first_imgAthletic Bilbao boss Marcelo Bielsa has snubbed two approaches from Chelsea, according to the Daily Mirror.Roman Abramovich is looking for another manager.It is claimed the 56-year-old ex-Argentina manager has dismissed talks with Blues owner Roman Abramovich’s representatives, insisting he does not talk to “people representing other people.”The Sun declare that Abramovich’s reign at Chelsea has cost him £2billion.And a number of papers pick up on interim boss Roberto Di Matteo’s comment on Friday that he has “no friends” at Stamford Bridge.Meanwhile, The Sun say QPR manager Mark Hughes has threatened to ban his players from using Twitter after Federico Macheda was hit with a £15,000 FA fine.On-loan  striker Macheda was found guilty of using homophobic language on the social networking site and recently posted foul-mouthed comments after being dropped by Hughes.Related West London Sport story: Hughes rules out Twitter banThe Independent and Daily Express have interviews with QPR chairman Tony Fernandes, who again states that he will not jump ship if Rangers go down.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Bryan Bush, a farmer from Edison, was elected chairman of the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff for 2016 during their December meeting at the Ohio Corn & Wheat office in Delaware.Bush has served on the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff board for 8 years, most recently as vice president. As District 7 Director he represents corn farmers in Belmont, Carroll, Coshocton, Delaware, Franklin, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Knox, Licking, Madison, Marion, Morrow, Muskingum, Tuscarawas and Union counties.Putnam County farmer Mark Hoorman, was elected as vice-chairman. He is in his fourth year of service and previously served as secretary. He represents corn farmers in District 1, which is Defiance, Fulton, Henry, Lucas and Williams counties.Rachael Vonderhaar, beginning her second year on the board, will serve as secretary. Vonderhaar farms with her family in Preble County. As District 8 Director, she represents corn farmers in Butler, Champaign, Clark, Clinton, Clermont, Darke, Greene, Hamilton, Preble, Miami, Montgomery, and Warren counties.Mike Stover of Richland County was elected as Ohio Small Grains Checkoff treasurer. He is in his second year of service to the checkoff. He represents corn farmers in District 3: Ashland, Ashtabula, Columbiana, Crawford, Cuyahoga, Erie, Geauga, Huron, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Richland, Stark, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne counties.The Ohio Small Checkoff board – which invests in research, market development and promotion, and education to increase wheat and other small grain producers’ profitability – consists of 9 directors representing specific districts.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The overall forecast it unchanged in its basic form, as we are only making a few tweaks to this weekend’s late precipitation chance. We remain dry through most of Sunday with sunshine and blue skies. Temperatures will work higher today and even higher still tomorrow before pulling back a few degrees for Sunday as clouds build. We look for daytime highs of 87-92 today and 88-94 for the weekend, with tomorrow being the hottest day. Humidity will be climbing slightly too, so heat index values will be in the triple digits for at least tomorrow afternoon, perhaps Sunday.  The map at right shows high temps for Saturday. The temperatures shown to the southeast part of the state are over done because this particular model does not handle the elevation changes of the Appalachians well, and is overzealous of surface highs because of that. Still, its going to be warm! Scattered showers move into NW Ohio well after midnight Sunday night, and will impact most of the state through the day Monday. Rain totals are still not that impressive, and we will keep a tenth to half an inch as our overall range, with coverage at 60% of the state. The chances of thunderstorms stay over Indiana, and with out that threat, higher rain totals we don’t believe are likely at this point. Rain likely is done mid to late afternoon in many areas, but we may see a few showers linger in far eastern Ohio into the evening. The map at right chows rain potential for the state out of the system through Monday evening.Dry weather is back for Tuesday on through the end of the week. We won’t rule out some scattered showers each afternoon Tuesday and Wednesday (Independence Day) but we don’t think it will be wide spread or have any intensity. As the week progresses, temps climb back up into a range from 88-92 over most of the state, meaning we are above normal, but not as warm as what we expect this weekend.We are leaving the extended period completely alone this morning. We may have to keep an eye out for a few scattered showers with 40% coverage around the 10th, rain totals of no more than .4”, and then we are dry again for Wednesday the 11th through the morning of the 12th. A strong front remains in sight late in the period, for the afternoon of the 12th through the 13th, with half to 1.5” rains over 90% of the state. We swing back dry with strong high pressure building in for the 14th forward.So, nothing changes in our thought process this morning. We are very warm short term, and rains definitely fall off from what we have seen for most of June. But, the rains that we do see around have good enough timing, and the moisture we have in our soil profile is good enough, that we should make it through mid-July with only concerns, not any real problem. But…the pattern will catch the eye of the markets, sooner or later.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Light snow moves into Ohio today with a minor disturbance moving quickly over the region. Action today look to stay rather localized. Scattered snow showers push into west-central Ohio near midday, and then continue to spread east as they slide south through the afternoon and evening. Everything should be done by Midnight tonight. Generally, we are expecting snow to be mostly limited to central and southern Ohio, about 75 miles either side of I-70. In terms of amounts, we are looking for a coating to an inch from in most areas. We won’t rule out a few flurries north of US 30 and a dusting in spots, but generally this is a central and southern Ohio event.  The map at right shows potential for today. We kick off a dry forecast pattern on Friday. We should stay precipitation free over almost all of the state from Friday through next Wednesday night.  We do have a significant storm complex exiting the central plains Saturday and moving across the Deep south. AT this point we are keeping all precipitation from that system south of the Ohio river into KY. We wont rule out a few clouds in far southern Ohio this Sunday and perhaps early Monday, but that is it. The rest of us see a nice mix of sun and clouds. This will be the longest dry stretch we will have seen in quite some time. Light snow moves back into the region next Thursday, bringing a coating to 2 inches to 70% of the state. A second wave of action hits on Friday as a strong low starts to pass to the south, but then hooks north into western PA. That means we see a significant increase in snow threat next Friday over eastern OH. We can see an additional coating to 2 inches in western OH, but in eastern areas, snow Friday through early Saturday can be significantly higher, with the highest coming near the lake. In addition, winds do look to be a problem. We can expect 20-40 mph winds statewide on Friday coming out of the north on the backside that a powerful low. If winds stay at our projected intensity, we would see blizzard conditions over eastern Ohio, and potentially even some nastiness in western Ohio. This event looks nasty right now…but has plenty of time to modify and put in a different track…so stay tuned. For the extended period, we continue to see an active 6 day stretch. Rains arrive on the 17th and linger into early the 18th, bringing .1”-.5” totals, mostly over the southern half of the state. Then as have another frontal complex arriving for the 20th. This one has rain potential of .25”-.75” with 80% coverage of the state south of US 30. Notice we continue to talk rain! While the nearby 10 window looks cold, particularly with a reinforcing shot of cold air this weekend, the 11-16 day period warms considerably, and we expect well above normal temps all the way through the 22nd. This will allow all precipitation in that extended forecast to stay liquid. This cold, dry stretch looks to us to be the best opportunity to finish up the late harvest and may be the best chance of the rest of 2018.last_img read more

first_imgLaura Grant is an assistant professor of economics at Claremont McKenna College. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. Other outcomes are mixedDST proponents also argue that changing times provides more hours for afternoon recreation and reduces crime rates. But time for recreation is a matter of preference. There is better evidence on crime rates: Fewer muggings and sexual assaults occur during DST months because fewer potential victims are out after dark.So overall, the net benefits from these three durational effects of crime, recreation, and energy use — that is, impacts that last for the duration of the time change — are murky.Other consequences of DST are ephemeral. I think of them as bookend effects, since they occur at the beginning and end of DST.When we “spring forward” in March we lose an hour, which comes disproportionately from resting hours rather than wakeful time. Therefore, many problems associated with springing forward stem from sleep deprivation. With less rest people make more mistakes, which appear to cause more traffic accidents and workplace injuries, lower workplace productivity due to cyberloafing, and poorer stock market trading.Even when we gain that hour back in the fall, we must readjust our routines over several days because the sun and our alarm clocks feel out of synchronization. Some impacts are serious: During bookend weeks, children in higher latitudes go to school in the dark, which increases the risk of pedestrian casualties. Dark commutes are so problematic for pedestrians that New York City is spending $1.5 million on a related safety campaign. And heart attacks increase after the spring time shift — it is thought because of lack of sleep — but decrease to a lesser extent after the fall shift. Collectively, these bookend effects represent net costs and strong arguments against retaining DST. By LAURA GRANTOn November 6, public service announcements reminded us to “fall back,” ending daylight saving time (DST) by setting our clocks an hour earlier. On November 7, many of us commuted home in the dark.This semiannual ritual shifts our rhythms and temporarily makes us groggy at times when we normally feel alert. Moreover, many Americans are confused about why we spring forward to DST in March and fall back in November, and whether it is worth the trouble.The practice of resetting clocks is not designed for farmers, whose plows follow the sun regardless of what time clocks say it is. Yet many people continue to believe that farmers benefit, including lawmakers during recent debates over changing California DST laws. Massachusetts is also studying whether to abandon DST.Changing our clocks does not create extra daylight. DST simply shifts when the sun rises and sets relative to our society’s regular schedule and routines. The key question, then, is how people respond to this enforced shift in natural lighting. Most people have to be at work at a certain time — say, 8:30 a.m. — and if that time comes an hour earlier, they simply get up an hour earlier. The effect on society is another question, and there, the research shows that DST is more burden than boon. Pick your own time zone?Spurred by many of these arguments, several states are considering unilaterally discontinuing DST. The California State Legislature considered a bill this term that would have asked voters to decide whether or not to remain on Pacific Standard Time year-round (the measure was passed by the State Assembly but rejected by the Senate).On the East Coast, Massachusetts has commissioned research on the impacts of dropping DST and joining Canada’s Maritime provinces on Atlantic Time, which is one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. If this occurred, Massachusetts would be an hour ahead of all of its neighboring states during winter months, and travelers flying from Los Angeles to Boston would cross five time zones.These proposals ignore a fundamental fact: Daylight saving time relies on coordination. If one state changes its clocks a week early, neighboring states will be out of sync.Some states have good reason for diverging from the norm. Notably, Hawaii does not practice DST because it is much closer to the equator than the rest of the nation, so its daylight hours barely change throughout the year. Arizona is the sole contiguous state that abstains from DST, citing its extreme summer temperatures. Although this disparity causes confusion for western travelers, the state’s residents have not changed clocks’ times for over 40 years.In my research on DST I have found that everyone has strong opinions about it. Many people welcome the shift to DST as a signal of spring. Others like the coordinated availability of daylight after work. Dissenters, including farmers, curse their loss of quiet morning hours.When the evidence about costs and benefits is mixed but we need to make coordinated choices, how should we make DST decisions? When the California State Senate opted to stick with DST, one legislator stated, “I like daylight savings. I just like it.” But politicians’ whims are not a good basis for policy choices.The strongest arguments support not only doing away with the switches but keeping the nation on daylight saving time year-round. Yet humans adapt. If we abandon the twice-yearly switch, we may eventually slide back into old routines and habits of sleeping in during daylight. Daylight saving time is the coordinated alarm to wake us up a bit earlier in the summer and get us out of work with more sunshine. No energy savingsBenjamin Franklin was one of the first thinkers to endorse the idea of making better use of daylight. Although he lived well before the invention of light bulbs, Franklin observed that people who slept past sunrise wasted more candles later in the evening. He also whimsically suggested the first policy fixes to encourage energy conservation: firing cannons at dawn as public alarm clocks and fining homeowners who put up window shutters.To this day, our laws equate daylight saving with energy conservation. However, recent research suggests that DST actually increases energy use.This is what I found in a study co-authored with Yale economist Matthew Kotchen. We used a policy change in Indiana to estimate DST effects on electricity consumption. Prior to 2007, most Indiana counties did not observe DST. By comparing households’ electricity demand before and after DST was adopted, month by month, we showed that DST had actually increased residential electricity demand in Indiana by 1% to 4% annually.The largest effects occurred in the summer, when DST aligns our lives with the hottest part of the day, so people tend to use more air conditioning, and late fall, when we wake up in the dark and use more heating with no reduction in lighting needs.Other studies corroborate these findings. Research in Australia and in the United States shows that DST does not decrease total energy use. However, it does smooth out peaks and valleys in energy demand throughout the day, as people at home use more electricity in the morning and less during the afternoon. Though people still use more electricity, shifting the timing reduces the average costs to deliver energy because not everyone demands it during typical peak usage periods.last_img read more

first_imgCaretaker boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is relishing the prospect of leading Manchester United out against old rivals Arsenal in the fourth round of the FA CupThe Red Devils booked their spot in the fourth round by defeating Reading 2-0 at Old Trafford on Saturday through goals from Juan Mata and Romelu Lukaku.Solskjaer, who started in United’s semi-final wins over Arsenal in 1999 and 2004 on route to FA Cup glory, believes his players need the challenge of facing top-level opponents.“Fantastic,” Solskjaer told MTV on his reaction to the FA Cup draw.“We need these games. These players need big games to be challenged.”Of course, everyone says we’ve won the last five games but [they have] not been [against] big opposition.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedSolskjaer praises Harry Maguire after Man United’s 1-0 win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Ole Gunnar Solskjaer singled out Harry Maguire for praise after helping Manchester United keep a clean sheet in their 1-0 win over Leicester City.“But you can only beat the teams you play and, for us to get tested and go to the next level, you need those games. And if you want to win the FA Cup, you have to beat everybody.“In the competition, United have claimed seven wins to Arsenal’s six with the other two meetings ending in a draw.Last month, the two sides settled for a 2-2 draw at Old Trafford in the Premier League.#MUFC have been drawn away to Arsenal in the #EmiratesFACup fourth round. The tie will be played between 25-28 January. pic.twitter.com/xnxUvc9qHp— Manchester United (@ManUtd) January 7, 2019last_img read more

first_imgIndian stock markets ended in the red Tuesday dragged by a fall in Asian equities on account of Japan’s central bank keeping prevailing negative interest rates unchanged after its meeting the same day. The S&P BSE Sensex slumped more than a percent to close at 24,551, down 253 points, while the 50-scrip NSE Nifty settled at 7,461, a loss of 78 points, or 1.04 percent. The biggest loser on the Sensex was Lupin which fell sharply in trade in response to the company informing the stock exchanges that the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has made nine observations after inspecting its Goa facility. The stock closed at Rs 1,726, down 7.59 percent from its previous close. Other stocks that pulled the Sensex down included HDFC, Dr Reddy’s Labs, Cipla, Sun Pharma and ITC. Gainers on the Sensex included State Bank of India, Tata Steel, Bharti Airtel and Axis Bank. The US Federal Reserve’s two-day meeting that begins Tuesday (March 15) would be a significant trigger for Indian stock markets on Wednesday. The Fed is expected to keep short-term interest rates on hold in view of global uncertainties, after having raised the benchmark rates from almost zero to 0.25-0.50 percent in December last year.The markets shrugged off retail inflation data released late Monday after market hours. Retail inflation was down to 5.18 percent in February from a 17-month high in the previous month.The easing of retail inflation is being seen as providing enough space for the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to cut the repo rate.”For the time being, a disciplined fiscal stance, larger than expected decline in IIP and a drop in CPI inflation have converged, and we continue to expect that the RBI will cut the policy repo rate by 25bp to 6.5% at its upcoming policy meeting (5 April),” HSBC Global Research said in a note.last_img read more

first_imgA woman casts her ballot during country`s general elections in Chegutu, Zimbabwe on 30 July. Photo: ReutersCounting began in Zimbabwe on Monday in the first election since the removal of former president Robert Mugabe, a watershed vote that could pull a pariah state back into the international fold and spark an economic revival.The election is a two-horse race between 75-year-old President Emmerson Mnangagwa, a long-time Mugabe ally, and 40-year-old Nelson Chamisa, a lawyer and pastor who is vying to become Zimbabwe’s youngest head of state.Mnangagwa is viewed as the frontrunner, though the latest opinion polls showed a tight race. There will be a runoff on 8 September if no candidate wins more than half the votes.Voting closed at 7:00 pm (1700 GMT). The official result has to be announced within five days but there will likely be an indication of the outcome on Tuesday.Zimbabwe’s electoral commission said voter turnout had averaged 75 per cent, higher than in the last vote in 2013.Zimbabweans are also electing 210 members of parliament and more than 9,000 councillors.The election winner faces the task of putting Zimbabwe back on track after 37 years of Mugabe rule tainted by corruption, mismanagement and diplomatic isolation that caused a crisis in a country that once had one of Africa’s most promising economies.A credible vote is essential if Zimbabwe is to exit painful sanctions and secure the donor funding and investment needed to stem chronic cash shortages.Chamisa said the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission was impeding voting in urban areas where he enjoys strong support but gave no evidence to back the claim.“The people’s will being negated & undetermined due to these deliberate and unnecessary delays,” he said in a tweet. The ZEC was not immediately available to comment. It has denied Chamisa’s previous allegations of bias.Reuters spoke to several international observers who said the voting process had been slow at some stations but it did not appear to them to be intentional.Chamisa said his Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) would win if there was no “ballot mischief”, making it likely he will challenge the outcome if Mnangagwa prevails. A contested result is likely to lead to street protests and possible violence.EU chief observer Elmar Brok said many voters, particularly young women, left voting queues in frustration at long delays. The EU has not yet concluded how to judge the vote, he said.Dozens of people were killed ahead of a runoff in 2008 between Mugabe and MDC-founder Morgan Tsvangirai, who died of cancer in February.Mugabe, 94, led the war for independence and since 1980 has dominated the country’s politics. But since he stepped down under military pressure in November he has lived in obscurity.He emerged on the eve of the election to announce he would vote for the opposition, surprising Mnangagwa who accused him of striking a deal with Chamisa.“Democratic Space “Mugabe made no comment to reporters as he cast his ballot around lunchtime accompanied by his wife, Grace. A huge crowd gathered outside, some cheering, many booing.Mnangagwa, a former intelligence chief, denied Mugabe’s claim that the vote would not be free since it was being run by a “military government”.“I can assure you that this country is enjoying democratic space which has never been experienced before,” Mnangagwa told public television after voting.Mnangagwa, of the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF), has been president since the military ousted Mugabe in a bloodless coup.Elections under Mugabe were often marred by intimidation, rigging and violence but the consensus is the build-up to this vote has been better than before, although Chamisa complained about a flawed voters’ roll and opaque ballot paper printing.“Victory is certain, the people have spoken,” Chamisa said after casting his ballot in Harare as a cheering crowd chanted: “President! President! The president is here!”“I have no doubt that by end of day today we should be very clear as to an emphatic voice for change.”Chamisa has attracted young and unemployed voters frustrated with nearly four decades of ZANU-PF rule.“I’ll vote for Chamisa because it is a vote for change, it is a vote for the youth. Tomorrow we will have a new president,” said Fabian Matsika, a security guard in Harare.Credibility“ZANU-PF is the only party that I have voted for,” said Elizabeth Kamhunga, 67, after casting her vote in Harare. “We may have made some mistakes but I think president Mnangagwa is the only person who has the interests of Zimbabwe at heart.”The European Union, the United States and the Commonwealth have sent observers.“It is exciting to see so many Zimbabweans casting ballots,” said former Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, co-leader of the National Democratic Institute’s observer mission.“However the public’s faith in the secrecy of the ballot is essential for the credibility of the process. We urge the authorities to do everything possible to ensure the secrecy of today’s vote.”Mnangagwa has made a big effort to win over foreign opinion; hosting Western ambassadors, courting investors and patching up relations with white commercial farmers who were violently evicted from their farms under Mugabe.last_img

first_img YouTube Will Make ‘Cobra Kai,’ Other Originals Free to Watch Later This Year Meredith didn’t announce a premiere date for “#SeeHer Story”; a rep said it’s pegged to debut in late summer or early fall 2019. The series will be distributed across all of People’s outlets, including the free PeopleTV online streaming network, people.com, and social-media platforms. Related Meredith also said it has a slate of 20 shows for Instagram’s IGTV vertical-video platform. Fifteen of those have already gone live, including Real Simple’s “Beauty on the Move” and Martha Stewart Living’s “Frosted,” which to date have garnered more than 20 million views, according to the company. Upcoming IGTV shows include Parents magazine’s “How I Mom,” starring actress Tiffani Thiessen.Jon Werther, president of Meredith National Media Group, touted the company’s first-party data to glean insights into consumer trends and its ability to leverage technologies including voice, artificial intelligence and ecommerce to support its advertising biz.“Our mission is to anticipate our consumers’ needs — particularly those of the 110 million women we serve — to inspire and fuel their imagination and to empower them to achieve as they make their everyday decisions,” Werther said. Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15center_img Katie Couric’s career as a digital storyteller continues: She’s been tapped to host “#SeeHer Story,” an inspirational weekly digital series spotlighting “often-overlooked women” for People magazine.The show is part of parent company Meredith’s slate of seven new shows centered around the #SeeHer movement, an initiative launched by the Association of National Advertisers to promote accurate representations of girls and women in media. Meredith — which completed the acquisition of Time Inc. last year — made the announcements Thursday at its Digital Content NewFronts event in New York at its downtown Manhattan offices.“I’m excited to partner with Meredith and People to inspire the next generation of young female leaders by telling the real and impactful stories of so many amazing women,” Couric said in a statement. “You know what they say: If you can see her, you can be her.” Walmart’s Vudu Sets Originals With Queen Latifah, Evangeline Lilly, Randy Jackson for Free-Streaming Lineup From 2013-17, Couric served as Yahoo’s “global news anchor,” hosting a regular interview series, and before that had a long career in TV including anchoring “CBS Evening News” and 15 years as co-host of NBC’s “Today.” Among other projects, she edits a daily newsletter, “Wake-Up Call,” through her Katie Couric Media shingle.Meredith’s #SeeHer slate — catering to its female-skewing audiences — also includes InStyle’s “#SeeHer Style,” which will profile notable women leading up to New York Fashion Week this fall, and “Badass Women” Season 2, a digital companion series to the mag’s monthly print and digital feature. In addition, InStyle is establishing a $30,000 scholarship program for young women.Others in the #SeeHer lineup include Parents’ “Moms Mean Business,” about working moms; Health’s “#SeeHer Wellness Warriors”; Rachael Ray Every Day’s “Like a Boss,” about female leaders in the culinary field; and Shape’s “Goal Crushers,” profiling women who have taken on big challenges for even greater causes.Meredith also detailed other new programming across its portfolio of 40-plus brands, including People, Better Homes & Gardens, InStyle, Shape, Parents, Martha Stewart Living, EatingWell and Food & Wine. (Meredith has sold Fortune and Time magazine, and it’s seeking a buyer for Sports Illustrated and Money.)The company said it is doubling down on what it dubs the “three Rs of celebrity”: red carpet, reality and royals. New shows in this category will run across the company’s owned-and-operated destinations, including PeopleTV, as well as social media platforms including Twitter.According to Meredith, the PeopleTV OTT service will triple its red-carpet coverage beyond awards shows to cover movie premieres, film festivals and other events. PeopleTV’s new talk show “Reality Check” (Monday-Thursday) is hosted by Lyndsey Rodrigues (“TRL”), who will lead a panel of reality TV stars, super-fans and entertainment journalists to chat about the genre’s latest developments. “Reality Check” is slated to premiere Monday, May 13.last_img read more