first_img“In the Swiss market, there are a lot of asset managers that have had sustainable investments in place for decades”Sabine Döbeli, CEO of the Swiss Sustainable Finance (SSF) association“In the Swiss market, there are a lot of asset managers that have had sustainable investments in place for decades. They are well in [a] position to prepare the kind of offer that institutional asset owners need,” the CEO said, adding that on the other hand most pension funds are now working to define sustainable policies.Döbeli believes the Swiss market is prepared to continue to embrace sustainability as a mainstream approach for investments, although a number of asset managers are still at the start of the journey.“For this reason, we teamed up with SFAMA, the Swiss Funds and Asset Management Association, to develop recommendations on sustainable asset management that will be published next week. The guidelines encourage all mainstream asset managers to adopt sustainable investment strategies,” she added.The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked a debate on whether to stress social or environmental issues with regards to ESG policies.The Swiss Sustainable Finance association expects a shift towards social topics.“Clearly, climate change is a key challenge for our society and therefore has to be at the top of the agenda, but I also see that the crisis made people realize that it is important to take social factors into account, and I’m sure these topics will move up on both the political agenda and the one of investors,” Döbeli said.“Good governance is an important starting point to build sustainable strategies and “as an investor, you have to take E, S and G into account,” she concluded.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here. Overall, last year the volume of sustainable investments increased by 62% to CHF1.2trn. The figure covers sustainable investment funds (+147%), sustainable mandates (+195%) and sustainable assets of asset owners (+6 %).“What these figures really represent is a form of mainstreaming of sustainable investments. These kind of growth rates are only possible because an increasing number of asset managers and institutional asset owners are applying sustainability approaches to their broad assets,” Döbeli said.For the future, the study noted that asset owners and asset managers expect continued growth for sustainable investments with key drivers being the demand from institutional and private investors, legislative framework, political pressure, and pressure from the boards.“Our goal is to have 100% sustainable investments in a few years’ time. I don’t think there is a limit to this kind of growth, because in our view it does make sense to apply sustainability approaches in all asset classes and segments, of course in different forms depending on the asset class,” the CEO added.Equity investments rose by CHF194.4bn last year to CHF311.9bn – the largest shift recorded – among asset classes for sustainable investments, followed by corporate bonds with CHF208.9bn and sovereign bonds reaching CHF168.6bn.The report underlined that growth in equity investments can mainly be ascribed to asset managers increasingly considering ESG factors for funds that have large positions in equity and corporate bonds. Swiss investors are increasingly assessing the positive social and environmental impacts of investments in the real economy, Sabine Döbeli, chief executive officer of the Swiss Sustainable Finance (SSF) association, told IPE.“We have seen an interesting development in the past year with impact and outcome oriented approaches moving up on the list,” she said, commenting on the Sustainable Investment Market Study that SSF recently published with the Center for Sustainable Finance and Private Wealth (CSP) at the University of Zurich.According to the study, environmental, social and governance (ESG) engagement, ESG voting and impact investment recorded the highest growth rate among the different investment approaches in 2019, with the latest of the three up 209%.Institutional investors dominate the Swiss market of sustainable investment with a share of 79%, or CHF917.4bn (€850bn), but the private segment rose by 185% to CHF245.8bn.last_img read more

first_imgFollowing the disheartening loss to crosstown rival UCLA, the USC men’s basketball team (10-13, 1-9 Pac-12) will host the Utah Utes (16-7, 5-6) today with hopes of getting their elusive second conference win and halting their current four-game snide.Shining example · Senior guard Pe’Shon Howard led the Trojans with 16 points, including perfect marks from the three-point and free-throw line, in USC’s 84-66 loss to Utah last month. Howard averages 10.5 points per game. – Jojo Korsh | Daily Trojan USC made a visit to Salt Lake City earlier in the season and walked out the losers by a score of 84-66. The Utes controlled the game the whole way, but, like most games for the Trojans, USC fought to stay within striking distance before eventually biting the dust.In that contest, the Trojans struggled to contain Utes guard Delon Wright, as the Los Angeles native dropped 22 points.“Delon Wright really put us in a bind,” said USC head coach Andy Enfield after the game. “He drove the ball really well — got to the foul line 11 times.”In general, it seemed to most that the better team won that contest.“I thought Utah played a good game,” Enfield said.The Utes are not necessarily one of the elite teams in the Pac-12, but the Trojans have no right to overlook any given team. The excitement that surrounded Enfield and his squad coming into this campaign quickly turned into embarrassment when conference play began.The Trojans’ 1-9 mark in Pac-12 play is one of the worst in recent memory. Enfield will be given a few seasons to bring in the type of players that fit his run-and-gun system, but he certainly did not want to start off his tenure in Troy like this.In spite of all this failure, one of the surprising qualities that has defined these Trojans is their ability to continue playing hard. The on-court product has been abysmal at times, but no one watching a USC basketball game this season has seen the apathy that plagued the Trojans during the Kevin O’Neill era.Enfield, for his part, is continuing to see the silver lining in his team’s play, continuing to find signs of progress.“We’ve improved defensively,” Enfield added. “The last four games, we held opponents to 40 percent shooting.”Freshman phenom Nikola Jovanovic has been a big help in that category, and he too is choosing to remain positive and look forward to the next game.“When we do everything that Coach says in the locker room, we play real well,” the Belgrade, Serbia native said.Jovanovic’s early success is a good sign for the future of the program, proving that there is a light at the end of the USC basketball tunnel. But that light probably won’t shine for another couple of years.“Everyone wants to see our men’s basketball program be successful,” said USC Athletic Director Pat Haden of the team’s progress. “But it’s not going to happen overnight.”Fans can look forward to that success in the future. For now, they’ll settle for a simple win at the Galen Center tonight.last_img read more