first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Taylor Kuykendall for SNL:As the coal sector crumbles, analysts aim to draw up exactly what the industry might look like once it is pieced back together.Chiza Vitta, an analyst with Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, said that even though his group covers base metals, precious metals and other mining companies, coal is taking up the bulk of the group’s time these days. The reason such a “significant amount” of time is being dedicated is the industry has gotten into such “severe distress” analysts must continually reassess the sector’s financial health as more and more coal giants fall into bankruptcy or teeter on the edge of it.“There’s a lot of negative sentiment out there,” Vitta said at the recent 24th Annual Platts Coal Properties & Investment conference.In addition to struggling to convince the broader investing public to get on board with coal, the industry is also seeing hesitancy in conventional lenders and other financiers, Vitta said. This is has caused debt to trade at distressed levels and prompted a trend toward more “private money” on the table from certain strategic investors.The result is merger and acquisition activity in early 2016 that is “well behind” the year before, even though coal assets have become available at rock bottom prices.Full article ($): Bankruptcy, tightened market cloud coal’s future as headwinds continue in 2016 SNL: 2016 ‘Headwinds’ Facing U.S. Coallast_img read more

first_imgNorwegian subsea services provider Reach Subsea has been awarded a frame agreement for the provision of inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) services to Statoil. The frame agreement has a duration of five years and starts in 2019, Reach Subsea said on Friday.Commercial terms under the agreement are confidential between the parties. However, the frame agreement is call-off based, which means that Statoil can award contracts for IMR services in the North Sea on an as needed basis, the company explained.Reach Subsea CEO, Jostein Alendal, said: “We are proud to be awarded the IMR Frame Agreement with Statoil, which is of significant strategic importance and improves visibility for our service offerings for the next five years.”Statoil also recently awarded a five-year contract to Subsea 7 for the provision of subsea inspection, repair and maintenance services on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The contract involves the provision of a life of field support vessel Seven Viking for five years.The services includes onshore project planning and offshore operational execution.last_img read more

first_imgArsenal’s Bukayo Saka, who is eligible to play for both Nigeria and England, says he is weighing up his international options but will not rush his decision.“I am always thinking about it but I haven’t made a decision yet,” the 18-year-old told BBC Sport.Saka, born to Nigerian parents, has so far represented England at youth leve. The Arsenal youth academy graduate said neither England nor Nigeria had so far approached him about his senior international future.“No-one has been in touch but when I make a decision you will find out,” said Saka.The talented winger is having a breakthrough season with Arsenal.He made his Premier League debut at the age of 17 – making history in the process when he became the first footballer born in 2001 to play in the Premier League.The young Arsenal star paid tribute to former Gunners coach Unai Emery for giving him his chance.“I have a lot of thanks to give him because he gave me so much confidence, he gave me my debut and he kept pushing me. I am grateful to him always.“It’s just something I have always dreamed of, coming up from the academy to the first team.”Now Saka says he is focused on the future with Arsenal’s newly appointed manager, Mikel Arteta.“I have heard positive things about him and I am looking forward to working with him.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Bukayo Sakalast_img read more

first_img EGBA: German Policy unfit to tackle black market threats July 16, 2020 Submit Maarten HaijerMaarten Haijer, Director General of the European Gaming & Betting Association (EGBA), has urged European Union policymakers to push for the development of a common rulebook on online gambling protections, standards and safeguards.Writing a guest post on EU news source Politico.eu, Haijer reaffirms EGBA’s position that a reported +12 million European online gambling consumers are being underserved by inconsistent online gambling policies.“The challenges are obvious: The internet has no national borders, which means Europeans can easily play on gambling websites based in countries other than where they live,” said Haijer. “But the quality of national gambling regulations in the EU varies significantly and there is no consistency between them.”Detailing inconsistencies, Haijer points to research undertaken by the University of London which outlined that only Denmark had implemented European Commission policies and safeguards on online consumer protections, instructed by the EU in 2014.The EGBA points to major gaps in customer safeguards against problem gambling, detailing that half of EU member states have yet to implement player self-exclusion registries.Furthermore, the EGBA details major member state failings in underage age gambling protections, as well as customer record keeping and identification.Haijer added: “These are major failings in the effort to keep Europe’s citizens and gamblers safe online — and they could easily be avoided. Even some basic safeguards are not available everywhere in the EU.That is why the EGBA calls for more common EU rules and safeguards to better protect Europe’s more than 12 million online gamblers. A common rulebook would establish the strong and consistent safeguards needed to protect Europe’s citizens, particularly vulnerable groups, such as minors and problem gamblers.”In 2017, the ECJ detailed that it would no longer enforce EU laws on gambling sector regulations, detailing that national policy, standards and legislations would be ultimately determined by member state governments.“It is 2019: if the EU is really serious about making the digital single market work for its consumers, there is no reason why online gamblers living in one member country should be less protected than those living in another. It is time to act.” Related Articles Share EU research agency demands urgent action on loot box consumer safeguards July 29, 2020 Share David Clifton, Licensing Expert: Has the die already been cast? July 15, 2020 StumbleUponlast_img read more