first_img January 18, 2019 Governor Wolf Announces $10.5 Million for Preschool Students SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced an additional $10.5 million to help preschool-age children transition to kindergarten. The funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services builds on the governor’s commitment to expanding early education for Pennsylvania’s youngest children.“I am committed to investing in young children and their futures,” said Governor Wolf. “That starts by continuing to make early education a priority for Pennsylvania. Supporting children as they move from preschool to kindergarten helps them succeed in the classroom. This early success creates opportunities for them to do well in school for years to come.”Since taking office in 2015, Governor Wolf has successfully worked with the state legislature to expand state-funded preschool by $115 million, adding more than 9,600 slots in Pre-K Counts, and an additional 1,300 in Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program.“Research shows that children with access to high-quality early learning programs go on to perform better in school and beyond,” said Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Secretary Pedro A. Rivera. “By investing in these programs, we are ensuring that students have the building blocks in place to succeed as they enter elementary school.”The Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning (OCDEL) applied for the federal Preschool Development Grant, which will be used to provide professional development for early learning educators and to promote partnerships among early learning providers, community agencies, and school districts to help children prepare for successful transitions from early learning programs to kindergarten. OCDEL is a collaborative effort between PDE and the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services (DHS).“Behavioral challenges can make it harder for children to succeed in education, especially when these needs go unidentified and unaddressed. Recognizing behavioral challenges early can help educators work with students so they do not become barriers to academic, social, and emotional development,” said DHS Teresa Secretary Miller. “This grant will allow early education programs around Pennsylvania to better meet the unique and complex needs of children they educate, setting a stronger foundation for success throughout all levels of education.”Funding will also support strategic planning to expand access to behavioral supports for medically eligible children birth to age 5, and recruit coaches currently in ECE programs to participate in a coaching support pilot project.More information about the Commonwealth’s early learning programs is available on the PDE website or the DHS website. Visit the Preschool Development Grant program for more information.last_img read more

first_imgAUCKLAND: New Zealand coach Gary Stead, on Tuesday, said he was a bit surprised by India’s abject surrender in the first Test but is expecting a strong comeback in Christchurch.India were all out for 165 and 191 in the two innings of the opening Test, leading to a 10-wicket drubbing in just over three days.”It was a bit of a surprise but it was also due to the pressure we put on those guys for long periods of time. You get Trent and Tim to operate in our conditions and both were outstanding,” Stead told reporters on Tuesday.The head coach also had a subtle warning for the Indian team, saying touring New Zealand could be as tough as playing in some of the other countries.”We want teams to believe that it is as tough in New Zealand as it is playing anywhere else in the world. That’s a pride thing.”Getting Ajinkya Rahane cheaply on the fourth morning was the clincher for Stead. After that, he knew that New Zealand would wrap it up quickly.”Guess picked up wickets at critical times in the match. We got Rahane out and it was the catalyst of the belief,” he said.India captain Virat Kohli had expressed a desire for his batsmen to come out with a positive approach, and Stead feels that a world class side like India would like to dominate the proceedings.”I expect Indian batsmen trying to dominate more and that will be a challenge for our bowlers because a world class side like India will come back hard.”Neil Wagner is back for the second Test after the birth of his first child and there is a possibility that the home team will go in with four specialist seamers in bowling friendly conditions at the Hagley Oval.”That’s always good selection dilemma to have as Neil Wagner is coming back. Kyle Jamieson made most of his debut in the outstanding manner that he played. Neil will be back (in the eleven) with us without a doubt,” Stead said.Asked if left-arm spinner Ajaz Patel will be dropped from the XI, Stead didn’t want to spell it out in as many words, even though that’s an imminent possibility.”We will always consider that (four seamers plus Colin de Grandhomme) as an option after looking at the wicket. I don’t want to make assumptions but yes, wicket at Hagley has a wee bit in it also.””We have seen that guys like Colin de Grandhomme can be very, very useful on this sort of a track. Whoever gets a chance needs to put up a performance like the first game because India will get better,” Stead said. AgenciesAlso Read: New Zealand head coach Gary Stead faces heat for missing India ODIsAlso Watch: ATDC Chairman Jayanta Malla Baruah attends BJP’s organizational meeting ahead BTAD electionslast_img read more

first_imgFollowing the disheartening loss to crosstown rival UCLA, the USC men’s basketball team (10-13, 1-9 Pac-12) will host the Utah Utes (16-7, 5-6) today with hopes of getting their elusive second conference win and halting their current four-game snide.Shining example · Senior guard Pe’Shon Howard led the Trojans with 16 points, including perfect marks from the three-point and free-throw line, in USC’s 84-66 loss to Utah last month. Howard averages 10.5 points per game. – Jojo Korsh | Daily Trojan USC made a visit to Salt Lake City earlier in the season and walked out the losers by a score of 84-66. The Utes controlled the game the whole way, but, like most games for the Trojans, USC fought to stay within striking distance before eventually biting the dust.In that contest, the Trojans struggled to contain Utes guard Delon Wright, as the Los Angeles native dropped 22 points.“Delon Wright really put us in a bind,” said USC head coach Andy Enfield after the game. “He drove the ball really well — got to the foul line 11 times.”In general, it seemed to most that the better team won that contest.“I thought Utah played a good game,” Enfield said.The Utes are not necessarily one of the elite teams in the Pac-12, but the Trojans have no right to overlook any given team. The excitement that surrounded Enfield and his squad coming into this campaign quickly turned into embarrassment when conference play began.The Trojans’ 1-9 mark in Pac-12 play is one of the worst in recent memory. Enfield will be given a few seasons to bring in the type of players that fit his run-and-gun system, but he certainly did not want to start off his tenure in Troy like this.In spite of all this failure, one of the surprising qualities that has defined these Trojans is their ability to continue playing hard. The on-court product has been abysmal at times, but no one watching a USC basketball game this season has seen the apathy that plagued the Trojans during the Kevin O’Neill era.Enfield, for his part, is continuing to see the silver lining in his team’s play, continuing to find signs of progress.“We’ve improved defensively,” Enfield added. “The last four games, we held opponents to 40 percent shooting.”Freshman phenom Nikola Jovanovic has been a big help in that category, and he too is choosing to remain positive and look forward to the next game.“When we do everything that Coach says in the locker room, we play real well,” the Belgrade, Serbia native said.Jovanovic’s early success is a good sign for the future of the program, proving that there is a light at the end of the USC basketball tunnel. But that light probably won’t shine for another couple of years.“Everyone wants to see our men’s basketball program be successful,” said USC Athletic Director Pat Haden of the team’s progress. “But it’s not going to happen overnight.”Fans can look forward to that success in the future. For now, they’ll settle for a simple win at the Galen Center tonight.last_img read more