first_imgLooking for off-campus housing? The search just got easier with South Bend Student Housing, a new website created by six Notre Dame students in the Engineering, Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Masters Program (ESTEEM). The website makes finding residences, contacting land lords and securing listings faster and more convenient.Graduate students Keith Marrero, Amanda Miller, Conor Hanley, Eric Tilley, Nathan Higgins and Sean Liebscher are the co-founders of the website and business South Bend Student Housing, which went live in February. “It’s kind of like Amazon,” Marrero said. “You tell it what you want and it’ll tell you what’s available that meets your needs, and then you’re able to make an informed decision based on that.”Marrero said the website allows students to browse housing options in the South Bend area based on amenities and preferences. “One of our goals is to provide information for students about everything that’s available because a lot of students will hear about their housing through word of mouth,” he said. “You don’t really know everything that’s out there.”Although the co-founders are still in the process of contacting landlords and adding additional listings to the site, Marrero said the site already contains numerous housing options available for browsing. Students interested in a property can simply click the “Contact Landlord” button to email the owner directly. The website includes additional features such as a compare option. “One of our big features is the compare feature,” he said. “It enables you to compare three, four, however many properties you want on one page as opposed to having a million tabs open.”Marrero said there are means of comparison between properties to see if they include various features such as off-street parking or in-unit laundry. The distance from the residence to the University is also included. The website is especially helpful for graduate students who travel from various areas around the country and world and are likely unfamiliar with the South Bend area and housing options, Marrero said. The website first started out as a class assignment, but Marrero said the interviews the team conducted for class showed such positive feedback that students began asking when the website would go live. After deciding to make the project a reality, Marrero said the team received funding from an anonymous investor for the entrepreneurial venture. A beta site was created last fall and advertising through social media started in February. Students interested in learning more about off-campus options can visit the website southbendstudenthousing.com for more information. Tags: ESTEEM, South Bend Student Housinglast_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories How Ange Bradley finally got the national title she’s been chasing for 25 yearsSyracuse field hockey becomes 1st women’s team in school history to win national championshipAlyssa Manley wins Honda Award as nation’s top field hockey playerAlma Fenne leads scoring for No. 1 Syracuse in first and final season with teamRoos Weers deals with dyslexia, transition to U.S. in becoming star at Syracuse Published on January 8, 2016 at 2:03 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TRcenter_img Syracuse head coach Ange Bradley was named National Coach of the Year by the National Field Hockey Coaches Association, it announced Friday.The award comes after Bradley led the Orange to the program’s first national championship this season, the first national title for a women’s team in school history. SU started the season 16-0 but lost to North Carolina in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament final. The Orange then defeated the Tar Heels 4-2 in the national championship.This is the second time Bradley’s been named coach of the year. She won her first in 2008, her second year at Syracuse, when the Orange went 22-2 and appeared in its first-ever national semifinal. She’s also a seven-time conference coach of the year, owns the sixth-best winning percentage in Division-I history (.751) and ranks fourth among active coaches.Since Bradley’s hiring in 2007, the Orange has appeared in four final fours, back-to-back national championship games and, this season, won its first regular season ACC title since joining the league in 2013.While Bradley was named ACC coach of the year, SU became the first team since 1994 to sweep the ACC awards. Alma Fenne won Offensive Player of the Year; Alyssa Manley, Defensive Player of the Year; Roos Weers, Rookie of the Year.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange ranked second nationally in scoring margin (2.75), fourth in goals-against average (0.98), fifth in goals per game (3.82) and fifth in scoring average (3.73). Commentslast_img read more

first_imgIntroductionThe increased attraction of foreign direct investments to post-conflict Liberia and the Government’s efforts to reduce poverty and make Liberia a middle-income country by 2030 will have little impact if public sector management remains wanting. Effective public sector performance will greatly determine the extent to which Liberia steadily remains on the road to reconstruction and development. Corruption and inefficiency continue to be stubborn obstacles to good public sector management. In their efforts to reduce corruption and promote the proper use of public sector resources, multiple government entities—including the Ministry of Justice, the Liberia Anti-Corruption Commission (LACC), the Civil Service Agency (CSA), the General Auditing Commission (GAC), the Governance Commission (GC) and the Public Procurement and Concessions Commission (PPCC)—are severely challenged by entrenched bad practices in the public sector. Many of these institutions are putting up their best fight against public sector corruption and inefficiency, but the battle is overwhelming, to say the least.       Any hope for good public sector management?Some hope seems to lie in the Internal Audit Agency (IAA), an outgrowth of the Internal Audit Secretariat (IAS), which was created by the Liberian Government to help improve public sector performance. The IAA has the legal mandate to “Establish and direct internal audit functions within all branches of Government including the Executive, Legislative and Judiciary; and all public entities such as, public corporations, autonomous agencies, autonomous commissions, Government ministries and the Central Bank of Liberia.” The mandate also charges the IAA to “Advise and/or provide assurance that financial and operational activities of Government are in compliance with laws, policies, plans, standards and procedures that are applicable.”In line with this legal responsibility, the IAA has been assuming and reorganizing the internal audit functions of government agencies, and working with them to improve their financial and operational processes. Through risk assessment, assurance, advisory and other audit functions, the IAA works with government agencies to improve performance in priority areas such as payroll and personnel management, bank reconciliations, pre-auditing of disbursements, assets management, accounting and budgetary controls, prior audit recommendations and procurement. These efforts are contributing to better outcomes in the public sector and saving the Government of Liberia huge sums of money and other resources.In 2011, the IAS—the precursor of the IAA–started the deployment of internal auditors in eight government ministries. Today, IAA is working with 35 government ministries and public corporations. IAA auditors are recruited through rigorous testing and interview processes conducted with the help of diverse panelists. The auditors are predominantly college-educated. Many hold advanced degrees, while some have professional certifications such as Certified Fraud Examiners (CFE) and the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA).The Challenges of Change The deployment of internal auditors at Government agencies has received mixed responses. Most agency heads have embraced the assistance of the IAA. They generally consult with the internal auditors as often as needed on financial and operational issues. Some agency heads would hardly authorize certain transactions unless the transactions have been cleared by the internal auditors. Understandably, a few other agencies have been struggling with the new phenomenon of independent internal auditors. The IAA understands and expects these struggles—seeing them as a normal part of the change process. Change can be uncertain, complex and difficult, thereby engendering fears and suspicion. Therefore, the IAA has modified its baseline and continued education training curricula to help its auditors to effectively handle difficult institutional change reactions. Embedded in the new curricula are critical soft skills and other content areas such as conceptual and interpersonal competence, communications diplomacy, organizational culture, group dynamics, complexity of change, resistance to change, fear, stress reduction, conflict resolution and transformational leadership.       GAC and IAA: The DifferenceIt’s often asked why the IAA is needed when the GAC already exists? The GAC is an external auditor. At specified times, it goes in and audits government entities. Important as this exercise might be, sometimes damage (e.g., falsified information, resource abuse, theft or regulatory breach) has already been done.In contrast, the IAA is an internal auditor. It operates as an independent but integral part of the institutions in which its auditors are deployed. It goes into a government agency and assumes the internal audit function. The IAA reviews, studies and follows the financial and operational activities of an agency. It then advises and helps the agency to meet the required regulations, policies and procedures. For example, a GAC review may come at the end of a project, while an IAA review may happen in real time, thereby increasing the opportunity for new decisions and actions to be taken for a project to succeed.ConclusionThe socio-economic development of Liberia depends greatly on the efficiency and effectiveness of the public sector. Due to the current state of Liberia’s public sector, a lot of help is needed to contribute to the transformation of Liberia, as well as raise the nation’s living standard to a middle-income level. The adoption of the IAA concept, which is gaining traction in Africa and other developing regions, could not happen at a better time in post-conflict Liberia. The IAA represents the latest tool in the Government’s toolbox to make the public sector more effective, efficient, transparent and accountable. About the AuthorZobong consults with the IAA. He also teaches in the Graduate Program in Education at the University of Liberia. Zobong holds a doctorate in Educational Leadership from Northeastern University in the United States.     Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more