first_imgChairperson of the Glenties Municipal District Cllr Marie Therese Gallagher has welcomed progress in establishing a Community Action Plan for West Donegal.In July of this year the members of the Glenties Area Council agreed to proceed with a Community Action Plan for West Donegal and The wider Gaeltacht region.Speaking after meeting with officials from Donegal County Council, Cllr Gallagher said “The aim of this plan is to consult with communities across the region to identify a priority action plan that can be implemented when funding opportunities come along. “Donegal County Council is presently putting together terms of reference for the public consultation which will be before the November meeting of the Municipal District meeting. Donegal County Council is working with other agencies to agree a joint approach to the development of this plan.”Cllr Gallagher concluded by stating “The objective of this plan is to ensure that local communities are at the forefront of the decision making when funding opportunities arise, I would be hoping through the public meetings that community groups, businesses and citizens will engage in the process to ensure that the best plan for the area can be put in place.”Action on Community Plan for West Donegal welcomed was last modified: September 29th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — If Bruce Bochy spent spring training envisioning a magical last ride as the Giants’ manager, it didn’t take long for his team to dash his hopes.As the Giants hit the halfway point of the regular season on Friday, Bochy explained his frustration in the way the first 80 games have unfolded.“We’re disappointed,” Bochy admitted. “We look at a lot of these games and think we should have and could have won. A mistake here or there, just not quite executing with little things. That …last_img read more

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device It’s called “The Sixth Man” and Iguodala pitched the book hither and yon last week. The title explains exactly why Iguodala, even at 35, would be an attractive pick-up for the … In the past couple days Andre Iguodala has been traded from the Warriors to the Memphis Grizzlies. Speculation is the 15-year NBA veteran may land with the Lakers, or maybe Houston.He should write a book. Oh wait, he just did.last_img read more

first_img(Visited 442 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Robot designers know that making things big is easy, but making them small is hard. How do you pack a multitude of capabilities in a tiny space? Consider these little guys.Tarantulas have eight eyes that are simple (like human eyes) instead of compound. Researchers found that they use their lateral eyes to calculate distance.Lycosa tarantula, a wolf spider found in Spain, hunts by ambushing its prey and dragging its meal back to its 20cm-deep burrow. Finding the way back, however, can be a math problem after darting this way and that in the chase. Science Daily says it “uses path integration to return to its burrow.” Did this little creature ace trigonometry class? “With this mechanism, it does not follow the same path back to its burrow; instead, it moves as though it had followed the sides of a right-angle triangle, returning along the hypotenuse.” Scientists in Madrid ran experiments in the lab. It must have been fun trying to paint the lateral eyes shut on these speedy runners. The researchers put the spiders through their paces on specially-designed arrays of black and white bands. What they found reveals an astonishing array of instruments packed into a tiny space:“To calculate the distance it has travelled, the animal needs an odometer that registers the route, its location with respect to the finish point, which would be the burrow, and a ‘compass‘ to track the direction of travel,” according to Joaquin Ortega Escobar, lead author of a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology on the function of each eye in these processes.The ‘compass’ would correspond to polarised light, which the median eyes use to measure the angle; direction is detected by the anterior lateral eyes. Through this research, the scientists have learned that it is principally the anterior lateral eyes (which until now had not been analysed), and to a lesser extent the posterior lateral eyes, that help tarantula wolf spiders measures the distance to their nest.Mosquitoes have some of the fastest wings in nature. Much as we despise them, we have to have a grudging admiration for a tiny creature that can flap wings 800 beats a second—four times faster than insects of a similar size. In Nature, Laura A. Miller describes efforts to understand the flight mechanics of mosquitoes (many species of which do not bite humans). Despite the fast wingbeats, which make that annoying whine, the thin wings only employ strokes of about 40° in amplitude—much shorter than in other flying insects. Science Daily says that the researchers at Oxford University, curious about the narrow wings and short beats, “predicted that they must make use of clever tricks as the wings reverse their direction at the end of each half-stroke.”How can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes?In particular, the researchers wondered how they get enough lift. Even a mosquito needs lift to fly. The answer, they found with cameras running at 10,000 frames a second, was by a rotation mechanism in the wing attachment muscle that induces vortices on both forward and backward strokes, gaining lift in both directions. This sounds similar to what Illustra Media demonstrated in far larger animals, hummingbirds (see Flight: The Genius of Birds). Miller compares it to the force one feels holding a hand out the window of a moving car, rotating it into and out of the wind. The researchers (who must have had amazing technology to measure lift on such minuscule wings) found that mosquitoes actually employ three mechanisms to get all the lift they can: (1) leading-edge vortex, (2) wake capture, and (3) rotational drag—a trick unique to mosquitoes.Could drone designers learn from these tricks of the mosquito? “Mosquito-flight investigations are certainly on their way to generating plenty of future research buzz,” Miller quips.Honeybees have better eyesight than thought, Science Daily reports. They can clearly discern objects at angles of a mere 1.9°, as small as your thumb at arm’s length, but that’s not all; they can make out objects at just 0.6° almost as well, a third as wide. This is 30% better than earlier thought, according to an Australian team that gave eye tests to bees. “Among other things, honey bees help to answer questions such as: how can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes, and what are its utmost limits? In the last few decades it has been shown that bees can see and categorize objects and learn concepts through vision, such as the concept of ‘symmetric’ and ‘above and below’….“Photoreceptors in the visual system detect variations in light intensity. There are eight photoreceptors beyond each hexagonal facet of a bee’s compound eye, and their eyes are made out of thousands of facets!“Butterflies have an amazing mouthpart called the proboscis that lets them slurp nectar like drinking through a straw. Only they don’t need to suck; the proboscis is designed to bring fluid in automatically, by capillary action. These mouthparts are clearly shown in Illustra Media’s documentary Metamorphosis, which shows how after hatching from the chrysalis, the proboscis emerges in half-channels. The butterfly uses other mouthparts called palpi to knit the two halves together into a single channel. The proboscis can be rolled up into a neat little circle like a hose reel, and extended for use.Recently, Phys.org tried to unravel other mysteries of the mouthparts of butterflies. And like the “bee team” reported above, researchers at Kent State (UK) wanted to learn about this to imitate it. “An insect’s proboscis, a body part that allows them to drink liquids, acts like a highly-sophisticated sponge and straw that uses capillary action to send nectar or other liquids to the insect’s digestive system,” the team says. The channel size is crucially important for the type of liquid the insect needs to drink.The team’s findings show that capillary action is an essential and ideal method for removing small amounts of fluids from surfaces, Lehnert said. By copying this natural method, scientists say the mouthparts of flies and butterflies can serve as models for developing new devices for improved drug delivery systems.Even though engineers can only approach the efficiency of the butterfly proboscis, Lehnert attributed the insect’s design to evolution. “In order to feed on nectar and other liquid films, natural selection has favored the evolution of specialized mouthparts in fluid-feeding insects,” the press release writer says. Then Lehnert mixes convergent evolution with personification to portray natural selection as a refining agent:“It was previously known that flies and butterflies independently evolved mouthparts adapted for feeding on fluids, but what was unknown before our study was that they both use the same principles for ingesting fluids – capillary action,” Lehnert said. “Our findings have applications to the production of novel microfluidic devices that can be developed to mimic the functionality of insect mouthparts, which have the advantage of being impacted by natural selection over millions of years.“Ants rescue their dead. Did you know that? Neither did scientists; Phys.org reports that researchers in Europe, studying African ants, didn’t expect to see this. “We have observed helping behaviour vis-à-vis injured animals for the first time in invertebrates,” one said. For social insects where nest members are clones with no individuality, this is quite amazing; “obviously, it pays off for the colony as a whole to invest in the rescue service,” they say. The ants’ triage service will sound remarkably familiar to those in the human military:When an ant is injured in a fight, it will “call” its mates for help by excreting chemical substances. The injured insect is then carried back to the nest where it can recover after receiving treatment. What is the “therapy” like? Usually, treatment involves removing the termites still clinging to the ant.Dung Beetles seem disgusting, rolling balls of poop around to feed on, but they actually play a part in the balance of nature. And they have an amazing trick that has come to the light of science: they navigate by the Milky Way. Really! At The Conversation, James Foster of Lund University describes experiments to figure out how they do it. His team created an artificial Milky Way sky to watch them under controlled conditions. They found that it isn’t constellations that guide them, but the brightness patterns between the Milky Way and the other parts of the sky that help them orient themselves, so that they can roll their ball in a straight line.This brightness-comparison strategy may be less sophisticated than the way birds and human sailors identify specific constellations, but it’s an efficient solution to interpreting the complex information present in the starry sky—given how small the beetles’ eyes and brains are. In this way, they overcome the limited bandwidth of their information processing systems and do more with less, just as humans have learnt to do with technology.So there you have it: insects and arachnids with remarkable superpowers, using well-designed equipment. The genius in these animals is so good, scientists study it in order to copy it. Knowing what we have learned, it makes it hard to swat, step on, or spray these sophisticated little living robots.Don’t feel too sorry for that mosquito after your blood. This is not the “very good” world of the original creation before the Fall. Still, God has left enough evidence of his creative power to stand in awe of his wisdom. It should draw us to seek him, humble ourselves, repent, and trust in his way of escape from the consequences of sin.last_img read more

first_img13 May 2016At WEF Africa 2016 in Kigali, Rwanda, Ugandan journalist Nancy Kacungira asked the audience just how many of the cars, clothes or coffees they drink has a label that says “Made in Africa”. Not many.There may be one-billion people living in Africa but its production output is just 1.5%. She said leaders are trying to change this with some success, but there are some challenges.Kacungira speaks to Namibian entrepreneur Ally Angula, Dutch businessman Johan C. Aurik and the CEO of the Industrial Development Corporation in South Africa, Geoffrey Qhena, on the future of production in Africa.They address the way new technologies are transforming the world’s manufacturing systems, how governments can facilitate home-grown innovation and what Africa’s role will be in the fourth industrial revolution.South Africa.info reporterlast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture will soon begin aerial treatments designed to control the gypsy moth population in Ohio.  Treatments on 1,308 acres in Licking County will begin in late April or early May, as larva and leaf development reaches the optimal threshold for treatment.Treatments are administered using a low-flying aircraft that flies just above tree tops. High humidity, low temperature and minimal wind are crucial for a successful application. Treatment will most likely take place during early morning hours.The department will use Foray (Btk), a naturally occurring bacterium found in the soil that interferes with the caterpillars’ feeding cycles. These treatments are not toxic to humans, pets, birds or fish.Ohioans can view maps of treatment blocks at www.agri.ohio.gov. Daily updates on treatment progress across the state are available on the website or by calling 614-387-0907 or 1-800-282-1955, ext. 37, any time after 5 p.m.Gypsy moths are invasive insects that defoliate over 300 species of trees and shrubs. In its caterpillar stage, the moth feeds on the leaves of trees and shrubs and is especially fond of oak. A healthy tree can usually withstand only two years of defoliation before it is permanently damaged or dies. In Ohio, 51 counties are currently under gypsy moth quarantine regulations.The department uses three programs to manage the gypsy moth population in Ohio. The suppression program is used in counties where the pest is already established, but landowners voluntarily request treatment to help suppress populations. The second program, slow-the-spread, occurs in counties in front of the larger, advancing gypsy moth population. The third program is the eradication program, used in counties where isolated populations develop ahead of advancing moth populations due to human movement of the moth. Officials work to detect and control isolated populations to slow the overall advancement of the gypsy moth infestation.For more information about the gypsy moth or for specific treatment locations, visit www.agri.ohio.gov.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Scattered showers remain over Ohio today. Additional moisture from a few hundredths to half an inch can be seen with 90% coverage. We should start to see skies turn partly sunny this afternoon over the western third of the state, as moisture ends there sooner.  Tomorrow we see increasing clouds, and then scattered showers emerge with a minor trough passage. We can see up to .25” of moisture over about 60% of the state, but most of that will be mid to late afternoon or perhaps a bit later.  We turn out partly to mostly sunny, dry and warm from Friday through Sunday. Temps normal to above normal.  Monday turns out partly sunny, but we cant rule out a few scattered showers, mostly in the late afternoon and evening.  The best chance of rain, both in terms of coverage and quantity comes overnight next Monday night through Tuesday. Showers and thunderstorms bring .25”-1.25” of moisture to 90% of the state. The map below shows 10 day rain potential. For the extended period, we have scattered showers from overnight next Friday night through Saturday morning, bringing .1”-.5” rain potential and 60% coverage. This is a lower rain outlook than our previous forecasts.  We turn drier again for Saturday afternoon and next Sunday. The rest of the extended window has the potential to be wetter, and models went wetter in the past 24 hours. However, we are waiting to see what additional data says, considering how dry our atmospheric profile is at the time. We think the forecast models will revert to a drier solution again, and for now we are keeping our extended forecast unchanged: partly to mostly sunny skies, and temps normal to slightly above normal. But we are watching closely the period from the 19th through the 22nd to see if we need to make changes in the future.last_img read more

first_imgLaura Grant is an assistant professor of economics at Claremont McKenna College. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. Other outcomes are mixedDST proponents also argue that changing times provides more hours for afternoon recreation and reduces crime rates. But time for recreation is a matter of preference. There is better evidence on crime rates: Fewer muggings and sexual assaults occur during DST months because fewer potential victims are out after dark.So overall, the net benefits from these three durational effects of crime, recreation, and energy use — that is, impacts that last for the duration of the time change — are murky.Other consequences of DST are ephemeral. I think of them as bookend effects, since they occur at the beginning and end of DST.When we “spring forward” in March we lose an hour, which comes disproportionately from resting hours rather than wakeful time. Therefore, many problems associated with springing forward stem from sleep deprivation. With less rest people make more mistakes, which appear to cause more traffic accidents and workplace injuries, lower workplace productivity due to cyberloafing, and poorer stock market trading.Even when we gain that hour back in the fall, we must readjust our routines over several days because the sun and our alarm clocks feel out of synchronization. Some impacts are serious: During bookend weeks, children in higher latitudes go to school in the dark, which increases the risk of pedestrian casualties. Dark commutes are so problematic for pedestrians that New York City is spending $1.5 million on a related safety campaign. And heart attacks increase after the spring time shift — it is thought because of lack of sleep — but decrease to a lesser extent after the fall shift. Collectively, these bookend effects represent net costs and strong arguments against retaining DST. By LAURA GRANTOn November 6, public service announcements reminded us to “fall back,” ending daylight saving time (DST) by setting our clocks an hour earlier. On November 7, many of us commuted home in the dark.This semiannual ritual shifts our rhythms and temporarily makes us groggy at times when we normally feel alert. Moreover, many Americans are confused about why we spring forward to DST in March and fall back in November, and whether it is worth the trouble.The practice of resetting clocks is not designed for farmers, whose plows follow the sun regardless of what time clocks say it is. Yet many people continue to believe that farmers benefit, including lawmakers during recent debates over changing California DST laws. Massachusetts is also studying whether to abandon DST.Changing our clocks does not create extra daylight. DST simply shifts when the sun rises and sets relative to our society’s regular schedule and routines. The key question, then, is how people respond to this enforced shift in natural lighting. Most people have to be at work at a certain time — say, 8:30 a.m. — and if that time comes an hour earlier, they simply get up an hour earlier. The effect on society is another question, and there, the research shows that DST is more burden than boon. Pick your own time zone?Spurred by many of these arguments, several states are considering unilaterally discontinuing DST. The California State Legislature considered a bill this term that would have asked voters to decide whether or not to remain on Pacific Standard Time year-round (the measure was passed by the State Assembly but rejected by the Senate).On the East Coast, Massachusetts has commissioned research on the impacts of dropping DST and joining Canada’s Maritime provinces on Atlantic Time, which is one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. If this occurred, Massachusetts would be an hour ahead of all of its neighboring states during winter months, and travelers flying from Los Angeles to Boston would cross five time zones.These proposals ignore a fundamental fact: Daylight saving time relies on coordination. If one state changes its clocks a week early, neighboring states will be out of sync.Some states have good reason for diverging from the norm. Notably, Hawaii does not practice DST because it is much closer to the equator than the rest of the nation, so its daylight hours barely change throughout the year. Arizona is the sole contiguous state that abstains from DST, citing its extreme summer temperatures. Although this disparity causes confusion for western travelers, the state’s residents have not changed clocks’ times for over 40 years.In my research on DST I have found that everyone has strong opinions about it. Many people welcome the shift to DST as a signal of spring. Others like the coordinated availability of daylight after work. Dissenters, including farmers, curse their loss of quiet morning hours.When the evidence about costs and benefits is mixed but we need to make coordinated choices, how should we make DST decisions? When the California State Senate opted to stick with DST, one legislator stated, “I like daylight savings. I just like it.” But politicians’ whims are not a good basis for policy choices.The strongest arguments support not only doing away with the switches but keeping the nation on daylight saving time year-round. Yet humans adapt. If we abandon the twice-yearly switch, we may eventually slide back into old routines and habits of sleeping in during daylight. Daylight saving time is the coordinated alarm to wake us up a bit earlier in the summer and get us out of work with more sunshine. No energy savingsBenjamin Franklin was one of the first thinkers to endorse the idea of making better use of daylight. Although he lived well before the invention of light bulbs, Franklin observed that people who slept past sunrise wasted more candles later in the evening. He also whimsically suggested the first policy fixes to encourage energy conservation: firing cannons at dawn as public alarm clocks and fining homeowners who put up window shutters.To this day, our laws equate daylight saving with energy conservation. However, recent research suggests that DST actually increases energy use.This is what I found in a study co-authored with Yale economist Matthew Kotchen. We used a policy change in Indiana to estimate DST effects on electricity consumption. Prior to 2007, most Indiana counties did not observe DST. By comparing households’ electricity demand before and after DST was adopted, month by month, we showed that DST had actually increased residential electricity demand in Indiana by 1% to 4% annually.The largest effects occurred in the summer, when DST aligns our lives with the hottest part of the day, so people tend to use more air conditioning, and late fall, when we wake up in the dark and use more heating with no reduction in lighting needs.Other studies corroborate these findings. Research in Australia and in the United States shows that DST does not decrease total energy use. However, it does smooth out peaks and valleys in energy demand throughout the day, as people at home use more electricity in the morning and less during the afternoon. Though people still use more electricity, shifting the timing reduces the average costs to deliver energy because not everyone demands it during typical peak usage periods.last_img read more

first_imgBSE Institute, Mumbai has announced the launch of a Post Graduate Program in Business Journalism. Spread across four modules, this will be a full-time one year autonomous programme.The last date for receiving applications is August 20, 2012. The programme is expected to commence in the last week of August.The faculty for this program will comprise reputable practitioners from the industry.This program will provide required knowledge and understanding of financial products, develop analytical skills and build a professional ttitude amongst students.For further information, visit http://pgpbj.bsebti.comlast_img read more