first_imgLONDON (AP):The IOC advised national Olympic committees yesterday to follow the World Health Organization’s (WHO) guidance on dealing with the Zika virus ahead of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, asserting its confidence that the games will be safe.Brazil has been hit hard by the mosquito-borne virus, which has been linked to severe birth defects in infants, raising concerns about the outbreak’s potential impact on South America’s first Olympics in August.The International Olympic Committee (IOC) sent a note to all national Olympic committees outlining the latest medical advice concerning the Zika virus, the most recent problem for a country already dealing with a severe economic crisis and a sprawling corruption scandal.”All parties are taking action to address this topic, and are following developments closely,” the IOC said.The two-page note from the IOC medical commission repeated advice for travellers to take precautions against mosquito bites and for women who are planning to become pregnant to assess the potential risks of travelling to areas infected with the virus.”The IOC remains in close contact with the WHO to ensure that we have access to the most up-to-date information and guidance, from now through to Games time,” the IOC statement said. “At the same time NOCs should consult with their national health authorities to get advice and guidance.”The IOC did not say the Olympics were threatened in any way and made it clear that it expects the Aug. 5-21 games to be secure for athletes and visitors.”We remain confident that there will be a safe environment for successful and enjoyable games in Rio de Janeiro,” the statement concluded.last_img read more

first_imgAn inquest has been scheduled into the death of an Inishowen man who was killed in a road traffic collision in 2017. John ‘Rustard’ McLaughlin died following a two-car collision outside Malin Town on February 21, 2017.John, who was a married father-of-three in Greencastle, was a hugely respected member of the local community. The decision was made by Donegal Coroner Dr Denis McCauley during proceedings in Buncrana Court on Wednesday, June 5.The DDP (Director of Public Prosecutions) in Dublin are now expected to make a decision by September 11, 2019.Inquest into death of Inishowen man to be held in September was last modified: June 12th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img30 May 2012 South Africa possesses sound knowledge gained from over 25 years’ experience that makes it more than competent to run a large nuclear power plant, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe told the National Nuclear Energy Conference on Tuesday. In a video message to conference, Motlanthe said South Africa had developed the complex overall systems required to competently operate and maintain a large nuclear power plant. “However, South Africa’s nuclear history goes back much further than that – it actually goes back to the mid-1940s, a period of over 60 years,” Motlanthe said. “This makes South Africa one of the oldest nuclear countries in the world. We have a long, proud history in the field of nuclear science.” Currently, state company Eskom runs the only nuclear power station in the country, Koeberg, located 30km north of Cape Town. The government has committed itself to producing an additional 9 600 Megawatts of nuclear power for the country’s electricity grid.Power plants ‘need to be spread geographically’ Most of South Africa’s coal and electricity generation is clustered in the eastern parts of the country, requiring very long high-voltage supply lines to distribute electricity across the country. Describing this scenario as “strategically unwise” in the longer term, Motlanthe said electricity needed to be produced in other parts of the country, which in turn required the use of energy sources other than coal. “Nuclear power is ideal in this sense, because we can build large nuclear power plants at points around our southern coastline, and potentially elsewhere in the future.”South Africa ‘could become nuclear exporter’ The construction of a nuclear power plant was a major task that would bring economic benefits to the local industry, which could play a major role in the construction and fabrication of nuclear power plants, Motlanthe said. “In fact, it is desirable that South African industry place itself in the position to be able to export nuclear power components internationally.” South Africa is already a world leader in the export of nuclear pharmaceuticals for medical use, exporting to some 60 countries. Nuclear analytical processes are also used constantly in industry, agriculture and elsewhere in the country. He urged the industry to forge international partnerships with companies in the nuclear sector, while calling on companies wishing to gain entry into nuclear power construction to ensure that they acquired the necessary quality assurance culture and practise at an early stage. “South Africa possesses a well-established system of nuclear facility operations. This includes construction and process licensing, nuclear construction and fabrication regulation, health and safety monitoring, and the training of the required skilled personnel. All of this is directly linked to general safety considerations.” Nuclear safety assurance was most important for public acceptance of the nuclear power industry, and South Africa’s strong record in this regard should be maintained as a primary foundation of the industry, Motlanthe said. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_imgMore than 90 days after hundreds of schoolgirls were kidnapped by Boko Haram rebels in north-eastern Nigeria, a United Nations envoy for the region got a first-hand account of the efforts underway to rescue the students and to fight terrorism in the region, and met with education activist Malala Yousafzai, who was spending her birthday in Nigeria to show solidarity with the girls and their families.In Abuja, Said Djinnit, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for West Africa, reiterated “the continued commitment of the United Nations to the unity and stability of Nigeria,” according to the UN Office for West Africa (UNOWA).He held consultations with Government officials and the leadership of the National Assembly, as well as heads of defense and security services, to review progress made in efforts to rescue the schoolgirls seized on 14 April in Chibok, and to address the larger crisis resulting from Boko Haram activities.During the five-day visit, Mr. Djinnit also confirmed that the UN has started to implement an integrated support package that includes support for the Chibok girls, their families and their communities, in particular with psycho-social counselling and helping them reintegrate with their families and communities.While in Nigeria, Mr. Djinnit discussed the support package with Ms. Yousafzai, who was spending her 17th birthday in the country by “standing with my Nigerian sisters and their parents.”Ms. Yousafzai, whose Malala Fund reportedly donated $200,000 for education in Nigeria, offered to partner with the UN efforts to mitigate the impacts of the abduction and help the girls return to school.Citing examples of young female students being raped and killed in India, and forced into child marriage in Pakistan, Ms. Yousafzai called on the international community to protect girls around the world. “No child anywhere ever should be the target of conflict or violence,” she said.Turning to the armed group responsible for the mass kidnapping in Nigeria, Ms. Yousafzai had harsh words about their interpretation of Islam.“Stop misusing the name of Islam. Islam is a religion of peace. Islam allows every boy and every girl to get an education,” she spoke to applause. “I would request you lay down your weapons, release your sisters.”The Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban for attending classes said she can relate to the Nigerian students.“This Malala Day is a day for education of every child, and is dedicated to my dear, dear and dear Nigerian sisters who are going through the same brutal situation which I suffered through in my past,” she said in reference to the unofficial holiday first marked on 12 July 2013, her 16th birthday.last_img read more