first_img“In the Swiss market, there are a lot of asset managers that have had sustainable investments in place for decades”Sabine Döbeli, CEO of the Swiss Sustainable Finance (SSF) association“In the Swiss market, there are a lot of asset managers that have had sustainable investments in place for decades. They are well in [a] position to prepare the kind of offer that institutional asset owners need,” the CEO said, adding that on the other hand most pension funds are now working to define sustainable policies.Döbeli believes the Swiss market is prepared to continue to embrace sustainability as a mainstream approach for investments, although a number of asset managers are still at the start of the journey.“For this reason, we teamed up with SFAMA, the Swiss Funds and Asset Management Association, to develop recommendations on sustainable asset management that will be published next week. The guidelines encourage all mainstream asset managers to adopt sustainable investment strategies,” she added.The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked a debate on whether to stress social or environmental issues with regards to ESG policies.The Swiss Sustainable Finance association expects a shift towards social topics.“Clearly, climate change is a key challenge for our society and therefore has to be at the top of the agenda, but I also see that the crisis made people realize that it is important to take social factors into account, and I’m sure these topics will move up on both the political agenda and the one of investors,” Döbeli said.“Good governance is an important starting point to build sustainable strategies and “as an investor, you have to take E, S and G into account,” she concluded.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here. Overall, last year the volume of sustainable investments increased by 62% to CHF1.2trn. The figure covers sustainable investment funds (+147%), sustainable mandates (+195%) and sustainable assets of asset owners (+6 %).“What these figures really represent is a form of mainstreaming of sustainable investments. These kind of growth rates are only possible because an increasing number of asset managers and institutional asset owners are applying sustainability approaches to their broad assets,” Döbeli said.For the future, the study noted that asset owners and asset managers expect continued growth for sustainable investments with key drivers being the demand from institutional and private investors, legislative framework, political pressure, and pressure from the boards.“Our goal is to have 100% sustainable investments in a few years’ time. I don’t think there is a limit to this kind of growth, because in our view it does make sense to apply sustainability approaches in all asset classes and segments, of course in different forms depending on the asset class,” the CEO added.Equity investments rose by CHF194.4bn last year to CHF311.9bn – the largest shift recorded – among asset classes for sustainable investments, followed by corporate bonds with CHF208.9bn and sovereign bonds reaching CHF168.6bn.The report underlined that growth in equity investments can mainly be ascribed to asset managers increasingly considering ESG factors for funds that have large positions in equity and corporate bonds. Swiss investors are increasingly assessing the positive social and environmental impacts of investments in the real economy, Sabine Döbeli, chief executive officer of the Swiss Sustainable Finance (SSF) association, told IPE.“We have seen an interesting development in the past year with impact and outcome oriented approaches moving up on the list,” she said, commenting on the Sustainable Investment Market Study that SSF recently published with the Center for Sustainable Finance and Private Wealth (CSP) at the University of Zurich.According to the study, environmental, social and governance (ESG) engagement, ESG voting and impact investment recorded the highest growth rate among the different investment approaches in 2019, with the latest of the three up 209%.Institutional investors dominate the Swiss market of sustainable investment with a share of 79%, or CHF917.4bn (€850bn), but the private segment rose by 185% to CHF245.8bn.last_img read more

first_img Published on February 2, 2011 at 12:00 pm HARTFORD, Conn. –– Left, right. Left, right. Left, right…Showering down on Baye Moussa Keita was the same chant the Connecticut student section unleashes on every player of the opposing team who has fouled out. With 3:10 remaining in No. 17 Syracuse’s 66-58 win over UConn, the student section traced every Moussa Keita step with a yelp in unison. Each one. From the time the freshman center secured his fifth foul when guarding Connecticut center Alex Oriakhi to the instant he found a seat on the Syracuse bench. Roughly 30 seconds.The energetic chant was, of course, meant to poke fun. To badger. To heckle a freshman.But after Moussa Keita bullied Oriakhi and UConn’s other bigs in the best game of his college career, the Connecticut students were effectively serenading a rookie after a breakout performance.With their own choreographed energy, the students showcased exactly what SU junior small forward Kris Joseph feels Moussa Keita brings every night. Certainly what he brought Wednesday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘Energy,’ Joseph said. ‘That is what he has been bringing since the beginning of the year. He brought heart, and he brought energy. It’s tough when you are demanding all that from a freshman.’In 27 near-flawless minutes, Moussa Keita flanked the dependable Rick Jackson by hauling in 11 rebounds. He added an astounding six steals and two blocks, scoring four points on 2-of-4 shooting.What he brought to the table for SU was, arguably, the most valuable player at the XL Center on Wednesday. In what is becoming not only a reoccurring but mind-numbing part of SU games, head coach Jim Boeheim started Moussa Keita’s fellow freshman center Fab Melo, only to pull Melo for Moussa Keita after three minutes.Melo once again did nothing for SU. Moussa Keita spelled him. He played 27 of the next 36 minutes.All Boeheim could do postgame was laud the Senegal native.‘He was great,’ Boeheim said of Moussa Keita. ‘Blocking shots, rebounding. He was tremendous, I thought. Tremendous. Tremendous in the middle.’Tremendous because of awareness. Through 23 games, Boeheim has vented about Melo’s uselessness if he is lost defensively. Wednesday, he was again. But Moussa Keita was the glue in the middle of SU’s 2-3 zone. A lanky 6-10 magnet that corralled seemingly every loose ball.To Joseph, Moussa Keita left the XL Center court the furthest thing from a rookie.Said Joseph: ‘I don’t consider him a freshman anymore.’Waiters, Southerland return to floorFor two Syracuse regulars who missed the Orange’s last game at Marquette, Wednesday represented two different paths. For one, redemption and solidification in the SU lineup. For the other, more time likely spent on the bench.The former: freshman guard Dion Waiters. The latter: James Southerland.Keeping things in perspective like he has done all season with Waiters, SU head coach Jim Boeheim said his young guard still has much to learn. Still, Boeheim said Waiters was a major factor in SU’s win Wednesday.‘I thought Dion stepped up big time today,’ Boeheim said.Waiters shined in his first contest back from a one-game stint on the bench after he didn’t play last Saturday at Marquette. On Wednesday, he played 18 valuable minutes off Boeheim’s bench, scoring nine points and grabbing four rebounds. He also helped form the first line of defense at the top of the SU zone against Connecticut guard Kemba Walker.It all came a game after rumors stating he was benched due to an exchange of choice words on the SU sideline with Boeheim during the Orange’s 22-point home loss to Seton Hall on Jan. 25.‘We were in a little slump,’ Waiters said. ‘We all were. Just to come out and get this win on the road at UConn, it was big. I’m happy, man.’Also returning to the floor Wednesday was Southerland. Southerland got on the floor for only a minute before missing a 3-pointer and committing a foul. By that point, Boeheim saw enough. That explained why Southerland did not see playing time both Wednesday and at Marquette.‘He had a great opportunity in three games and had one rebound,’ Boeheim said. ‘So he played his way out.’For Waiters, though, this game reaffirmed his status as one of the regulars in Boeheim’s rotation. And it reaffirmed the self-confidence he’s never afraid to display.‘I just went out there like I had to make something happen for my team,’ Waiters said, ‘and we’re going to win this game.’aolivero@syr.edubplogiur@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more