first_imgRampant Razzle won the An-Cu Veterinary 525 Final, the feature race at tonight’s greyhound racing in Lifford.Crossing the finish line in 28.97 seconds, the 6/1 outsider, owned and trained by Mark Duffy, had three lengths to spare from 5/4 favourite Turbine Tulip, owned and trained by Willie Foley.Tonight’s results were: Race 1 (350 yards): 1, Friend of Jack 5/2; 2, Pollys Ace 3/1. Time: 19.63. Distance: half a length.Race 2 Buy a Buster 350 (350 yards): 1, Gilti Aero 4.6 fav; 2, Fridays Berlin 2/1. Time: 18.94. Distance: 5 lengths.Race 3 The Try a Trio 525 (525 yards): 1, Hather for Luck 9/4 fav; 2, Tommylees Buddy 4/1. Time: 29.73. Distance: half a length.Race 4 The Booking Office 525 (525 yards): 1, Whoop Whoop 2/1; 2, Hather Eve 4/1. Time: 29.04. Distance: 3.35 lengths. Race 5 “Like” Us on Facebook 525 (525 yards): 1, Barberfort Rock 6/4 fav; 2, Drumsna Royal 7/2. Time: 29.25. Distance: a length.Race 6 The Lifford €10 Sizzler Deal 350 (350 yards): 1, Backdoor Bucko 5/1; 2, China Moments 4/1. Time: 19.29. Distance: 1.75 lengths.Race 7 The Upcoming Sweepstakes (525 yards): 1, Tahina Sabrina 5/2; 2, Thrill Me 3/1. Time 28.79. Distance: 4 lengths.Race 8 The Lifford €15 Special (525 yards): 1, Corrin Gooch 5/4 fav; 2, Hather Lock 3/1. Time: 28.88. Distance: 2.5 lengths.Race 9 The Ultimate Dining Experience 525 (525 yards): 1, Hather Two Bake 3/1; 2, Ill Get That 5/2. Time: 28.85. Distance: 1.25 lengths. Race 10 The An-Cu Veterinary 525 Final (525 yards): 1, Rampant Razzle 6/1; Turbine Tulip 5/4 fav. Time: 28.97. Distance: 3.25 lengths.Race 11 www.liffordgreyhound.com 525 (525 yards): 1, Fridays Warsaw 1/1 fav; 2, Mullrook Dabhoyo 5/1. Time: 29.15. Distance: a short head.Race 12 The Getting Out 575 Bumper Stakes (575 yards): 1, Another Choice 4/1; 2, Budders Reward 5/1. Time: 32.14. Distance: a length.GREYHOUND RACING: TONIGHT’S LIFFORD RESULTS was last modified: July 26th, 2014 by johngerardShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:greyhoundLiffordResultslast_img read more

first_imgInitial results of Cassini’s March 12 flyby of Enceladus have been published.  You can watch a replay of today’s press briefing, read the blog, and read illustrated bulletins about the organic material, chemical signatures, hot spot locations, the stellar occultation (see also the Quicktime animation).  Another article shows the plume locations.  An astrobiologist (Chris McKay) added his speculations about life.  The encounter preview page contains links to more information, including the flyby details (PDF), and the video page contains an eye-grabbing animation of the flyby sequence as it was programmed with each instrument’s activities.  Here is the rundown on the major findings:The hot spots align predominantly right along the “tiger stripe” fractures at the south pole.The highest temperatures lie at certain points along the tiger stripes where plumes have been seen.Temperatures are hotter than earlier measurements: -135° F. (compared to a background temperature of less than -300° F.).  This indicates a great deal of energy is being transferred from the interior.Some transverse warm areas were detected, oriented perpendicular to the stripes.The material jets out at over 1000 mph and was strong enough to produce a measurable torque on Cassini, 120 miles away.Though most of the jets consist of ice grains 1/10,000 of an inch in diameter, simple organics were detected (methane, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde) and some complex organics (propane, propyne, acetylene).No ammonia was found.  Scientists had hoped that ammonia might depress the melting point of water and make the plumes easier to explain.The plumes appear to emerge from localized regions about half a tennis court in area, but extended along narrow strips within the tiger stripes.Though this brief press flurry did not mention it, Cassini also took a gorgeous mosaic of the north pole of Enceladus – including areas not previously imaged at high resolution.  The mosaic can be seen at the Imaging Team catalog page for March 13.    Leader of the INMS (Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer) instrument Hunter Waite (Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio) was most surprised that the chemical brew emerging from the plumes resembles that of a comet.  Enceladus is obviously not a comet.  He described the cocktail as being “like carbonated water with an essence of natural gas.”    At this time, no one speculated about the origin of the plumes or how they could be maintained for billions of years.  John Spencer of the CIRS team (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) did say that the temperatures could be hotter further down enough to allow for liquid water.    Water – that was the magic word.  The astrobiologists kicked into gear.  “Enceladus has got warmth, water and organic chemicals, some of the essential building blocks needed for life,” said Dennis Matson, project scientist (cf. 03/19/2008).  “We have quite a recipe for life on our hands, but we have yet to find the final ingredient, liquid water, but Enceladus is only whetting our appetites for more.”  These thoughts were also echoed on the NASA TV press briefing as if scripted.  Matson and astrobiologist Chris McKay in a related feature talked about the feasibility of exotic life and contrasted the “primordial soup theory” with the “deep sea vent theory.”  Either theory would work on Enceladus, they claimed.  The confidence that life is nearly inevitable contrasted starkly against an admitted background of ignorance and controversy: “We don’t know how long it takes for life to start when the ingredients are there and the environment is suitable, but it appears to have happened quickly on Earth,” the article said.  Then, with a bow to a Darwin metaphor, it continued, “So maybe it was possible that on Enceladus, life started in a ‘warm little pond’ below the icy surface occurring over the last few tens of millions of years.”  More observations will be needed, of course.    And indeed, more observations are on the way.  A series of close encounters with Enceladus has been planned during Cassini’s extended mission, which begins (pending final approval) on July 1.  The next is in August.  The cameras, which were not the prime instruments for the recent flyby, will have a chance to take extreme high-resolution photos of the tiger stripes, and the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA), which failed to operate, will get one more optimal chance to collect geyser particles.  Seven more close flybys are planned through 2009.    The March 12 encounter dipped 30 miles from the surface at closest approach; some of the daring flybys to come will be even closer – fast, low, and maybe even more thrilling.  The little 300-mile-wide moon Enceladus seems to be a strong contender for Best Actor of the Saturn awards.Good grief, Enceladus has nothing to do with life.  This is the distracting emotional appeal like the scantily-clad woman beside the truck at the used car lot.  NASA throws in the distraction at every mention of the word water in a vain belief that it will garner public support for the space program.  As could be expected, right on cue, National Geographic News picked up on this theme as the major aspect of the story.  Dave Mosher at Space.com even said “seeds of life found near Saturn.”  Incredible.  All they found was poison gas like methane and acetylene, folks!  Go experiment with your barbecue.  Write us if anything crawls out except the spider that took up residence there over the winter.    The scientists totally avoided the age issue today.  John Spencer has frankly admitted being completely baffled and embarrassed that the science community has no answer for where this little moon got its energy, or for how it could maintain it over billions of years.  Their plight has only gotten worse since the discovery of the plumes in 2005.  Recall that yesterday (03/25/2008, footnote to main entry) we highlighted a new paper in next month’s Icarus that struck down both tidal heating and radioactivity – the leading theoretical possibilities – as plausible sources of the heat.  That makes the scientists’ focus on exotic life even more distracting, as if the emperor, once exposed, quickly points to the sky and waxes eloquent about how the cloud shapes appear so very lifelike.  Let’s watch instead how his minions are going to robe their little embarrassment now that King Billions-of-Years has mooned the crowd.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The hot days and muggy nights of late have certainly all but erased now distant memories of the late frost that punctuated the cool, wet spring planting season. Even though harvest season is drawing near, it may not hurt to review the crops that were hurt by the late frost in the not-so-distant past to see if any lessons can be learned for the future.May 16, 2016 is not a date Levi Runkle will soon forget. He is an agronomist for Tri Ag Products in London and he spent the day looking at frost damage in customer’s fields. He is still haunted by what he saw in his corn field that night when he got home.“That particular field was one of the best fields I have ever had in terms of emergence, stand count and population. Even the morning of the 16th it looked great when it had a little frost on it,” Runkle said. “But that night about 8:00 I came back and it was a punch in the gut. It looked pretty bad. I work with customers all the time and tell them that it will be alright, but when it is your own field it is a little different feeling. You could row it great the morning of the 16th and it looked awesome. By the 17th you couldn’t row it. You couldn’t even tell anything had been planted in some places.”After more assessment in the following days, the field looked like a total loss on the surface and multiple people (including the insurance adjuster) said it was a clear replant situation. But according to Ohio State University Extension, the best way to assess the impact of freezing temperatures on emerged corn is to check plants about five days after the freezing injury occurred and observe the condition of the growing point by splitting seedlings lengthwise. If the growing point appears white to light yellow and firm several days after the frost, prognosis for recovery is good.Ohio State University Extension corn specialist Peter Thomison said that corn as far along as the V1 stage (one leaf collar visible) survived freezing soil temperatures with little impact on crop performance or plant stand.“Agronomists generally downplay the impact of low temperature injury in corn because the growing point is at or below the soil surface until V6, and thereby relatively safe from freezing air temperatures,” Thomison said. “Moreover, the cell contents of corn plants can sometimes act as an ‘antifreeze’ to allow temperatures to drop below 32 degrees F before tissue freezes, but injury to corn is often fatal when temperatures drop to 28 degrees F or lower for even a few minutes.”A bit of digging below the surface in Runkle’s field showed good results, but there was still significant skepticism about not replanting the field.“Three days later it was ugly and my neighbors thought it was all dead, but we still had a root system under there and we still had a lot going for us. As we started digging, the stems were still good. They were still intact with a lot of good color to them and they weren’t squishy. I was doing a lot of reading at night, reviewing the things I learned in school and talking to agronomists. The growing point was still under the ground, so I just needed a little time and faith,” he said. “By May 26, though, insurance companies were looking at it and saying that it needed to all be replanted. Replanting then would have lost us a whole month on the original planting date. The plants looked bad but the root system was still good. By May 31, the plants were looking better, but the field still needed torn up according to some people.”But Runkle held strong on the belief that the sound root system and the struggling field just needed more time.The field today, though, looks great after the decision to not replant.“After two or three weeks, it came back up and some of the leaves were curled and it still looked bad. After three weeks it started catching up with the rest of the crop and now it looks great. If we would have replanted then we would have lost the great root system we had. It had been planted around April 20 to 24. Even though it looked bad above ground, it still had a great root system below ground and I wouldn’t trade that for anything going into the hot, dry conditions we saw in July,” he said. “By July 14, you really had to look to find the areas that were frost damaged. It really came back. We had fairly good pollination conditions for that corn and the root system was able to capitalize on the little water we did get. I feel a whole lot better now about not replanting that. If I’d have corn planted a month later, it would have been headed into the hot, dry 90-degree temperatures for pollination. That earlier corn was already pollinated before the heat.”Ultimately, the stand counts had been reduced by the frost, but not at levels great enough to justify replanting.“We might have lost 10% or 15% in the worst parts of the field. We would have needed to see around a 50% loss to warrant replanting that late in the season. From what it looks like today after not replanting I think we are in pretty good shape,” Runkle said. “We would have had to have a really low population to warrant a replant a month later. Where we are now is above 30,000 population and we have a lot more potential with that than a stand that was planted a month later.”While leaving Runkle’s initial corn stand was clearly the way to go, soybeans in the frosted areas did not fare so well. If frost damage occurs above the soybean cotyledons, the plant will likely recover. It will not recover if damaged below the cotyledon.“Beans were a little more of a problem with that frost, especially in a no-till situation with a lot of residue. For the most part, beans that were frosted in that situation needed to be replanted,” Runkle said of his customers’ fields. “There were still some surprises though, where the frost didn’t quite get all of the growing point, or maybe it wasn’t all of the way out of the ground and it looked bad on the cotyledons but once that opened up there was still a good growing point there. Some of those beans surprised us and the beans came back and didn’t need replanting.”Some wheat fields also took a hit.“We had some record wheat yields, with great quality this year and good straw. But, in the areas where it was flowering when it got frosted, especially in the lower areas of the field, we had about half the yield we had everywhere else. We had a lot of issues and it was hard to tell the effect of the frost when it happened because we did not have much experience with a frost on wheat when it was flowering. We learned a lot about that this year,” Runkle said. “With wheat, we had to search far and wide to find anyone with experience with flowering wheat getting frosted. There was purpling on May 18 after being frosted. It looked a little bit like head scab, but it was frost damage. It really did hurt the wheat in some areas where the wheat was flowering when it frosted.”What is now almost forgotten by some has proven to be a great learning experience for Runkle for his fields and the fields of his customers in the future.“We are going to keep track of things in that field and pull some ears on that corn,” he said. “But as of right now, I think we’re doing pretty well.”last_img read more

first_imgI don’t want to give up my desktop computer, but it seems like many people do.Dan Frommer at SplatFlays it all out: The PC industry is in decline. The Mac, which was growing while the rest of PCs were shrinking, is now shrinking, too. But if you add in the iPad and count all of Apple’s “computers” at once, the numbers are through the roof.It’s pretty clear what all this means. As Steve Jobs said, PCs are trucks, and tablets are cars. Most people don’t drive around in trucks. But the ones who drive trucks need great ones, and that’s where Apple is starting to focus its Mac efforts exclusively.Here in the U.S., at the peak of the George W. Bush era (remember him?), a trend began where people whose jobs entailed parking their car, going inside, and doing something on a computer began driving hulking monster trucks designed to resemble military assault vehicles. But after realizing over decades how much unnecessary energy those SUVs consumed, the trend swung back, and now many people conspicuously drive little hybrids instead.Consumer products can be like that. Trends swing back and forth like a pendulum as new technology becomes available to meet people’s tastes.The Tablet TrendWhat we see in Frommer’s amazing charts is the adoption of just such a trend. Yes, it may be that Mac sales declined 22% in 2012, the biggest drop in 10 years, but that fall in Mac consumption can’t come close to accounting for the soaring iPad numbers. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces jon mitchell Tags:#Apple#iPad#Mac The Real PC MarketSince the “what is a PC?” argument is not yet resolved, I propose this definition: A PC is a computer with a multi-window workspace and a pixel-precise input method. For now, though I think this part can change with good-enough voice interfaces, let’s include a physical keyboard, too.The PC market is surely subject to trends, but that 22% drop in Mac sales is not the end of the Mac trend. Apple knows that as well as anybody. In 2012, Apple shipped the first Macs with retina displays and a striking new iMac, which, as CEO Tim Cook pointed out in the Q1 2013 earnings call was not available for most of the quarter in which the low Mac numbers were reported.Why would Apple ship those products in a down year, fighting the clear trend against PCs? Because today’s PC market is the real PC market. The people who still buy PCs actually need them. It might be a pretty hard crash for low-margin PC manufacturers, but for Apple, with high-end Macs bolstered by roaring iPhone and iPad businesses, it’s just a chance to build the best, most powerful PCs it has ever made.And that’s not to say that Windows PCs are finished, either. It just means they have to be excellent enough for an increasingly high-end market.Lead image by Eliot Weisberg for ReadWrite. Chart courtesy of Splatf. Bottom image from Apple.  Certainly, there’s a use case for a tablet that replaces the point-and-click PC completely. It does a better job for lots of people, since the battery lasts all day and it fits in a handbag. Apple should be thrilled to sacrifice Mac sales in exchange for selling iPads to those people. The company is even betting that this trend will take a bite out of the enterprise PC market, and it seems a pretty safe bet.But the iPad was not the first $500 portable computer. It may (seriously) be the best one, but its astronomical adoption rate is not simply driven by the sudden realization by tens of millions of people that they can be more efficient workers on this device.Tablets are also entertainment systems. They’re an elective choice, like the choice of a Hummer or Prius over a used Honda. They’re trendy.Likewise, not everyone who bought a white plastic MacBook needed all its capabilities. They needed some of them, which a $300 Windows netbook also offered, and they wanted some of them, like the ability to watch Netflix in bed. But those people have the iPad now. It’s a better choice for those uses. And Apple doesn’t have to make that Mac at all anymore.center_img Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

first_imgDREAM TEAM: (From left) Dravid, Kumble, Akram and Younis will represent AsiaThe stunning millennium stadium in Wales, originally meant for soccer and rugby, is becoming an increasingly popular venue for another unlikely sport: international indoor cricket or power cricket.The retractable roof allows play in England’s unpredictable weather, which is why,DREAM TEAM: (From left) Dravid, Kumble, Akram and Younis will represent AsiaThe stunning millennium stadium in Wales, originally meant for soccer and rugby, is becoming an increasingly popular venue for another unlikely sport: international indoor cricket or power cricket.The retractable roof allows play in England’s unpredictable weather, which is why DP Cricket, a sports marketing agency, is planning a power cricket tournament on January 25 and 26 between Asia and the Rest of the World.Asia will comprise six Pakistani and six Indian players, including Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis, Inza-mam-ul-Haq, Azhar Mahmood and Shahid Afridi from Pakistan, and Anil Kumble, Rahul Dravid, Mohammed Kaif, Yuvraj Singh, Dinesh Mongia and Virender Sehwag from India.The Rest of the World team will include Courtney Walsh, Stephen Fleming, Nathan Astle and Lance Klusener. It doesn’t get better than this. Last year’s match – when it was held for the first time – lived up to expectations.Says Walsh, former West Indies captain: “I am delighted to play in the international indoor matches at the Millennium Stadium. I have fond memories of playing Test and county cricket in England – but not the time spent in pavilions waiting for the rain to stop. Indoor cricket guarantees action for players and fans alike, and is an exciting way forward.”Exciting or not, the shorter version of one-day cricket is certainly gaining popularity. Each game lasts approximately five hours and in power cricket rain never stops play.last_img read more