first_img(Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Fantastical scenarios with no evidence – sometimes contrary to evidence – continue to get good publicity in science venues.Imagining Dyson Spheres:  No one has ever seen a Dyson sphere (a theoretical way for an alien civilization to conserve all the energy from a dying star).  No one has seen an alien civilization, for that matter.  It didn’t stop Live Science from describing the “incredible technology” of Dyson spheres and how they will enable SETI researchers to find aliens.  Live Science took another step into Fantasyland by posting an “infographic” about objects we have no information about.  What would its editors think of an infographic about heaven, which arguably has more information from multiple sources?  Would that qualify for a science news post?  Yet Dyson spheres (imagined by futurist Freeman Dyson) were described as devices by which “advanced civilizations would conquer the galaxy.”  Presumably they would have to be intelligently designed, but ID is shunned by Live Science except for ridicule.Imagining superhabitable worlds:  National Geographic posted a discussion about planets that are more habitable than Earth.  None of these are known; they are only supposed as possible.  To its credit, the article gives views of skeptics who think the question is vacuous.  Still, “If superhabitable planets exist, and if we develop the means to find them, they may turn out to be more common than Earthlike planets,” the article speculates.  Just thinking about it “could broaden our chances of discovering life on other worlds,” the speculation continues, “because it opens up the possibility that there may be some super-Earth planets with appropriate conditions for life.”Imagining many ways to unguided life:  An extremely optimistic article about the origin of life was printed by Science Magazine on January 17.  In a response to pessimistic thoughts recently expressed by Steven Benner (see 8/28/13, 9/07/13 and 12/31/13), Jimmy Gollihar, Matthew Levy and Andrew D. Ellington are highly confident that science is on the verge of finding the way life evolved.  Indeed they are impressed with the “many paths to the origin of life” that create an embarrassment of riches:The origin of life remains a daunting mystery in part because rather than knowing too little, we increasingly know about too many possible mechanisms that might have led to the self-sustaining replication of nucleic acids and the cellularization of genetic material that is the basis of life on Earth.To speak so optimistically, they have to virtually leap over conceptual canyons.  Difficulties with homochirality, adverse reactions forming tars, the problem of compartmentalization and other daunting challenges (such as the improbability of reaching functional information from nonliving chemistry) are treated as low hurdles that primordial cells would rush forth to conquer like Olympic athletes.  Those cells could have even used teamwork:As RNA or an alternative precursor nucleic acid begins to self-replicate, protection from molecular parasites and the low concentrations of needed substrates become paramount in propagating chemical information content. Compartmentalization of the genetic/catalytic machinery would have necessarily been an early invention or co-option of a self-replicase. The demonstration of protocell division based on simple physical and chemical mechanisms lends credence to the idea that nucleic acid and vesicle replicators got together for mutual benefit.In closing Gollihar, Levy and Ellington point back to the Miller experiment for inspiration:The great benefit of the demonstration of prebiotic amino acid synthesis from a simple gas mix and an electrical spark was not that it was a cookbook for how things occurred, but rather that it was the identification of a plausible path to an origin of life that would continue to bear experimental fruit.Being translated, an experiment that failed to serve as a cookbook inspired other cookbooks that so far have cooked up only imaginary scenarios after 50 years of trying by intelligent cooks in the kitchen.This last article was ungodly awful; Baloney Detector apprentices should use it as a case study.  Its perhapsimaybecouldness index saturated our meters: 4 could‘s, 4 may‘s, and 5 might‘s in the short article (and those are only the overt indicators).  Faster than a speeding bull**it, more powerful than a “loco” motive, able to leap tall futilities in a single bound, it’s absurd.  It’s insane.  It’s Supermad.  Yet it was published in Science Magazine, not Marvel Comics.  These delusional sciopaths simply imagined solutions to every show-stopper the more realistic scientists and philosophers have wept over their beer about.  It “is easy to imagine how such simple replicators might have evolved in complexity,” they said.  (Speak for thyselves, dreamers.)  Later “an origin can be imagined that involves” blah blah blah, till, “Ultimately, a fully functional RNA polymerase should evolve from the heady broth of reactions in the primordial soup.”  Ah yes, primordial soup.  Old mythoids die hard.The perceptive Baloney Detector finds instances of personification scattered throughout the scenario: “it is possible that prebiotic analogs of these enzymes might have assisted in chemical syntheses” (contrary to the laws of chemistry), they presume; “millions of years of a poor replicator (a blink on the geological time scale) might well have been necessary to craft a feedback cycle” (there’s the moyboys‘ magic wand); replicators “got together for mutual benefit,” while a better replicator arises “that could better feed itself by directing the chemistry around it.”   Imagine that; a non-living molecule with a mind, will, and even leadership!  In other places they hid their Tinker Bell fairy in passive voice, speaking of “the evolution of,” or how things “arose” or “led to” this or that.Where is the science?  Realize that the actions of intelligent agents in a chemistry lab have nothing to do with their subject matter.  They are using intelligent design!  Listen: “Ribozymes have been crafted that make carbon-carbon bonds, glycosidic bonds, phosphodiester bonds, and others, and it is possible that prebiotic analogs of these enzymes might have….” blah blah blah, and so on, and so forth, etc.  What’s another word for “crafted,” students?  Intelligently designed!  How about “possible” and “might”?  Speculation!  You can’t design a robot and then speculate that rocks can do the same.  (Well, you can, but don’t call it science.)At one point, the authors used the word “unguided” properly: “Initial insights that biological compounds could be generated by prebiotic means quickly ran up against a gap in our understanding of how unguided syntheses could result in defined templates for replication.”  That’s what they are stuck with: unguided processes.  They need to keep their intelligently guided hands off the story and watch it implode.  These unguided molecules are simply not going to do what they need them to do.  (Notice that words like “prebiotic” build evolutionary assumptions into them by the power of suggestion.)It is atrocious that imagineers without a leg to stand on empirically can get away with dreaming on the job in science magazines and websites.  These are the same ones who refuse to consider intelligent design, which has tons of empirical backing for its scientific principles (e.g., archaeology, cryptology, forensics), as they repeat ad nauseum the long-debunked canard that if something is not 100% materialistic, it must be religious.  It’s about time to declare Tinker Bell worship as a religion: the preferred “mystery religion” of the scientism crowd.last_img read more

first_img(Visited 442 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Robot designers know that making things big is easy, but making them small is hard. How do you pack a multitude of capabilities in a tiny space? Consider these little guys.Tarantulas have eight eyes that are simple (like human eyes) instead of compound. Researchers found that they use their lateral eyes to calculate distance.Lycosa tarantula, a wolf spider found in Spain, hunts by ambushing its prey and dragging its meal back to its 20cm-deep burrow. Finding the way back, however, can be a math problem after darting this way and that in the chase. Science Daily says it “uses path integration to return to its burrow.” Did this little creature ace trigonometry class? “With this mechanism, it does not follow the same path back to its burrow; instead, it moves as though it had followed the sides of a right-angle triangle, returning along the hypotenuse.” Scientists in Madrid ran experiments in the lab. It must have been fun trying to paint the lateral eyes shut on these speedy runners. The researchers put the spiders through their paces on specially-designed arrays of black and white bands. What they found reveals an astonishing array of instruments packed into a tiny space:“To calculate the distance it has travelled, the animal needs an odometer that registers the route, its location with respect to the finish point, which would be the burrow, and a ‘compass‘ to track the direction of travel,” according to Joaquin Ortega Escobar, lead author of a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology on the function of each eye in these processes.The ‘compass’ would correspond to polarised light, which the median eyes use to measure the angle; direction is detected by the anterior lateral eyes. Through this research, the scientists have learned that it is principally the anterior lateral eyes (which until now had not been analysed), and to a lesser extent the posterior lateral eyes, that help tarantula wolf spiders measures the distance to their nest.Mosquitoes have some of the fastest wings in nature. Much as we despise them, we have to have a grudging admiration for a tiny creature that can flap wings 800 beats a second—four times faster than insects of a similar size. In Nature, Laura A. Miller describes efforts to understand the flight mechanics of mosquitoes (many species of which do not bite humans). Despite the fast wingbeats, which make that annoying whine, the thin wings only employ strokes of about 40° in amplitude—much shorter than in other flying insects. Science Daily says that the researchers at Oxford University, curious about the narrow wings and short beats, “predicted that they must make use of clever tricks as the wings reverse their direction at the end of each half-stroke.”How can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes?In particular, the researchers wondered how they get enough lift. Even a mosquito needs lift to fly. The answer, they found with cameras running at 10,000 frames a second, was by a rotation mechanism in the wing attachment muscle that induces vortices on both forward and backward strokes, gaining lift in both directions. This sounds similar to what Illustra Media demonstrated in far larger animals, hummingbirds (see Flight: The Genius of Birds). Miller compares it to the force one feels holding a hand out the window of a moving car, rotating it into and out of the wind. The researchers (who must have had amazing technology to measure lift on such minuscule wings) found that mosquitoes actually employ three mechanisms to get all the lift they can: (1) leading-edge vortex, (2) wake capture, and (3) rotational drag—a trick unique to mosquitoes.Could drone designers learn from these tricks of the mosquito? “Mosquito-flight investigations are certainly on their way to generating plenty of future research buzz,” Miller quips.Honeybees have better eyesight than thought, Science Daily reports. They can clearly discern objects at angles of a mere 1.9°, as small as your thumb at arm’s length, but that’s not all; they can make out objects at just 0.6° almost as well, a third as wide. This is 30% better than earlier thought, according to an Australian team that gave eye tests to bees. “Among other things, honey bees help to answer questions such as: how can a tiny brain of less than a million neurons achieve complex processes, and what are its utmost limits? In the last few decades it has been shown that bees can see and categorize objects and learn concepts through vision, such as the concept of ‘symmetric’ and ‘above and below’….“Photoreceptors in the visual system detect variations in light intensity. There are eight photoreceptors beyond each hexagonal facet of a bee’s compound eye, and their eyes are made out of thousands of facets!“Butterflies have an amazing mouthpart called the proboscis that lets them slurp nectar like drinking through a straw. Only they don’t need to suck; the proboscis is designed to bring fluid in automatically, by capillary action. These mouthparts are clearly shown in Illustra Media’s documentary Metamorphosis, which shows how after hatching from the chrysalis, the proboscis emerges in half-channels. The butterfly uses other mouthparts called palpi to knit the two halves together into a single channel. The proboscis can be rolled up into a neat little circle like a hose reel, and extended for use.Recently, Phys.org tried to unravel other mysteries of the mouthparts of butterflies. And like the “bee team” reported above, researchers at Kent State (UK) wanted to learn about this to imitate it. “An insect’s proboscis, a body part that allows them to drink liquids, acts like a highly-sophisticated sponge and straw that uses capillary action to send nectar or other liquids to the insect’s digestive system,” the team says. The channel size is crucially important for the type of liquid the insect needs to drink.The team’s findings show that capillary action is an essential and ideal method for removing small amounts of fluids from surfaces, Lehnert said. By copying this natural method, scientists say the mouthparts of flies and butterflies can serve as models for developing new devices for improved drug delivery systems.Even though engineers can only approach the efficiency of the butterfly proboscis, Lehnert attributed the insect’s design to evolution. “In order to feed on nectar and other liquid films, natural selection has favored the evolution of specialized mouthparts in fluid-feeding insects,” the press release writer says. Then Lehnert mixes convergent evolution with personification to portray natural selection as a refining agent:“It was previously known that flies and butterflies independently evolved mouthparts adapted for feeding on fluids, but what was unknown before our study was that they both use the same principles for ingesting fluids – capillary action,” Lehnert said. “Our findings have applications to the production of novel microfluidic devices that can be developed to mimic the functionality of insect mouthparts, which have the advantage of being impacted by natural selection over millions of years.“Ants rescue their dead. Did you know that? Neither did scientists; Phys.org reports that researchers in Europe, studying African ants, didn’t expect to see this. “We have observed helping behaviour vis-à-vis injured animals for the first time in invertebrates,” one said. For social insects where nest members are clones with no individuality, this is quite amazing; “obviously, it pays off for the colony as a whole to invest in the rescue service,” they say. The ants’ triage service will sound remarkably familiar to those in the human military:When an ant is injured in a fight, it will “call” its mates for help by excreting chemical substances. The injured insect is then carried back to the nest where it can recover after receiving treatment. What is the “therapy” like? Usually, treatment involves removing the termites still clinging to the ant.Dung Beetles seem disgusting, rolling balls of poop around to feed on, but they actually play a part in the balance of nature. And they have an amazing trick that has come to the light of science: they navigate by the Milky Way. Really! At The Conversation, James Foster of Lund University describes experiments to figure out how they do it. His team created an artificial Milky Way sky to watch them under controlled conditions. They found that it isn’t constellations that guide them, but the brightness patterns between the Milky Way and the other parts of the sky that help them orient themselves, so that they can roll their ball in a straight line.This brightness-comparison strategy may be less sophisticated than the way birds and human sailors identify specific constellations, but it’s an efficient solution to interpreting the complex information present in the starry sky—given how small the beetles’ eyes and brains are. In this way, they overcome the limited bandwidth of their information processing systems and do more with less, just as humans have learnt to do with technology.So there you have it: insects and arachnids with remarkable superpowers, using well-designed equipment. The genius in these animals is so good, scientists study it in order to copy it. Knowing what we have learned, it makes it hard to swat, step on, or spray these sophisticated little living robots.Don’t feel too sorry for that mosquito after your blood. This is not the “very good” world of the original creation before the Fall. Still, God has left enough evidence of his creative power to stand in awe of his wisdom. It should draw us to seek him, humble ourselves, repent, and trust in his way of escape from the consequences of sin.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Bryan Bush, a farmer from Edison, was elected chairman of the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff for 2016 during their December meeting at the Ohio Corn & Wheat office in Delaware.Bush has served on the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff board for 8 years, most recently as vice president. As District 7 Director he represents corn farmers in Belmont, Carroll, Coshocton, Delaware, Franklin, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Knox, Licking, Madison, Marion, Morrow, Muskingum, Tuscarawas and Union counties.Putnam County farmer Mark Hoorman, was elected as vice-chairman. He is in his fourth year of service and previously served as secretary. He represents corn farmers in District 1, which is Defiance, Fulton, Henry, Lucas and Williams counties.Rachael Vonderhaar, beginning her second year on the board, will serve as secretary. Vonderhaar farms with her family in Preble County. As District 8 Director, she represents corn farmers in Butler, Champaign, Clark, Clinton, Clermont, Darke, Greene, Hamilton, Preble, Miami, Montgomery, and Warren counties.Mike Stover of Richland County was elected as Ohio Small Grains Checkoff treasurer. He is in his second year of service to the checkoff. He represents corn farmers in District 3: Ashland, Ashtabula, Columbiana, Crawford, Cuyahoga, Erie, Geauga, Huron, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Richland, Stark, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne counties.The Ohio Small Checkoff board – which invests in research, market development and promotion, and education to increase wheat and other small grain producers’ profitability – consists of 9 directors representing specific districts.last_img read more

first_imgLaura Grant is an assistant professor of economics at Claremont McKenna College. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. Other outcomes are mixedDST proponents also argue that changing times provides more hours for afternoon recreation and reduces crime rates. But time for recreation is a matter of preference. There is better evidence on crime rates: Fewer muggings and sexual assaults occur during DST months because fewer potential victims are out after dark.So overall, the net benefits from these three durational effects of crime, recreation, and energy use — that is, impacts that last for the duration of the time change — are murky.Other consequences of DST are ephemeral. I think of them as bookend effects, since they occur at the beginning and end of DST.When we “spring forward” in March we lose an hour, which comes disproportionately from resting hours rather than wakeful time. Therefore, many problems associated with springing forward stem from sleep deprivation. With less rest people make more mistakes, which appear to cause more traffic accidents and workplace injuries, lower workplace productivity due to cyberloafing, and poorer stock market trading.Even when we gain that hour back in the fall, we must readjust our routines over several days because the sun and our alarm clocks feel out of synchronization. Some impacts are serious: During bookend weeks, children in higher latitudes go to school in the dark, which increases the risk of pedestrian casualties. Dark commutes are so problematic for pedestrians that New York City is spending $1.5 million on a related safety campaign. And heart attacks increase after the spring time shift — it is thought because of lack of sleep — but decrease to a lesser extent after the fall shift. Collectively, these bookend effects represent net costs and strong arguments against retaining DST. By LAURA GRANTOn November 6, public service announcements reminded us to “fall back,” ending daylight saving time (DST) by setting our clocks an hour earlier. On November 7, many of us commuted home in the dark.This semiannual ritual shifts our rhythms and temporarily makes us groggy at times when we normally feel alert. Moreover, many Americans are confused about why we spring forward to DST in March and fall back in November, and whether it is worth the trouble.The practice of resetting clocks is not designed for farmers, whose plows follow the sun regardless of what time clocks say it is. Yet many people continue to believe that farmers benefit, including lawmakers during recent debates over changing California DST laws. Massachusetts is also studying whether to abandon DST.Changing our clocks does not create extra daylight. DST simply shifts when the sun rises and sets relative to our society’s regular schedule and routines. The key question, then, is how people respond to this enforced shift in natural lighting. Most people have to be at work at a certain time — say, 8:30 a.m. — and if that time comes an hour earlier, they simply get up an hour earlier. The effect on society is another question, and there, the research shows that DST is more burden than boon. Pick your own time zone?Spurred by many of these arguments, several states are considering unilaterally discontinuing DST. The California State Legislature considered a bill this term that would have asked voters to decide whether or not to remain on Pacific Standard Time year-round (the measure was passed by the State Assembly but rejected by the Senate).On the East Coast, Massachusetts has commissioned research on the impacts of dropping DST and joining Canada’s Maritime provinces on Atlantic Time, which is one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. If this occurred, Massachusetts would be an hour ahead of all of its neighboring states during winter months, and travelers flying from Los Angeles to Boston would cross five time zones.These proposals ignore a fundamental fact: Daylight saving time relies on coordination. If one state changes its clocks a week early, neighboring states will be out of sync.Some states have good reason for diverging from the norm. Notably, Hawaii does not practice DST because it is much closer to the equator than the rest of the nation, so its daylight hours barely change throughout the year. Arizona is the sole contiguous state that abstains from DST, citing its extreme summer temperatures. Although this disparity causes confusion for western travelers, the state’s residents have not changed clocks’ times for over 40 years.In my research on DST I have found that everyone has strong opinions about it. Many people welcome the shift to DST as a signal of spring. Others like the coordinated availability of daylight after work. Dissenters, including farmers, curse their loss of quiet morning hours.When the evidence about costs and benefits is mixed but we need to make coordinated choices, how should we make DST decisions? When the California State Senate opted to stick with DST, one legislator stated, “I like daylight savings. I just like it.” But politicians’ whims are not a good basis for policy choices.The strongest arguments support not only doing away with the switches but keeping the nation on daylight saving time year-round. Yet humans adapt. If we abandon the twice-yearly switch, we may eventually slide back into old routines and habits of sleeping in during daylight. Daylight saving time is the coordinated alarm to wake us up a bit earlier in the summer and get us out of work with more sunshine. No energy savingsBenjamin Franklin was one of the first thinkers to endorse the idea of making better use of daylight. Although he lived well before the invention of light bulbs, Franklin observed that people who slept past sunrise wasted more candles later in the evening. He also whimsically suggested the first policy fixes to encourage energy conservation: firing cannons at dawn as public alarm clocks and fining homeowners who put up window shutters.To this day, our laws equate daylight saving with energy conservation. However, recent research suggests that DST actually increases energy use.This is what I found in a study co-authored with Yale economist Matthew Kotchen. We used a policy change in Indiana to estimate DST effects on electricity consumption. Prior to 2007, most Indiana counties did not observe DST. By comparing households’ electricity demand before and after DST was adopted, month by month, we showed that DST had actually increased residential electricity demand in Indiana by 1% to 4% annually.The largest effects occurred in the summer, when DST aligns our lives with the hottest part of the day, so people tend to use more air conditioning, and late fall, when we wake up in the dark and use more heating with no reduction in lighting needs.Other studies corroborate these findings. Research in Australia and in the United States shows that DST does not decrease total energy use. However, it does smooth out peaks and valleys in energy demand throughout the day, as people at home use more electricity in the morning and less during the afternoon. Though people still use more electricity, shifting the timing reduces the average costs to deliver energy because not everyone demands it during typical peak usage periods.last_img read more

Same song, different verse.The San Antonio Spurs — after defeating the Miami Heat in Game 4 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night — are one win away from a title. The score wasn’t close, 107-86 — the second game in a row that San Antonio dismantled Miami. But in Game 3, it was the Spurs’ offense overwhelming the Heat’s defense with a cascading set of inside-outside and side-to-side actions. In Game 4, the Spurs’ offense continued to perform at a high level, but it also tightened the screws defensively.The Heat scored at a rate of 99.1 points per 100 possessions in Game 4, more than 13 points lower than Miami’s playoff average. The Spurs controlled the middle of the floor, a factor that manifested in several ways.According to the NBA’s SportVU Player Tracking Box Score, San Antonio had an enormous rebounding advantage, not just in actual rebounds — 44 to 27 — but also in rebound chances (defined as any time a player is within 3.5 feetof a rebound), 68 to 46. The Spurs were consistently the aggressor around the basket.That aggressiveness also showed in Game 4’s shot-contesting stats. The Heat were 15 of 34 (44 percent) on shots in the paint. Coming into the game, the Heat had made 64 percent of their shots in the paint, by far the best mark of any team in the playoffs. The Heat — athletic and loaded with finishers — can score in the paint even when a defender is there to challenge a shot. But the Spurs have gotten more aggressive, and it is bothering the Heat in traffic.Miami’s Shooting WoesSan Antonio contested a slightly lower percentage of Miami’s shots in Game 4, but the Spurs were extremely effective, especially around the basket. The Heat couldn’t get shots to fall.The Heat have turned the ball over on 18.7 percent of their possessions in the finals, well above the 15.8 percent they had averaged in the regular season. Many of the steals the Spurs are generating have come close to the basket, stripping the ball from a shooter as he heads for the rim. On San Antonio, Danny Green and Kawhi Leonard have been particularly active in this regard, combining for 15 steals and seven blocks in the finals so far.The Spurs have strung together two of the best performances of the playoffs — one offensive and one defensive. It will take massive changes from Miami to push this series toward a competitive finish. read more

1Mike Trout28.61Mike Trout37.9 PLAYERWAR 5Alex Rodriguez22.95Ken Griffey Jr.30.1 5Al Kaline8.95Al Kaline15.4 3Ty Cobb9.53Ty Cobb15.7 2Ty Cobb46.7 As a result — and in concert with MLB labor mechanisms that force young stars to either play for peanuts through their arbitration years or lock themselves into long, below-market extensions (as Trout did in 2014, re-signing with the Angels through 2020) — Trout has produced a ton of surplus value for the Angels, relative to what he’s been paid. According to FanGraphs.com, Trout’s production would have been worth about $357 million on the open market since his MLB debut, a span over which he was paid only about $24 million.That’s why speculation that the Yankees are loading up for a Trout trade breaks down upon examination. At a glance, why not ship Trout away from a rebuilding team where his WAR is being wasted (aside, of course, from Angels fans who like to watch him play) to a huge market that has the prospects for a blockbuster deal? The answer: It would take a monster package of young talent to justify trading away a player who so outperforms his contract and probably will continue to do so for the next several years.If we apply Tom Tango’s simple WAR projection system with an average future value of $8.6 million per win,3Starting with a rough cost-estimate of $8 million per WAR next season, with 5 percent annual growth until 2020. the final four seasons of Trout’s contract figure to see him generate 32.5 WAR, for a market value of $282 million,4Including the yearly minimum salary of about $500,000. and be paid $122 million. So it probably won’t be until Trout’s next contract that the cost-benefit tradeoff of having him around begins to make a trade realistic for either the Angels or the team they’re negotiating with.At that point, the math gets a little silly. Even in the first year of his next deal, Trout’s WAR projects to be worth so much on the open market (roughly $75 million) that he’d need a truly paradigm-shifting contract — one that would basically double the highest annual salary of anybody in the game right now — to not be underpaid. With superstar free-agent deals, the question often isn’t whether they’ll be paid more than they’re worth, but by how much. Trout, however, is so good that it might be hard for him to earn fair market value even in his big post-prime payday.For now, that means Trout is probably stuck carrying the Angels. In the past, that would have also meant his chances of contending for the MVP were slim, despite his incredible individual numbers. But perhaps Trout’s win Thursday also signals a change in the way voting will be conducted going forward. The MVP electorate has been skewing more progressive for a while, in terms of its willingness to use sabermetric tools, and there’s nothing more open-minded than giving the MVP to the leader of a 74-88 team.But maybe it was also about Trout’s own particular greatness. No player has ever been so good at such a young age; it was likely that future generations would have looked at his repeated MVP snubs and wondered what the hell the voters were thinking to deny him the AL’s top individual award, over and over. WAR Through Age 22WAR Through Age 23 4Bryce Harper8.94Ken Griffey Jr.15.5 1Mike Trout48.5 3Ted Williams23.63Ted Williams34.2 a 3Mickey Mantle40.9 4Alex Rodriguez38.0 4Mel Ott23.54Mel Ott31.4 WAR Through Age 24 2Ty Cobb25.52Ty Cobb36.0 a PLAYERWAR 5Ken Griffey Jr.37.0 WAR Through Age 20WAR Through Age 21 2Mel Ott11.42Mel Ott17.9 Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout is widely acknowledged to be the best player in baseball and has been for quite some time. But for all his gifts, awards recognition has been hard for Trout to come by. Although Trout has led the American League in wins above replacement (WAR) for each of the past five seasons,1Ever since he first became a full-time player in 2012. he had only won MVP honors once going into Thursday night’s award announcement — and victory there was far from assured.Unlike in the past, though, when Trout’s horrid teammates were held against him in favor of some lesser player on a winning team, the voters broke with tradition and went for the player with stellar individual numbers. In winning the MVP, Trout became just the sixth player from a losing team to take home the hardware. It was a victory for the new ways of player evaluation and a more modern take on what the “valuable” part of MVP really means.But even if Trout hadn’t won the award, he could have taken the same solace he could last year: MVP or not, but he’s still tracking to be the G.O.A.T.Through every single age in which he played a full season,2Not including his age-19 season in 2011, when he logged only 40 games after a July call-up. Trout has been the all-time career leader in Baseball-Reference.com’s WAR for position players. It was true through age 20, age 21, age 22, age 23 and — after posting 10.6 WAR in 2016, a performance that basically matched his previous single-season peak — age 24. No player has ever started his career on this kind of tear — not Ruth, not Cobb, not Mantle, nobody. Mike Trout is (still!) the G.O.A.T. at any age Most career WAR through each age since 1901, among position players.Source: Baseball-Reference.com 1Mike Trout11.41Mike Trout20.7 read more

A Lorain County jail official has confirmed via telephone to The Lantern that Ohio State redshirt-freshman defensive lineman Tracy Sprinkle has been arrested and charged with rioting, failure to disperse, possession of drugs and drug paraphernalia.Sprinkle is scheduled to appear in court on Monday, according to a jail official.According to a Lorain County jail official, Sprinkle’s drug charges were not for possession of heroin.Sprinkle, who has yet to see the field in his time in Columbus, was a 2012 Associated Press first team All-Ohio selection out of Elyria High School. He enrolled early at OSU, joining the team in January of 2013.During his senior year of high school, Sprinkle recorded 103 tackles, including 19 sacks and 30 total tackles for loss. He was also the first defensive player since former OSU linebacker Matt Wilhelm to win the Lorain County Golden Helmet award, which goes to the best player in the county. Wilhelm won the award in 1999.As of Saturday evening, an OSU spokesperson had not confirmed the report of an arrest or suspension to The Lantern.It was first reported by Eleven Warriors that Sprinkle had been arrested and suspended from the team. read more

first_imgReal Madrid have reportedly named Marcos Alonso as a replacement for Marcelo, should he leave for Juventus this summerAlonso has made 88 appearances in all competitions for Chelsea since arriving from Fiorentina in 2016.However, it is understood that the 27-year-old would be open to returning to boyhood club Real Madrid at some point in the future.Mundo Deportivo reports that there is still a possibility that Marcelo may depart for Juventus before the end of the transfer deadline on Friday.Apparently, Real have now approached Chelsea to initiate talks over signing Alonso.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.Although the 13-time European champions would rather retain Marcelo for this season having already parted with star player Cristiano Ronaldo last month.The Portuguese star is keen to reunite with his good friend at new club Juventus.Meanwhile, Chelsea are unlikely to want to lose Alonso at this stage of the summer transfer window.The Spanish left-back has started each of their three Premier League games this season and still has another three years remaining on his contract.last_img read more

first_imgBayern München’s president Uli Hoeness, wanted to remind everybody that the German giants won’t be favorites vs Borussia Dortmund.If you thought that next weekend will be exciting only because England will have a Derby, Bayern’s president Uli Hoeness was gracious enough to remind everybody that Germany will also have Der Klassiker between the Bavarian squad and Borussia Dortmund.This match is arguably the biggest event in the Bundesliga every year, it usually has the bigger club as the absolute favorite but this season things are going to be very different.Dortmund is currently amongst the most exciting squads in all of Europe, their latest defeat against Atletico Madrid in the Champions League is no indicator of the real level of performance they have brought to the domestic competition this season.Bayern München’s top board members are very aware of how complicated next Saturday’s match will be and they won’t let the illusion of Dortmund’s latest defeat deceive them in any shape or form.The German giants have gotten too many negative results in the current season, this is what will keep them from getting too confident and the perfect excuse for them to go all out against the Bundesliga’s revelation.⭐️ #UCL-Gruppe A nach vier Spielen:1⃣ Borussia Dortmund (9 Pkt.)2. @Atleti (9)3. @ClubBrugge (4)4. @AS_Monaco (1) pic.twitter.com/kyYu0A4XlT— Borussia Dortmund (@BVB) November 6, 2018Regardless of how much power Bayern München has for this upcoming Der Klassiker, there is no way to overlook the sensational performances that many of the young talented players Borussia Dortmund have been delivering every single week.Starting with their ‘secret weapon’ Jadon Sancho, the young English international who is already established as one of the best players in Europe after only a few months of constant delivery of stellar performances for his new club.We can also mention the great first season that Moroccan left-back Achraf Hakimi is also having with Borussia Dortmund, the Real Madrid product who is destined to go back to Los Blancos and become the Marcelo replacement the club had been looking for so long.And what can we even say about young sensation Christian Pulisic, an already well-established star inside the club who is arguably amongst the most talented players of his generation and the United States’ best footballer today?All these kids are being led by German winger Marco Reus, an experienced forward who is starting to look like he could be about to have the best season of his career.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.”We have a young squad in transition, and a coach who has to implement his way without completely. You have to have a little patience.”-Uli Hoeness#FCBAEK#UCL[@altobelli13] pic.twitter.com/jbaMVL9cNO— Bavarian Tweets (@BavarianTweets) November 7, 2018All these elements haven’t gone through Bayern’s radar without getting unnoticed, the whole club is worried about next Saturday’s match and president Uli Hoeness already knows how difficult it will be for them to win.“You can’t go to Dortmund and say that you want to secure three points. Dortmund have had a very good season so far, no doubt about it,” said Uli via Goal.“We do not go to Dortmund as favorites, but as underdogs – for the first time in a long time.”“We have to make sure we play a good game there and then we’ll see what happens.”“Don’t always be so negative. The season has just begun, we have a team in transition, a young coach who has to settle in here and you have to be patient,” he added.“Four weeks ago you all complained that the Bundesliga is getting boring again and now it is no longer boring but exciting and now that doesn’t suit you.”“At some point you should agree on what you actually want. We’re doing you a few favors right now.”All what president Uli Hoeneß said in the mixed zone after tonight’s game. pic.twitter.com/ogK6rYxyyI— Bayern & Germany (@iMiaSanMia) November 8, 2018Who will win the next Der Klassiker between Bayern München and Borussia Dortmund? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

first_imgCroatia defender Dejan Lovren insists he is ready for a fiery clash against England on Sunday.The Three Lions host Croatia in their final group game of the UEFA Nations League and a victory against the World Cup runners-up will guarantee a place in next summer’s semi-finals.The Liverpool defender was part of Croatia’s squad throughout their impressive run to the final of this summer’s World Cup in Russia.Both teams know a win at on Sunday will see them top League A’s Group 4 and advance to the next stage, and Lovren is relishing the prospect of coming up against Gareth Southgate’s side.“It’s a final against England, so of course we will be strong,” he was quoted as saying by The Daily Mirror.“I think it will be a fiery game against them – they know us and what they can expect from us, and we will not run away from that.”Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“I love playing against England. I know the players in the Premier League and I have competed against them.”England and Croatia met earlier in the Nations League as they played out a 0-0 draw last month in Rijeka, and Lovren feels recent history will give Zlatko Dalic’s men plenty of belief.“People criticise me, but they didn’t say much when England didn’t score against us in the last game,” he said.“They will have extra motivation after the World Cup, but I think we will be brave.”“It will not be a friendly. We have beaten Spain and we want to win it now.”Spain will top the group, should England and Croatia play out a draw on Sunday night.last_img read more