first_imgLetterkenny University Hospital has opened 10 beds in the Short Stay Ward today, but the campaign for full capacity continues, according to Sinn Féin Senator Pádraig Mac Lochlainn.The Donegal Senator has given a cautious welcome to confirmation that half of the beds in Letterkenny’s 20 bed Short Stay Ward are reopening this Thursday.However, Mac Lochlainn has criticised the government for not fully delivering on their assurances last year. The Senator today challenged the Government to explain why they announced the reopening of all 20 Short Stay beds last October, only for the HSE to allocate funding for five beds and support staff.Senator Mac Lochlainn said: “Last year, Sinn Fein members across Donegal organised a petition that was signed by thousands of local people, calling for the reopening of Letterkenny Hospital’s 20-bed Short Stay Ward. Throughout 2017 and last year, there was an average of around 20 people every day on trolleys at the hospital and it was obvious to see, the huge difference the reopening of these beds and this ward would have on the trolley crisis.“The trolley crisis also pushed nurses, doctors and support staff at the hospital into relentlessly impossible working conditions.“Last October, local Government Minister, Joe McHugh announced the reopening of these beds and Fianna Fáil claimed that they had secured this under “confidence and supply”. While this was welcomed by the people of Donegal as overdue good news, it quickly became clear that these promises and political claims were not backed up with the money.” Senator Mac Lochlainn said he was shocked by party announcement on the reopening yesterday, adding:“After much further investigation, we learned earlier this year that the Government and the HSE had only released enough money to reopen 5 beds, much to the frustration of the Saolta Hospital Group and the management of Letterkenny Hospital. So the Saolta Hospital Group allocated enough extra resources to reopen 10 beds and they are to be commended for this.“But for the Government or Fianna Fáil to now welcome this is astounding. Their political claims last year after the budget have not materialised and for Sinn Féin and the people of Donegal, the campaign to reopen all of these beds continues.”Short Stay Ward campaign isn’t over at Letterkenny Hospital was last modified: June 6th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The hot days and muggy nights of late have certainly all but erased now distant memories of the late frost that punctuated the cool, wet spring planting season. Even though harvest season is drawing near, it may not hurt to review the crops that were hurt by the late frost in the not-so-distant past to see if any lessons can be learned for the future.May 16, 2016 is not a date Levi Runkle will soon forget. He is an agronomist for Tri Ag Products in London and he spent the day looking at frost damage in customer’s fields. He is still haunted by what he saw in his corn field that night when he got home.“That particular field was one of the best fields I have ever had in terms of emergence, stand count and population. Even the morning of the 16th it looked great when it had a little frost on it,” Runkle said. “But that night about 8:00 I came back and it was a punch in the gut. It looked pretty bad. I work with customers all the time and tell them that it will be alright, but when it is your own field it is a little different feeling. You could row it great the morning of the 16th and it looked awesome. By the 17th you couldn’t row it. You couldn’t even tell anything had been planted in some places.”After more assessment in the following days, the field looked like a total loss on the surface and multiple people (including the insurance adjuster) said it was a clear replant situation. But according to Ohio State University Extension, the best way to assess the impact of freezing temperatures on emerged corn is to check plants about five days after the freezing injury occurred and observe the condition of the growing point by splitting seedlings lengthwise. If the growing point appears white to light yellow and firm several days after the frost, prognosis for recovery is good.Ohio State University Extension corn specialist Peter Thomison said that corn as far along as the V1 stage (one leaf collar visible) survived freezing soil temperatures with little impact on crop performance or plant stand.“Agronomists generally downplay the impact of low temperature injury in corn because the growing point is at or below the soil surface until V6, and thereby relatively safe from freezing air temperatures,” Thomison said. “Moreover, the cell contents of corn plants can sometimes act as an ‘antifreeze’ to allow temperatures to drop below 32 degrees F before tissue freezes, but injury to corn is often fatal when temperatures drop to 28 degrees F or lower for even a few minutes.”A bit of digging below the surface in Runkle’s field showed good results, but there was still significant skepticism about not replanting the field.“Three days later it was ugly and my neighbors thought it was all dead, but we still had a root system under there and we still had a lot going for us. As we started digging, the stems were still good. They were still intact with a lot of good color to them and they weren’t squishy. I was doing a lot of reading at night, reviewing the things I learned in school and talking to agronomists. The growing point was still under the ground, so I just needed a little time and faith,” he said. “By May 26, though, insurance companies were looking at it and saying that it needed to all be replanted. Replanting then would have lost us a whole month on the original planting date. The plants looked bad but the root system was still good. By May 31, the plants were looking better, but the field still needed torn up according to some people.”But Runkle held strong on the belief that the sound root system and the struggling field just needed more time.The field today, though, looks great after the decision to not replant.“After two or three weeks, it came back up and some of the leaves were curled and it still looked bad. After three weeks it started catching up with the rest of the crop and now it looks great. If we would have replanted then we would have lost the great root system we had. It had been planted around April 20 to 24. Even though it looked bad above ground, it still had a great root system below ground and I wouldn’t trade that for anything going into the hot, dry conditions we saw in July,” he said. “By July 14, you really had to look to find the areas that were frost damaged. It really came back. We had fairly good pollination conditions for that corn and the root system was able to capitalize on the little water we did get. I feel a whole lot better now about not replanting that. If I’d have corn planted a month later, it would have been headed into the hot, dry 90-degree temperatures for pollination. That earlier corn was already pollinated before the heat.”Ultimately, the stand counts had been reduced by the frost, but not at levels great enough to justify replanting.“We might have lost 10% or 15% in the worst parts of the field. We would have needed to see around a 50% loss to warrant replanting that late in the season. From what it looks like today after not replanting I think we are in pretty good shape,” Runkle said. “We would have had to have a really low population to warrant a replant a month later. Where we are now is above 30,000 population and we have a lot more potential with that than a stand that was planted a month later.”While leaving Runkle’s initial corn stand was clearly the way to go, soybeans in the frosted areas did not fare so well. If frost damage occurs above the soybean cotyledons, the plant will likely recover. It will not recover if damaged below the cotyledon.“Beans were a little more of a problem with that frost, especially in a no-till situation with a lot of residue. For the most part, beans that were frosted in that situation needed to be replanted,” Runkle said of his customers’ fields. “There were still some surprises though, where the frost didn’t quite get all of the growing point, or maybe it wasn’t all of the way out of the ground and it looked bad on the cotyledons but once that opened up there was still a good growing point there. Some of those beans surprised us and the beans came back and didn’t need replanting.”Some wheat fields also took a hit.“We had some record wheat yields, with great quality this year and good straw. But, in the areas where it was flowering when it got frosted, especially in the lower areas of the field, we had about half the yield we had everywhere else. We had a lot of issues and it was hard to tell the effect of the frost when it happened because we did not have much experience with a frost on wheat when it was flowering. We learned a lot about that this year,” Runkle said. “With wheat, we had to search far and wide to find anyone with experience with flowering wheat getting frosted. There was purpling on May 18 after being frosted. It looked a little bit like head scab, but it was frost damage. It really did hurt the wheat in some areas where the wheat was flowering when it frosted.”What is now almost forgotten by some has proven to be a great learning experience for Runkle for his fields and the fields of his customers in the future.“We are going to keep track of things in that field and pull some ears on that corn,” he said. “But as of right now, I think we’re doing pretty well.”last_img read more

first_imgAfter blockbuster Dabangg Sonakshi Sinha is all set to make a comback in Rowdy Rathore along with Akshay Kumar.Bollywood’s original Khiladi Akshay Kumar returns to what he is best at- action. He will be seen packing some hardcore kicks and punches in Prabhu Deva directed Rowdy Rathore when it releases Friday.Made with a budget of approximately Rs.40 crore, the film is a remake of Telugu film Vikramarkudu. It is co-produced by Sanjay Leela Bhansali and Ronnie Screwvala. The film will be released in 2,300 screens in India and around 400 screens overseas.The film revolves around Shiva (Akshay), who is a small-time conman. He is head-over-heels in love with Priya (Sonakshi Sinha), a pretty girl whom he met at a wedding he wasn’t invited to. The picture perfect world of Shiva turns upside down with the entry of six-year-old girl Neha, who believes he is her father.Shiva also becomes the victim of a series of life threatening attacks by a gang of deadly criminals, who seem to know something he doesn’t. In the quest to save his life and love, Shiva stumbles upon a deadly secret, something which takes him to a small town in Bihar.That town is ruled by a ruthless MLA and the mafia he controls. The inhabitants of the small town find a saviour in Shiva.Akshay is said to have learned combat karate for his role in the film. He is seen sporting a rugged look in the film. The movie bosses had launched an online hunt for Akshay’s look for Rowdy Rathore.The cast and crew of the film had a tough time shooting in Karnataka’s temple town of Hampi. The shoot was disrupted after activists alleged that the makers didn’t use the minimum number of local dancers that they had promised.Sonakshi’s red sari act in the song Chhammak challo chail chabeeli has compelled people to draw comparisons with Kareena Kapoor’s Chhammak chhallo in RA.One. However, the actress brushes it off as mere co-incidence and insists the two songs should not be compared.Filmmakers have been coming up with innovative ways of promoting a film or launching the music and Rowdy Rathore too tried a new trick. The film’s music was launched in a chawl in Mumbai.This will be Sonakshi’s second release after blockbuster Dabangg.After this, Akshay and Sonakshi will appear together in Joker and strike a hattrick with Once Upon A Time Again.Two of the film’s songs have a slew of Southern and Hindi film actors making a special appearance. While Chinta ta chita has Tamil star Vijay, Kareena Kapoor, Rajesh Hamal and Prabhu Deva himself, Aa re pritam pyaare has Maryam Zakaria, Shakti Mohan, Mumaith Khan and Amit Kumar.advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgGarbine Muguruza will get another shot at the Wimbledon title.The 14th-seeded Spaniard advanced to the final at the All England Club by beating Magdalena Rybarikova 6-1, 6-1 Thursday on Centre Court.Muguruza reached the Wimbledon final in 2015, but lost to Serena Williams. She will get a second chance at the title on Saturday against either five-time champion Venus Williams or Johanna Konta.Muguruza won the first five games of the first set, facing only one break point and saving it. The 2016 French Open champion then broke Rybarikova twice to open the second set and take a 4-0 lead.”I think today I step up on court, super confident,” Muguruza said, “and everything went well.”Muguruza is now 3-0 in Grand Slam semifinal matches.Rybarikova was playing in a major semifinal for the first time. At No. 87, she was the fourth lowest-ranked player in history to reach the Wimbledon semifinals.But the unseeded Slovak entered Thursday’s match with an 18-1 record on grass this season, including a run to the semifinals in Nottingham. She also won two lower-level events.The 23-year-old Muguruza, who is playing at Wimbledon for the fifth time, has dropped the least amount of games at this year’s tournament, losing only 39 so far.In the second match on Centre Court, Williams was looking to reach her ninth final at the All England Club — and first since 2009. The 10th-seeded American, who is 37 years old, is 8-1 in Wimbledon semifinal matches over 20 appearances at the grass-court major.Konta was playing in the Wimbledon semifinals for the first time.advertisement”I definitely want to win,” Muguruza said, “no matter who is front of me.”last_img read more

first_imgJessica and Jerry Seinfeld hosted the Baby Buggy Summer Dinner, in partnership with Vanity Fair and supported by Giorgio Armani, at their home in the Hamptons on July 26.Scott Disick, Kourtney Kardashian and Jessica Seinfeld Attend Baby Buggy Summer DinnerCredit/Copyright: BFAAmong the guests were Alec Baldwin, Rachel Zoe, Roger Berman, Kourtney Kardashian, Scott Disick, Nacho Figueras, Delfina Blaquier, Ali Wentworth, George Stephanopoulos, Alina Cho, and Atlanta de Cadenet Taylor.Hilaria and Alec BaldwinCredit/Copyright: BFABaby Buggy, founded by Jessica Seinfeld in 2001, is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing families in need with essential equipment, products, clothing, and services for their infants and children up to age 12. With an extensive network of community-based organizations across the country, Baby Buggy has donated more than 7.3 million items to thousands of children.Rachel Zoe and Roger BermanCredit/Copyright: BFAlast_img read more