first_imgThe forward has not played for the Egyptian club as Sofapaka refused to hand him a release letter until the club paid a transfer fee for him, an issue that has literally dragged him off the playing contingent.Meanwhile, Matasi has been recalled for the two qualifiers after being rested for last month’s friendly against Mozambique. Yanga’s Faruk Shikalo has been dropped from the squad after his not so convincing performance as the starter in the Mozambique friendly.The squad named mostly has players who were part of the team that played in the Uganda and Mozambique friendlies, but there are a few new inclusions.AFC Leopards forward John Mark Makwatta receives his player of the month awarrd at the club’s training groundAFC Leopards striker John Mark Makwatta has been rewarded for his explosive start to the season and earns a return to the team for the first time in three years while there is a debut call up for Kariobangi Sharks defender Daniel Sakari.Midfielders Johannah Omollo and Ayub Timbe who were not part of the squad for the Mozambique friendly have also been recalled while former Tusker FC striker Boniface Muchiri who moved to the United States to join Golden State Arrows has also earned a place.Eric Johannah who was also overlooked for last month’s friendly match is also part of the preliminary squad.Full SquadGoalkeepers; Patrick Matasi (St. George SC, Ethiopia), Timothy Odhiambo (Ulinzi Stars, Kenya), Ian Otieno (Red Arrows, Zambia)Defenders; Johnstone Omurwa (Wazito, Kenya), Harun Shakava (Nkana, Zambia), Joash Onyango (Gor Mahia, Kenya), Daniel Sakari (Kariobangi Sharks, Kenya), Hillary Wandera (Tusker, Kenya), Erick Ouma (Vasalunds IF, Sweden), Joseph Okumu (IF Elfsborg, Sweden), Samuel Olwande (Kariobangi Sharks, Kenya)Midfielders; Teddy Akumu (Zesco United, Zambia), Johanna Omollo (Cercle Brugge, Belgium), Kenneth Muguna (Gor Mahia, Kenya), Ayub Timbe (Beijing Renhe, China), Victor Wanyama (Tottenham Hotspurs, England), Boniface Muchiri (Golden State Arrows, USA), Lawrence Juma (Gor Mahia, Kenya), Cliff Nyakeya (FC Masr, Egypt), Erick Johanna Omondi (IF Brommapojkarma, Sweden), Whyvone Isuza (AFC Leopards, Kenya)Forwards; Michael Olunga (Kashiwa Reysol, Japan), Jesse Were (Zesco United, Zambia), John Avire (Sofapaka, Kenya), John Mark Makwatta (AFC Leopards, Kenya).0Shares0000(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Harambee Stars striker John Avire during his debut against Madagascar in a friendly match at the Stade Robert Bobin in Paris on June 7, 2019. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 2 – Striker John Avire and goalkeeper Patrick Matasi have been recalled as Harambee Stars head coach Francis Kimanzi named his preliminary squad for the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier against Egypt and Togo this month.Avire has been missing since the team returned from the 2019 Cup of Nations as he tried to force a move to Egyptian side Tanta, but Kimanzi has handed him a life line though he is still listed as a Sofapaka player.last_img read more

first_imgIf phrases like “the conservation of conservatism” or “the production of productivity” leave you scratching your head, you may wear off a few hairs thinking about a paper in PNAS1 on the “evolution of evolvability.”  Entitled, “Is evolvability a selectable trait?”, this paper by two scientists at Rice University considers whether the rate of change of evolution can change.  (Pause here to think about that.)  In other words, can the ability of a population of critters to adapt to its environment quickly be selected by natural selection?  Might some critters become sluggish in their ability to change, while others develop flexibility in adapting to changing conditions?  Why is anyone even asking this question?    It’s not that no one has thought about this before, but the idea has been shrugged off by other evolutionists in the past.  How could a population plan ahead to be flexible?  For this reason, the authors seem a little defensive writing this paper:Whether the propensity to evolve, or evolvability, can be an object of Darwinian natural selection is a topic of interest.  Causality would suggest not because of the apparently anticipatory nature of evolvability.  Many within the field of evolutionary biology are uncomfortable with the concept that evolvability is a selectable trait.  A growing body of experimental data, however, would be explained if evolvability were a selectable trait.    Higher organisms cannot evolve, or adapt, by germ-line mutation to an environmental change within their own lifetime.  Does this mean that lineages and individuals cannot be under selection for evolvability?….….Although the use of the term evolvability has only recently come into vogue in the scientific community, investigations into the evolution of adaptation go back several decades.  Prominent from a theoretical perspective are works in population genetics and game theory [see 02/10/2004 headline].  Despite the insights that these studies give as to the origin and maintenance of evolvability, evolution of and selection for evolvability remains a contested issue primarily because of the causality principleSo the burden of proof is on them to show that evolvability evolves.  Their paper is primarily a mathematical model, similar to computer models of evolution (see 07/04/2004 headline).  A model is needed, they say, because of the difficulty of measuring the effect in the wild:Whether evolvability is selectable has been a difficult question to answer, primarily because observations in evolutionary biology tend to be correlative in nature and difficult on which to make mechanistic conclusions.  Therefore, we consider here the dynamics of evolvability in a well defined theoretical model of protein evolution.  Within this model of protein structure and function, we have a fixed population of proteins, which we take to be 1,000.  We have a microscopic selection criterion, which we take to be the folding and binding of a protein to a substrate.  And we have a means of inducing constant, random environmental change.They claim the model shows that evolvability is a function of environmental change; the more dynamic the environment, the more evolvable the protein.  This, they emphasize, is their important finding.  It’s kind of like physics:An analogy with thermodynamics illuminates the issue: How is free energy minimized in a physical system of particles despite the difficulty in defining the entropy of a given configuration of the particles?  An ensemble of particle configurations allows the definition of free energy and the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium just as a population of evolving organisms allows the definition of and selection for evolvability.They seem to be viewing individual organisms as molecules, and treating Darwinian selection as a force acting on the ensemble– a form of group selection (see 05/31/2004 headline for opposing view).  Is there any evidence in nature for their position?  They point to a few possibilities:Many observations within evolutionary biology, heretofore considered evolutionary happenstance or accidents, are explained by selection for evolvability.  For example, the vertebrate immune system shows that the variable environment of antigens has provided selective pressure for the use of adaptable codons and low-fidelity polymerases during somatic hypermutation.  A similar driving force for biased codon usage as a result of productively high mutation rates is observed in the hemagglutinin protein of influenza A.  Selection for evolvability explains the prevalence of transposons among bacteria and recombination among higher organisms.Is this concept useful?  The authors feel that “therapeutics also confer selective pressure on the evolvability of pathogens, and that this driving force for antigenic drift should be considered in drug- and vaccine-design efforts.”    The believe their model shows that “The rates at which the various events within the hierarchy of evolutionary moves occur are not random or arbitrary but are selected by Darwinian evolution.  Sensibly, rapid or extreme environmental change leads to selection for greater evolvability. This selection is not forbidden by causality and is strongest on the largest-scale moves within the mutational hierarchy.”    One of their concluding statements summarizes their view into a pithy sound bite: “Not only has life evolved, but life has evolved to evolve.”1David J. Earl and Michael W. Deem, “Evolvability is a selectable trait,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0404656101.It must get boring at the Darwin Party storytelling banquets (see 12/22/2003 commentary), so every once in awhile someone has to come up with a new plot to argue about.  To these guys, proteins in a test tube are a microcosm of caribou in the tundra or humans in Manhattan.  This paper might suggest a short story or novel on whether New Yorkers are evolving evolvability in response to terrorist attacks.  If so, terrorism might be a good thing; it makes the species more adaptable to sudden change.    It doesn’t matter whether the model corresponds to reality or not, or can be observed or not, as long as it makes entertaining reading, generates lively discussions and opens new markets for GameBoy.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img(Visited 442 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Robot designers know that making things big is easy, but making them small is hard. How do you pack a multitude of capabilities in a tiny space? Consider these little guys.Tarantulas have eight eyes that are simple (like human eyes) instead of compound. Researchers found that they use their lateral eyes to calculate distance.Lycosa tarantula, a wolf spider found in Spain, hunts by ambushing its prey and dragging its meal back to its 20cm-deep burrow. Finding the way back, however, can be a math problem after darting this way and that in the chase. Science Daily says it “uses path integration to return to its burrow.” Did this little creature ace trigonometry class? “With this mechanism, it does not follow the same path back to its burrow; instead, it moves as though it had followed the sides of a right-angle triangle, returning along the hypotenuse.” Scientists in Madrid ran experiments in the lab. It must have been fun trying to paint the lateral eyes shut on these speedy runners. The researchers put the spiders through their paces on specially-designed arrays of black and white bands. What they found reveals an astonishing array of instruments packed into a tiny space:“To calculate the distance it has travelled, the animal needs an odometer that registers the route, its location with respect to the finish point, which would be the burrow, and a ‘compass‘ to track the direction of travel,” according to Joaquin Ortega Escobar, lead author of a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology on the function of each eye in these processes.The ‘compass’ would correspond to polarised light, which the median eyes use to measure the angle; direction is detected by the anterior lateral eyes. Through this research, the scientists have learned that it is principally the anterior lateral eyes (which until now had not been analysed), and to a lesser extent the posterior lateral eyes, that help tarantula wolf spiders measures the distance to their nest.Mosquitoes have some of the fastest wings in nature. Much as we despise them, we have to have a grudging admiration for a tiny creature that can flap wings 800 beats a second—four times faster than insects of a similar size. In Nature, Laura A. Miller describes efforts to understand the flight mechanics of mosquitoes (many species of which do not bite humans). Despite the fast wingbeats, which make that annoying whine, the thin wings only employ strokes of about 40° in amplitude—much shorter than in other flying insects. Science Daily says that the researchers at Oxford University, curious about the narrow wings and short beats, “predicted that they must make use of clever tricks as the wings reverse their direction at the end of each half-stroke.”How can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes?In particular, the researchers wondered how they get enough lift. Even a mosquito needs lift to fly. The answer, they found with cameras running at 10,000 frames a second, was by a rotation mechanism in the wing attachment muscle that induces vortices on both forward and backward strokes, gaining lift in both directions. This sounds similar to what Illustra Media demonstrated in far larger animals, hummingbirds (see Flight: The Genius of Birds). Miller compares it to the force one feels holding a hand out the window of a moving car, rotating it into and out of the wind. The researchers (who must have had amazing technology to measure lift on such minuscule wings) found that mosquitoes actually employ three mechanisms to get all the lift they can: (1) leading-edge vortex, (2) wake capture, and (3) rotational drag—a trick unique to mosquitoes.Could drone designers learn from these tricks of the mosquito? “Mosquito-flight investigations are certainly on their way to generating plenty of future research buzz,” Miller quips.Honeybees have better eyesight than thought, Science Daily reports. They can clearly discern objects at angles of a mere 1.9°, as small as your thumb at arm’s length, but that’s not all; they can make out objects at just 0.6° almost as well, a third as wide. This is 30% better than earlier thought, according to an Australian team that gave eye tests to bees. “Among other things, honey bees help to answer questions such as: how can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes, and what are its utmost limits? In the last few decades it has been shown that bees can see and categorize objects and learn concepts through vision, such as the concept of ‘symmetric’ and ‘above and below’….“Photoreceptors in the visual system detect variations in light intensity. There are eight photoreceptors beyond each hexagonal facet of a bee’s compound eye, and their eyes are made out of thousands of facets!“Butterflies have an amazing mouthpart called the proboscis that lets them slurp nectar like drinking through a straw. Only they don’t need to suck; the proboscis is designed to bring fluid in automatically, by capillary action. These mouthparts are clearly shown in Illustra Media’s documentary Metamorphosis, which shows how after hatching from the chrysalis, the proboscis emerges in half-channels. The butterfly uses other mouthparts called palpi to knit the two halves together into a single channel. The proboscis can be rolled up into a neat little circle like a hose reel, and extended for use.Recently, Phys.org tried to unravel other mysteries of the mouthparts of butterflies. And like the “bee team” reported above, researchers at Kent State (UK) wanted to learn about this to imitate it. “An insect’s proboscis, a body part that allows them to drink liquids, acts like a highly-sophisticated sponge and straw that uses capillary action to send nectar or other liquids to the insect’s digestive system,” the team says. The channel size is crucially important for the type of liquid the insect needs to drink.The team’s findings show that capillary action is an essential and ideal method for removing small amounts of fluids from surfaces, Lehnert said. By copying this natural method, scientists say the mouthparts of flies and butterflies can serve as models for developing new devices for improved drug delivery systems.Even though engineers can only approach the efficiency of the butterfly proboscis, Lehnert attributed the insect’s design to evolution. “In order to feed on nectar and other liquid films, natural selection has favored the evolution of specialized mouthparts in fluid-feeding insects,” the press release writer says. Then Lehnert mixes convergent evolution with personification to portray natural selection as a refining agent:“It was previously known that flies and butterflies independently evolved mouthparts adapted for feeding on fluids, but what was unknown before our study was that they both use the same principles for ingesting fluids – capillary action,” Lehnert said. “Our findings have applications to the production of novel microfluidic devices that can be developed to mimic the functionality of insect mouthparts, which have the advantage of being impacted by natural selection over millions of years.“Ants rescue their dead. Did you know that? Neither did scientists; Phys.org reports that researchers in Europe, studying African ants, didn’t expect to see this. “We have observed helping behaviour vis-à-vis injured animals for the first time in invertebrates,” one said. For social insects where nest members are clones with no individuality, this is quite amazing; “obviously, it pays off for the colony as a whole to invest in the rescue service,” they say. The ants’ triage service will sound remarkably familiar to those in the human military:When an ant is injured in a fight, it will “call” its mates for help by excreting chemical substances. The injured insect is then carried back to the nest where it can recover after receiving treatment. What is the “therapy” like? Usually, treatment involves removing the termites still clinging to the ant.Dung Beetles seem disgusting, rolling balls of poop around to feed on, but they actually play a part in the balance of nature. And they have an amazing trick that has come to the light of science: they navigate by the Milky Way. Really! At The Conversation, James Foster of Lund University describes experiments to figure out how they do it. His team created an artificial Milky Way sky to watch them under controlled conditions. They found that it isn’t constellations that guide them, but the brightness patterns between the Milky Way and the other parts of the sky that help them orient themselves, so that they can roll their ball in a straight line.This brightness-comparison strategy may be less sophisticated than the way birds and human sailors identify specific constellations, but it’s an efficient solution to interpreting the complex information present in the starry sky—given how small the beetles’ eyes and brains are. In this way, they overcome the limited bandwidth of their information processing systems and do more with less, just as humans have learnt to do with technology.So there you have it: insects and arachnids with remarkable superpowers, using well-designed equipment. The genius in these animals is so good, scientists study it in order to copy it. Knowing what we have learned, it makes it hard to swat, step on, or spray these sophisticated little living robots.Don’t feel too sorry for that mosquito after your blood. This is not the “very good” world of the original creation before the Fall. Still, God has left enough evidence of his creative power to stand in awe of his wisdom. It should draw us to seek him, humble ourselves, repent, and trust in his way of escape from the consequences of sin.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Light snow moves into Ohio today with a minor disturbance moving quickly over the region. Action today look to stay rather localized. Scattered snow showers push into west-central Ohio near midday, and then continue to spread east as they slide south through the afternoon and evening. Everything should be done by Midnight tonight. Generally, we are expecting snow to be mostly limited to central and southern Ohio, about 75 miles either side of I-70. In terms of amounts, we are looking for a coating to an inch from in most areas. We won’t rule out a few flurries north of US 30 and a dusting in spots, but generally this is a central and southern Ohio event.  The map at right shows potential for today. We kick off a dry forecast pattern on Friday. We should stay precipitation free over almost all of the state from Friday through next Wednesday night.  We do have a significant storm complex exiting the central plains Saturday and moving across the Deep south. AT this point we are keeping all precipitation from that system south of the Ohio river into KY. We wont rule out a few clouds in far southern Ohio this Sunday and perhaps early Monday, but that is it. The rest of us see a nice mix of sun and clouds. This will be the longest dry stretch we will have seen in quite some time. Light snow moves back into the region next Thursday, bringing a coating to 2 inches to 70% of the state. A second wave of action hits on Friday as a strong low starts to pass to the south, but then hooks north into western PA. That means we see a significant increase in snow threat next Friday over eastern OH. We can see an additional coating to 2 inches in western OH, but in eastern areas, snow Friday through early Saturday can be significantly higher, with the highest coming near the lake. In addition, winds do look to be a problem. We can expect 20-40 mph winds statewide on Friday coming out of the north on the backside that a powerful low. If winds stay at our projected intensity, we would see blizzard conditions over eastern Ohio, and potentially even some nastiness in western Ohio. This event looks nasty right now…but has plenty of time to modify and put in a different track…so stay tuned. For the extended period, we continue to see an active 6 day stretch. Rains arrive on the 17th and linger into early the 18th, bringing .1”-.5” totals, mostly over the southern half of the state. Then as have another frontal complex arriving for the 20th. This one has rain potential of .25”-.75” with 80% coverage of the state south of US 30. Notice we continue to talk rain! While the nearby 10 window looks cold, particularly with a reinforcing shot of cold air this weekend, the 11-16 day period warms considerably, and we expect well above normal temps all the way through the 22nd. This will allow all precipitation in that extended forecast to stay liquid. This cold, dry stretch looks to us to be the best opportunity to finish up the late harvest and may be the best chance of the rest of 2018.last_img read more

first_img_This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called “Building Science Fundamentals” taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube of Building Science Corporation._ For information on attending a live class, go to BuildingScienceSeminars.com In our last episode, Dr. Joe Lstiburek compared air barriers and vapor barriers, and explained how airtightness helps keep homes free of mold and rot. This week Dr. Joe explains how water and salt move through masonry by osmosis, often causing serious damage to foundations. He also offers some solutions to this common problem. __________________________________________________ Osmosis isn’t a problem everywhere In new construction, it’s real easy: you coat the top of the footing, you’ve got your stone (capillary) break, you’ve got your dampproofing. You don’t have to worry about salt, and you don’t have to worry about capillarity — life is good. It’s kind of hard to retrofit this. It’s a wonderful way to do it in new construction, but it’s tough if you’ve got a 100-, 200-, or 300-year-old structure to deal with. What’s so bad about salt and water? The physics of the osmosis forces works like this: water takes the salt in solution to a surface, the water evaporates, and the salt is left behind. And as more water evaporates, more salt accumulates, so the concentration of salt goes up. As the concentration of salt goes up, water rushes to the concentration of salt in order to dilute it — because one of the rules of physics is that nature doesn’t like these kinds of concentrations. The action of the water rushing to the surface actually creates hydrostatic forces. This pressure from the water rushing through the pore system causes the material to flake apart, and the explosive flaking is referred to as spalling. Let me summarize this: salt is very bad; water is very bad; salt and water together — whoa! Osmosis is powerful stuff The pressures are extraordinary. With diffusion, pressures are 3 to 5 psi — it’s nothing. Water vapor never pushed nothing off of nothing. Capillary pressures are fairly impressive — 300 to 500 psi. It moves water to the top of a 400-foot tree. That’s a pretty impressive force. But it isn’t anywhere close to the league of osmosis pressures, which are 3000 to 5000 psi. The compressive strength of even good concrete is 2000 to 3000 psi — salt and water will beat concrete every time. Osmosis beats capillarity which beats diffusion. Wow. Bridges fall down, life comes to an end, when you have salt and water. Sacrificial mortars are one solution Well, old-timers figured stuff out. What these folks noticed was that the mortar was eaten away much faster than the masonry, and certain mortars were eaten away much faster than others. The pore structure of the mortar was very critical to this. And someone said, “Aha! Maybe if I get the pore structure just right, all of the salt will end up in the mortar instead of the brick. And the mortar can sacrifice itself to protect the integrity of the brick.” That’s when we figured out that softer, weaker mortars are actually the ideal complement to clay brick that’s been fired at a specific temperature. And the solution would be to re-point the mortar as it was eaten away. You never want to have a mortar that’s stronger than the brick, because then the brick sacrifices itself to protect the mortar. That’s why historic preservationists — the old ones that know stuff because they’ve been around a long time — go to an enormous amount of trouble in old buildings to match the mortar chemistry precisely. The general rule is: if you don’t know what’s going on, don’t mess with the building. Or if something’s been around for two or three hundred years, don’t mess with the strategy. If you come up with the right mix, all of the deterioration happens in the joints, and you simply re-point them on a 15 or 20 year basis. Parging protects the entire surface Well, why not just coat the whole thing with a sacrificial layer? And instead of doing this on a 10-year basis, why not extend this to a 30- or 40-year basis? The way you think of this sacrificial layer is as a sort of lime-based poultice that sucks the salt poison out of the assembly. So how do you know when you have to replace it? Well, when it falls off. It’s the building telling you it’s time to put on another sacrificial layer.Related topicsRead about a real-world example of water damage in a brick foundation. And find strategies for keeping bulk water away from a basement.last_img read more

first_imgWe’ve made some changes to our website, most noticeably – our new web address!You can now find us at MilitaryFamiliesLearningNetwork.org where you can view or share the latest blog posts, podcasts, resources and team pages. Be sure to share the new address with your colleagues!Our returning webinar participants will notice that you can now RSVP for all our upcoming webinars and events at this new web address.Later this year, webinar recordings from learn.extension.org will be moved to this web address so you can search for all webinars and events all in one place.Interested in hearing about some of these new updates and changes? Sign up for upcoming webinar event notifications or RSVP today to register for an upcoming webinar!last_img read more

first_img8. GoPro Hero 4 BlackWhile they certainly do have their limitations, GoPro cameras have recently recieved some serious upgrades, making them a fantastic tool to use for stylized film purposes. From drone footage to helmet-cams, GoPros are versatile cameras for a variety of shooting situations. Take a look at some of the test footage below. The quality will surprise you.Price: $499.99 on B&HPros:4K Recording1080p at 120fpsMonitoring via Wi-Fi and BluetoothSmall SizeCons:Fixed LensH.264 OnlyLimited InterfaceGoPro Hero 4 Black Test Footage 3. Canon 70DIf you’re looking for a step up from the T5i, the Canon 70D is a great choice. Unlike the T5i, the 70D can record in MOV and H.264. The camera can also record up to 60fps in 720p with a continuous autofocus that works well for events and casual shooting. The 70D is also a little more durable and weather resistant than the T5i.Price: $999.00 on B&HPros:Continuous AutofocusWi-Fi ConnectivityFlip-Out ScreenCons:Highest-Priced CameraNo RAW SupportCanon 70D Test Footage Want to get the biggest camera bang for your buck? Check out these 8 incredible cameras that won’t break the bank.There are a lot of low-cost hobbies out there – and filmmaking ain’t one of them. Between camera gear, audio equipment, crew members, editing stations, and distribution there is a constant battle to stretch your dollar in any way possible. Unfortunately, a common misconception is that buying a fancy filmmaking camera will make your footage look great. This is simply not true.Artistic concepts like composition, leadingvlines, and color theory play a much bigger role in the look and feel of your film than simply camera choice. This is great news for filmmakers because it means we can allocate more of our budget to other areas of the production. So if you’re looking to capture amazing footage without spending a ton of money, check out the following eight cameras.1. Blackmagic Pocket CameraWhen the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera was released just a few years ago, it was a game changer for the indie filmmaking community. To this day, the Pocket Camera has an image quality that’s unmatched at its price point. Most notably, the BMPCC has 13 stops of dynamic range with the ability to record RAW in-camera.The camera’s small design also allows it to be easily stored. However, the biggest issue with shooting on a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is the crop factor. Without a focal reducer, the BMPCC has a crop factor of 2.88. This means a 24mm lens will actually act like a 69mm lens on a full-frame camera. So, getting wide angle shots on a BMPCC is a bit of a challenge.Price: $995 on B&H Pros:RAW Recording + ProRes 422 HQ13 Stops of Dynamic RangeHDMI OutputUses SD CardsCons:Crop FactorBattery LifeBlackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera Test Footage 7. Sony a77 IILike Panasonic, Sony has upped their game over the last few years to become a leader in the indie-filmmaking community. If you’re looking for a good entry-level Sony camera, then the a77 II is perfect. With 1080p recording at 60fps and a swivel LCD screen, the a77 II is both easy-to-use and high-quailty.Price: $998 on B&HPros:60fps at 1080pSwivel LCD ScreenCons:Sony Lens Mount OnlyAVC/H.264 OnlyRecording Limit of 29 MinutesSony A77II Test Footage Are you a filmmaker on a tight-budget? Check out a few of the following posts:10 Essential Filmmaking Tools Under $10012 Essential Filmmaking Tools Under $20Nine 4K Cameras Under $4KKnow of any other great cameras under $1000? Have any experience with any of the gear listed above? Share in the comments below. 5. Nikon D5300At a fraction of the cost of the D7100, the Nikon D5300 is a great alternative for those looking for great video at a lower price. The D5300 is the only camera on this list without a low-pass filter, meaning you won’t get moire when shooting patterns. The camera can also connect to the internet via Wi-Fi and tag its current location via a built-in GPS.Price: $696.65 on B&HPros:No Low-Pass FilterWi-Fi & GPS60fps in 1080pCons:Nikon Lenses OnlyRecording Length Limited to 20 Minutes at 60fpsNikon D5300 Test Footage 6. Panasonic GH3Over the last few years, Panasonic has made a splash in the indie filmmaking world and it all started with the GH3. The GH3 blends cinematic video with great stills and since the release of the GH4 last year, the price has been cut greatly. The camera can record 1080p video at up to 60fps and it also includes timecode information to help in the editing process. The GH3 uses a MFT mount, so you won’t be hard-pressed to find a decent lens.Price: $797.99 on B&HPros:MFT Lens Mount1080p at 60fpsWi-Fi ConnectivityTimecodeContinuous AFCons:Larger BodyPanasonic GH3 Test Footage 2. Canon T5iServing as the 5th installment in the ‘T’ line of cameras, the T5i is an amazing camera for anyone looking to get great video and pictures from the same camera. The camera has a flip-out screen that can help if you have the camera mounted to a rig. The T5i takes Canon EF lenses, so there are a lot of options. If/when you decide to upgrade to a nicer camera, you can use those same EF lenses on most professional Canon cameras.Price: $699.00 on B&HPros:Flip Out LCD ScreenHigh ISO capabilitiesLarge Lens SelectionCons:H.264 Recording Only (without hack)Canon T5i Test Footage 4. Nikon D7100If you are equally serious about photography and video, then the D7100 might be for you. In addition to shooting 1080p video at 60fps, the camera can record 24MP stills. Video footage from the D7100 is solid. However, you can’t record RAW or ProRes, making the camera somewhat limited if you want to have greater control over your colors.Price: $996.95 on B&HPros:1080p at 60fps24MP StillsCons:Nikon Lenses OnlyNikon D7100 Test Footagelast_img read more

first_imgWest Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday said she would have shared Teesta water with Bangladesh had there been enough water available. “Bangladesh has stopped giving us Hilsa. This is because we could not give them Teesta water. We would have given if we had surplus water,” Ms. Banerjee said on the floor of the State Legislative Assembly.The sharing of Teesta water is a major bilateral issue between India and Bangladesh. Ms. Banerjee has said that entire north Bengal will run dry if the water was shared with Bangladesh. Instead, she has proposed sharing the waters of other north Bengal rivers such as Torsa, Manshai, Sankosh and Dhansai.last_img read more