first_imgStuff co.nz 24 April 2016At least one potential surrogate has volunteered to be impregnated with sperm frozen before promising Auckland teenage filmmaker Cameron Duncan died 12 years ago.The offers have breathed life into grieving mother Sharon Duncan’s dreams of creating a grandchild using her dead son’s sperm, which he banked when aged 15 before starting chemotherapy for bone cancer in 2002.“They’ve had time to think about it, as the years have gone by.“I think it’s really cool, I don’t have to go to a stranger – it’s someone in our circle,” she said.If Cameron hadn’t lost his cancer fight in November 2003 when only 17 years old, he would have celebrated his 30th birthday this week, a milestone that has proved a sharp reminder to his mother that time is passing swiftly.“He was an amazing young man who inspired many, many people through his films… I could think of nothing better than to produce a child from him,” Sharon said.While New Zealand’s laws and regulations have blocked her plans to date, she has been granted an extra decade to keep his sperm frozen while she seeks a solution.“But I don’t want to don’t want to wait 10 years because by then I’ll be nearly 70,” Sharon said.“I’ve spent the last several years battling against irrelevant fertility reproductive laws in New Zealand, and I demand a change.”Cameron banked sperm in 2002 because he was warned his cancer treatment could destroy his fertility and he wanted children in his future.At the time, he signed a form at the fertility clinic gifting it to his mother if he died, but it failed to specify his frozen sperm’s use after death.His family had not discussed what to do with the sperm before his death because they were so focused on his survival.“The form he, and presumably, all other donors in 2002 signed, simply asked ‘in the case of your death, who do you leave the sperm to’, so he wrote my name,” Sharon said.A few years after Cameron’s death, Sharon inquired at a fertility clinic to see if she could use his sperm with a surrogate to produce offspring to raise, but was told it was deemed illegal.Under the 2004 Human Assisted Reproductive Technology (HART) Act, nobody has the right to use sperm stored by a minor aged under 16, except the person himself. An applicant to use the sperm has to show he gave consent for its use before dying.However, Sharon believes that law does not apply to her case because it was introduced after Cameron’s death.“I have always argued that he banked his sperm two years before that law existed, yet still [the Ethics Committee] maintain that ‘law’ remains applicable.“These rewrites did not exist at the time of his signing, how can they apply to me now?”Guidelines for the storage, use and disposal of sperm from a deceased man came into force in 2000, but they had no age specification.In 2014, the Ethics Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology granted her approval to keep her son’s sperm frozen for one year because a law change imposed a 10-year limit on storage of frozen gametes, embryos and other fertility tissue.At the time, she was told she would have to prove how she could overcome the legal hurdles to use her teenage son’s sperm without his consent.Last year, she sought another extension to keep the sperm frozen while she tried to make her dreams reality and was granted an extra 10 years.Since then, she has spoken to Russian doctor Lemara Kelesheva, who is raising four grandchildren in Moscow after using her dead son’s sperm to impregnate two surrogates, who both had twins in 2011.Her son had died of leukaemia in 2005 aged 23.Meanwhile, Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne said he was still waiting for more information before he could approve a proposed review of laws and regulations about collection, storage and use of gametes and embryos from dead and comatose people.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/79213114/surrogate-offers-to-be-impregnated-with-dead-teenage-filmmakers-sperm.htmllast_img read more

first_imgThe Pierce County Sheriff’s Department in Washington State is reporting that they have arrested a woman who posed as a photographer in an effort to kidnap a woman’s newborn.The Sheriff’s department says they began investigating the suspect who went by the name Juliette Parker on Facebook after the victim contacted them believing she may have been drugged by the suspect.The victim told authorities that she met Parker in a Facebook group where Parker advertised free newborn photo sessions because she wanted to build her photography portfolio.The victim told investigators that the suspect visited her home three times with her 16-year-old daughter and took selfies with the newborn. She also said that she noticed that the suspect would wipe her fingerprints off of everything she touched.On the third visit, Parker and her daughter brought the mother a cupcake and several moments after the victim ingested the cupcake she began feeling drowsy and numb.The victim then kicked the pair out of her home. While the suspect and her daughter did leave, the victim noticed that her house keys were missing and contacted the police believing she may have been drugged.After an investigation, authorities reported that they found evidence that there were several other victims and that the suspect planned to steal a newborn and raise it as her own:“Our detectives have worked tirelessly on this case, conducting multiple interviews and obtaining several search warrants,” the department said. “This detailed investigation identified additional victims and garnered evidence that indicate that the suspect was planning to steal a newborn baby to raise as her own.”last_img read more

first_imgFollowing the disheartening loss to crosstown rival UCLA, the USC men’s basketball team (10-13, 1-9 Pac-12) will host the Utah Utes (16-7, 5-6) today with hopes of getting their elusive second conference win and halting their current four-game snide.Shining example · Senior guard Pe’Shon Howard led the Trojans with 16 points, including perfect marks from the three-point and free-throw line, in USC’s 84-66 loss to Utah last month. Howard averages 10.5 points per game. – Jojo Korsh | Daily Trojan USC made a visit to Salt Lake City earlier in the season and walked out the losers by a score of 84-66. The Utes controlled the game the whole way, but, like most games for the Trojans, USC fought to stay within striking distance before eventually biting the dust.In that contest, the Trojans struggled to contain Utes guard Delon Wright, as the Los Angeles native dropped 22 points.“Delon Wright really put us in a bind,” said USC head coach Andy Enfield after the game. “He drove the ball really well — got to the foul line 11 times.”In general, it seemed to most that the better team won that contest.“I thought Utah played a good game,” Enfield said.The Utes are not necessarily one of the elite teams in the Pac-12, but the Trojans have no right to overlook any given team. The excitement that surrounded Enfield and his squad coming into this campaign quickly turned into embarrassment when conference play began.The Trojans’ 1-9 mark in Pac-12 play is one of the worst in recent memory. Enfield will be given a few seasons to bring in the type of players that fit his run-and-gun system, but he certainly did not want to start off his tenure in Troy like this.In spite of all this failure, one of the surprising qualities that has defined these Trojans is their ability to continue playing hard. The on-court product has been abysmal at times, but no one watching a USC basketball game this season has seen the apathy that plagued the Trojans during the Kevin O’Neill era.Enfield, for his part, is continuing to see the silver lining in his team’s play, continuing to find signs of progress.“We’ve improved defensively,” Enfield added. “The last four games, we held opponents to 40 percent shooting.”Freshman phenom Nikola Jovanovic has been a big help in that category, and he too is choosing to remain positive and look forward to the next game.“When we do everything that Coach says in the locker room, we play real well,” the Belgrade, Serbia native said.Jovanovic’s early success is a good sign for the future of the program, proving that there is a light at the end of the USC basketball tunnel. But that light probably won’t shine for another couple of years.“Everyone wants to see our men’s basketball program be successful,” said USC Athletic Director Pat Haden of the team’s progress. “But it’s not going to happen overnight.”Fans can look forward to that success in the future. For now, they’ll settle for a simple win at the Galen Center tonight.last_img read more