.  These delusional sciopaths simply imagined solutions to every show-stopper the more realistic scientists and philosophers have wept over their beer about.  It “is easy to imagine how such simple replicators might have evolved in complexity,” they said.  (Speak for thyselves, dreamers.)  Later “an origin can be imagined that involves” blah blah blah, till, “Ultimately, a fully functional RNA polymerase should evolve from the heady broth of reactions in the primordial soup.”  Ah yes, primordial soup.  Old mythoids die hard.The perceptive Baloney Detector finds instances of personification scattered throughout the scenario: “it is possible that prebiotic analogs of these enzymes might have assisted in chemical syntheses” (contrary to the laws of chemistry), they presume; “millions of years of a poor replicator (a blink on the geological time scale) might well have been necessary to craft a feedback cycle” (there’s the moyboys‘ magic wand); replicators “got together for mutual benefit,” while a better replicator arises “that could better feed itself by directing the chemistry around it.”   Imagine that; a non-living molecule with a mind, will, and even leadership!  In other places they hid their Tinker Bell fairy in passive voice, speaking of “the evolution of,” or how things “arose” or “led to” this or that.Where is the science?  Realize that the actions of intelligent agents in a chemistry lab have nothing to do with their subject matter.  They are using intelligent design!  Listen: “Ribozymes have been crafted that make carbon-carbon bonds, glycosidic bonds, phosphodiester bonds, and others, and it is possible that prebiotic analogs of these enzymes might have….” blah blah blah, and so on, and so forth, etc.  What’s another word for “crafted,” students?  Intelligently designed!  How about “possible” and “might”?  Speculation!  You can’t design a robot and then speculate that rocks can do the same.  (Well, you can, but don’t call it science.)At one point, the authors used the word “unguided” properly: “Initial insights that biological compounds could be generated by prebiotic means quickly ran up against a gap in our understanding of how unguided syntheses could result in defined templates for replication.”  That’s what they are stuck with: unguided processes.  They need to keep their intelligently guided hands off the story and watch it implode.  These unguided molecules are simply not going to do what they need them to do.  (Notice that words like “prebiotic” build evolutionary assumptions into them by the power of suggestion.)It is atrocious that imagineers without a leg to stand on empirically can get away with dreaming on the job in science magazines and websites.  These are the same ones who refuse to consider intelligent design, which has tons of empirical backing for its scientific principles (e.g., archaeology, cryptology, forensics), as they repeat ad nauseum the long-debunked canard that if something is not 100% materialistic, it must be religious.  It’s about time to declare Tinker Bell worship as a religion: the preferred “mystery religion” of the scientism crowd.last_img read more

first_imgSouth Africa’s future is in good hands, President Jacob Zuma said as he joined Britain’s Prince Edward in recognising the achievements of 130 young people from across the country at the President’s Award for Youth Empowerment ceremony in Cape Town on Thursday night.President Jacob Zuma presented the awards together with Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex, and Sophie Rhys-Jones, the Countess of WessexPresenting the awards at the Table Bay Hotel together with Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex, and Sophie Rhys-Jones, the Countess of Wessex, Zuma paid tribute to Mandela, the awards’ founding patron-in-chief, who passed the role on to him in 2010.The awards form part of the Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award programme, which takes place in 144 countries.Zuma praised the 300 award recipients and 1 500 youngsters from schools, community youth groups and correctional centres that took part in the awards programme through various projects – including a pre-school literacy project in the Eastern Cape, a clothing project for those in need in the Western Cape, and a desk refurbishing project for a needy school in Gauteng.“We always say that the youth are the future of our country, but it takes coming to an event like this and to see the determination to succeed and to contribute to building the country, that we become convinced that indeed, this country will be in good hands.”Zuma was encouraged to hear about the joint collaborative projects that the youth are involved in through the programme.“In fact, we are particularly pleased by the participation of youth from correctional centres, as our view is that their lives must change for the better,” Zuma said, pointing out that the introduction of the award programme in correctional centres was Mandela’s initiative.The awards form part of the Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award programme, which takes place in 144 countries (Images: The Presidency flickr stream)He said he was also encouraged to learn that, as part of the awards’ 30th anniversary year, three regional workshops were held with the support of Brand South Africa, the National Youth Development Agency and the Department of Arts and Culture.Part of each workshop involved award participants being informed about the National Development Plan (NDP) and how they, as young people, could help to realise the plan’s Vision 2030.“We want the youth to own the NDP and to be part of its implementation, as it is designed to make this country a better place for them.”Zuma added that the awards programme played an important role in promoting relations between South Africa and the UK.Last month, during the 10th session of the SA-UK Bilateral Forum, a youth empowerment dialogue was held to discuss youth employment, skills and entrepreneurship.South Africa and the UK both recognised that, in tackling social transformation, it was crucial to create “platforms in which youth development in all its forms can thrive and translate into meaningful contributions to the economy”, Zuma said.Jason Caldicott, a prison inmate and drug addict who joined the Presidents Awards programme and took part in making a film and in various community projects, said the programme had helped change his perspective on life, such that he was “ready to contribute to a better South Africa”.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture will soon begin aerial treatments designed to control the gypsy moth population in Ohio.  Treatments on 1,308 acres in Licking County will begin in late April or early May, as larva and leaf development reaches the optimal threshold for treatment.Treatments are administered using a low-flying aircraft that flies just above tree tops. High humidity, low temperature and minimal wind are crucial for a successful application. Treatment will most likely take place during early morning hours.The department will use Foray (Btk), a naturally occurring bacterium found in the soil that interferes with the caterpillars’ feeding cycles. These treatments are not toxic to humans, pets, birds or fish.Ohioans can view maps of treatment blocks at www.agri.ohio.gov. Daily updates on treatment progress across the state are available on the website or by calling 614-387-0907 or 1-800-282-1955, ext. 37, any time after 5 p.m.Gypsy moths are invasive insects that defoliate over 300 species of trees and shrubs. In its caterpillar stage, the moth feeds on the leaves of trees and shrubs and is especially fond of oak. A healthy tree can usually withstand only two years of defoliation before it is permanently damaged or dies. In Ohio, 51 counties are currently under gypsy moth quarantine regulations.The department uses three programs to manage the gypsy moth population in Ohio. The suppression program is used in counties where the pest is already established, but landowners voluntarily request treatment to help suppress populations. The second program, slow-the-spread, occurs in counties in front of the larger, advancing gypsy moth population. The third program is the eradication program, used in counties where isolated populations develop ahead of advancing moth populations due to human movement of the moth. Officials work to detect and control isolated populations to slow the overall advancement of the gypsy moth infestation.For more information about the gypsy moth or for specific treatment locations, visit www.agri.ohio.gov.last_img read more

first_img_This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called “Building Science Fundamentals” taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube of Building Science Corporation._ For information on attending a live class, go to BuildingScienceSeminars.com In our last episode, Dr. Joe Lstiburek compared air barriers and vapor barriers, and explained how airtightness helps keep homes free of mold and rot. This week Dr. Joe explains how water and salt move through masonry by osmosis, often causing serious damage to foundations. He also offers some solutions to this common problem. __________________________________________________ Osmosis isn’t a problem everywhere In new construction, it’s real easy: you coat the top of the footing, you’ve got your stone (capillary) break, you’ve got your dampproofing. You don’t have to worry about salt, and you don’t have to worry about capillarity — life is good. It’s kind of hard to retrofit this. It’s a wonderful way to do it in new construction, but it’s tough if you’ve got a 100-, 200-, or 300-year-old structure to deal with. What’s so bad about salt and water? The physics of the osmosis forces works like this: water takes the salt in solution to a surface, the water evaporates, and the salt is left behind. And as more water evaporates, more salt accumulates, so the concentration of salt goes up. As the concentration of salt goes up, water rushes to the concentration of salt in order to dilute it — because one of the rules of physics is that nature doesn’t like these kinds of concentrations. The action of the water rushing to the surface actually creates hydrostatic forces. This pressure from the water rushing through the pore system causes the material to flake apart, and the explosive flaking is referred to as spalling. Let me summarize this: salt is very bad; water is very bad; salt and water together — whoa! Osmosis is powerful stuff The pressures are extraordinary. With diffusion, pressures are 3 to 5 psi — it’s nothing. Water vapor never pushed nothing off of nothing. Capillary pressures are fairly impressive — 300 to 500 psi. It moves water to the top of a 400-foot tree. That’s a pretty impressive force. But it isn’t anywhere close to the league of osmosis pressures, which are 3000 to 5000 psi. The compressive strength of even good concrete is 2000 to 3000 psi — salt and water will beat concrete every time. Osmosis beats capillarity which beats diffusion. Wow. Bridges fall down, life comes to an end, when you have salt and water. Sacrificial mortars are one solution Well, old-timers figured stuff out. What these folks noticed was that the mortar was eaten away much faster than the masonry, and certain mortars were eaten away much faster than others. The pore structure of the mortar was very critical to this. And someone said, “Aha! Maybe if I get the pore structure just right, all of the salt will end up in the mortar instead of the brick. And the mortar can sacrifice itself to protect the integrity of the brick.” That’s when we figured out that softer, weaker mortars are actually the ideal complement to clay brick that’s been fired at a specific temperature. And the solution would be to re-point the mortar as it was eaten away. You never want to have a mortar that’s stronger than the brick, because then the brick sacrifices itself to protect the mortar. That’s why historic preservationists — the old ones that know stuff because they’ve been around a long time — go to an enormous amount of trouble in old buildings to match the mortar chemistry precisely. The general rule is: if you don’t know what’s going on, don’t mess with the building. Or if something’s been around for two or three hundred years, don’t mess with the strategy. If you come up with the right mix, all of the deterioration happens in the joints, and you simply re-point them on a 15 or 20 year basis. Parging protects the entire surface Well, why not just coat the whole thing with a sacrificial layer? And instead of doing this on a 10-year basis, why not extend this to a 30- or 40-year basis? The way you think of this sacrificial layer is as a sort of lime-based poultice that sucks the salt poison out of the assembly. So how do you know when you have to replace it? Well, when it falls off. It’s the building telling you it’s time to put on another sacrificial layer.Related topicsRead about a real-world example of water damage in a brick foundation. And find strategies for keeping bulk water away from a basement.last_img read more

first_imgBSE Institute, Mumbai has announced the launch of a Post Graduate Program in Business Journalism. Spread across four modules, this will be a full-time one year autonomous programme.The last date for receiving applications is August 20, 2012. The programme is expected to commence in the last week of August.The faculty for this program will comprise reputable practitioners from the industry.This program will provide required knowledge and understanding of financial products, develop analytical skills and build a professional ttitude amongst students.For further information, visit http://pgpbj.bsebti.comlast_img read more