first_imgTo adequately manage primary, secondary and feeder roads in the country would require US$100 million every year, for the next 20 years, Public Works Minister, William Gyude Moore has said.Minister Moore made the assertion yesterday at the Ministry of Information’s regular press briefing in Monrovia.He said the US$27 million provided by the government in this year’s budget for construction and pavement of roads is “very little, considering the huge challenges facing many roads in the country.”He said US$4 million within the US$27 million of this year’s budget is for road maintenance, while the balance US$23 million is intended for road construction.Minister Moore said since the inception of Madam Sirleaf’s administration, the government has focused largely on primary and secondary roads throughout the country, while partners continue to handle most of the feeder roads.“We may get involved in taking care of feeder roads, but for the next four years, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) will be financing many of its projects to ensure that communities and neighborhoods are connected,” Minister Moore said.He added, “450KM of feeder roads will be financed by USAID while we will be extending that program to the south east of the country to ensure that since our partners are active on feeder roads, we can focus on primary and secondary roads.”He said the government will continue to invest in primary and secondary roads to ensure that county capitals and major roads are fully connected across the country.Minister Moore explained further that the government and its partners have spent a little over US$700 million on roads, but their maintenance remain a cardinal issue, considering the heavy rainy season in the country.In a related development, the Minister also disclosed that Caldwell Bridge has been completed and plans for its official dedication are in process.He said Liberia’s road network is about 10,000km and many of the people in the rural areas have to walk several hours before reaching to the nearest road.“We have a very limited road network and less than 10 percent is paved. We are talking about paving the remaining 700km of roads including all major streets in the country,” he said.The ministry is focusing on paving streets in all county capitals at a cost amounting to US$2.2 billion.Primary roads connect to city capitals or lead to international borders while secondary roads connect to primary roads and feeder roads connect with farm-to-market roads, homes and other places.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgI don’t want to give up my desktop computer, but it seems like many people do.Dan Frommer at SplatFlays it all out: The PC industry is in decline. The Mac, which was growing while the rest of PCs were shrinking, is now shrinking, too. But if you add in the iPad and count all of Apple’s “computers” at once, the numbers are through the roof.It’s pretty clear what all this means. As Steve Jobs said, PCs are trucks, and tablets are cars. Most people don’t drive around in trucks. But the ones who drive trucks need great ones, and that’s where Apple is starting to focus its Mac efforts exclusively.Here in the U.S., at the peak of the George W. Bush era (remember him?), a trend began where people whose jobs entailed parking their car, going inside, and doing something on a computer began driving hulking monster trucks designed to resemble military assault vehicles. But after realizing over decades how much unnecessary energy those SUVs consumed, the trend swung back, and now many people conspicuously drive little hybrids instead.Consumer products can be like that. Trends swing back and forth like a pendulum as new technology becomes available to meet people’s tastes.The Tablet TrendWhat we see in Frommer’s amazing charts is the adoption of just such a trend. Yes, it may be that Mac sales declined 22% in 2012, the biggest drop in 10 years, but that fall in Mac consumption can’t come close to accounting for the soaring iPad numbers. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces jon mitchell Tags:#Apple#iPad#Mac The Real PC MarketSince the “what is a PC?” argument is not yet resolved, I propose this definition: A PC is a computer with a multi-window workspace and a pixel-precise input method. For now, though I think this part can change with good-enough voice interfaces, let’s include a physical keyboard, too.The PC market is surely subject to trends, but that 22% drop in Mac sales is not the end of the Mac trend. Apple knows that as well as anybody. In 2012, Apple shipped the first Macs with retina displays and a striking new iMac, which, as CEO Tim Cook pointed out in the Q1 2013 earnings call was not available for most of the quarter in which the low Mac numbers were reported.Why would Apple ship those products in a down year, fighting the clear trend against PCs? Because today’s PC market is the real PC market. The people who still buy PCs actually need them. It might be a pretty hard crash for low-margin PC manufacturers, but for Apple, with high-end Macs bolstered by roaring iPhone and iPad businesses, it’s just a chance to build the best, most powerful PCs it has ever made.And that’s not to say that Windows PCs are finished, either. It just means they have to be excellent enough for an increasingly high-end market.Lead image by Eliot Weisberg for ReadWrite. Chart courtesy of Splatf. Bottom image from Apple.  Certainly, there’s a use case for a tablet that replaces the point-and-click PC completely. It does a better job for lots of people, since the battery lasts all day and it fits in a handbag. Apple should be thrilled to sacrifice Mac sales in exchange for selling iPads to those people. The company is even betting that this trend will take a bite out of the enterprise PC market, and it seems a pretty safe bet.But the iPad was not the first $500 portable computer. It may (seriously) be the best one, but its astronomical adoption rate is not simply driven by the sudden realization by tens of millions of people that they can be more efficient workers on this device.Tablets are also entertainment systems. They’re an elective choice, like the choice of a Hummer or Prius over a used Honda. They’re trendy.Likewise, not everyone who bought a white plastic MacBook needed all its capabilities. They needed some of them, which a $300 Windows netbook also offered, and they wanted some of them, like the ability to watch Netflix in bed. But those people have the iPad now. It’s a better choice for those uses. And Apple doesn’t have to make that Mac at all anymore.center_img Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more