first_imgAn inquest has been scheduled into the death of an Inishowen man who was killed in a road traffic collision in 2017. John ‘Rustard’ McLaughlin died following a two-car collision outside Malin Town on February 21, 2017.John, who was a married father-of-three in Greencastle, was a hugely respected member of the local community. The decision was made by Donegal Coroner Dr Denis McCauley during proceedings in Buncrana Court on Wednesday, June 5.The DDP (Director of Public Prosecutions) in Dublin are now expected to make a decision by September 11, 2019.Inquest into death of Inishowen man to be held in September was last modified: June 12th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgRayn Tripp lead all scorers with 18 points, Theresia Dickey added 12 more and the McKinleyville Panthers subdued the St. Bernard’s Crusaders 53-42 in the championship round of the Lady Panther Classic, Saturday afternoon at McKinleyville High.“I like how our girls are playing,” McKinleyville head coach Anthony McClure said. “We still have a lot of improvements we can make, but the more wins like this that we can get as we head into league play means a lot for our confidence going forward.”McKi …last_img read more

first_imgRelated Posts Roberta Rottigni Tags:#cyber attacks#IoT#VPN Follow the Puck How Data Analytics Can Save Lives Roberta Rottigni is a tech blogger. Born in Italy but adopted by Israel, she loves writing, traveling, and learning about innovative, tech-related trends. She doesn’t leave the house without a good book in her bag! AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storage Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), despite their somewhat esoteric name, aren’t unknown to everyday users. Many people, including myself, use VPN apps or Chrome extensions like Hola to get onto sites that are blocked or otherwise inaccessible in certain countries.Many people find themselves using a VPN for the sake of convenience, very few implement one for the purpose of security.With the ever-growing popularity of IoT devices, however, it’s important to consider using a VPN as an extra security measure. IoT devices gather a variety of confidential data, which makes companies more than a little bit annoyed and apprehensive.  For IoT devices within the home, a VPN helps prevent sensitive personal information from passing into the wrong hands. For businesses, it helps shield confidential company data from potential exposure.Preventing Eavesdropping and LeaksThe eavesdropping potential for IoT devices — particularly for smart home speakers like the Amazon Echo — has caused skepticism and even fear about IoT devices in general. South Park captured these fears in one of its latest episodes. It’s a spoof in which Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos use Alexa to spy on and manipulate an unsuspecting public.Of course, South Park’s account is a hyperbole. But IoT devices, by their very nature, do collect hoards of personal or confidential information, leaving personal data especially vulnerable to hackers or spies. Within the home, for instance, a smart security camera gathers data about when family members are and aren’t home. A smart fitness device will know information about a person’s location, physical health and exercise habits — and what anyone in the house is talking about with their friends.VPNs not only encrypt data, but they also mask a user’s geographical location and IP address. Protecting this data helps prevent third parties, whether hackers, Internet Service Providers, government agencies, or others who might try to gather information about your activities. This means that other entities cannot infiltrate an IoT device and start eavesdropping or leaking confidential information.Protecting Against Common Attacks: Botnets and MITM AttacksA VPN can help protect against two common IoT attacks: botnets and MITM attacks.A botnet is a network of computers or other internet-connected devices that are infected with malware. The devices are controlled as a group, making it possible for hackers to launch large-scale attacks. These attacks can be conducted not just from computers but from all IoT devices as well; hackers can infect a large number of IoT devices with malware to create a botnet that they can use to debilitate a company or access its data. Using a VPN helps mitigate these risks by ensuring that the channel between an IoT device and its server are completely protected.Likewise, VPNs help prevent MITM (Man-In-The-Middle) attacks, which involve third parties intercepting network traffic — for example, between an IoT device and the network’s central access point. VPNs, by encrypting traffic, ensure that the data gathered from the IoT device is unreadable–even in the event that a malicious actor intercepts that traffic.VPNs and IoT Go Hand-in-HandWhile consumers and businesses love IoT devices for the sake of ease and convenience, there is a great deal of outcry over the security of such devices. No device, whether a smart home speaker or smart vacuum cleaner, is without such controversy.Business, as well as individuals, need to be cautious about the security loopholes that can come with such devices. For companies, there are plenty of recommended business VPN providers that will help ensure more secure operations without compromising on network speed. For everyday consumers, free VPN services, many of which are quite reputable and secure, work just as well.It’s ultimately the responsibility of the production side to make such devices more secure. As it stands, however, IoT devices have too little computing power to include inbuilt security features and encryption software.For now, it’s up to the users to take the first step in protecting themselves. In order to account for the lack of sufficient inbuilt security mechanisms, we need to make VPN use an inherent part of responsible IoT device use. Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T…last_img read more

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Georgetown, Guyana June 7, 2017 – The Caribbean Community (Caricom) has reaffirmed its support of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change following the US decision to withdraw from the accord. US President Donald Trump announced the withdrawal last Thursday saying that a renegotiation of terms was in the works. The US is one of only three countries not to sign the agreement which seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally. The decision is unpopular both within and outside of the US. Individual US states are working to comply with the accord outside of the federal government.In a statement, Caricom Chairman and Guyana President David Granger said although Caricom was disappointed by the withdrawal, the region remained encouraged by the many nations who have signed the agreement. “The need for global action to combat this phenomenon is past urgent…Our own commitment will never waiver. Our existence is at stake,” he said.  Granger added that Climate Change is an “existential threat” to the Caribbean which is made up of Small Island and Low-Lying Development States or SIDS. He also noted that the Paris Agreement on Climate Change was “more than just another international agreement on another complex international issue.” According to Granger, “it reflects the acknowledgment and acceptance that climate change is a global issue requiring global solutions.”Individual nation states have also denounced the decision. The Bahamas Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the withdrawal was a cause for concern and pledged to continue working towards ending Climate Change.#MagneticMediaNews#ParisAgreement #ClimateChange Bahamas to take 15-member delegation to CARICOM meeting set in Mo’Bay, Jamaica Recommended for you CARICOM Inter-Sessional Meeting discussions conclude on high notecenter_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, CARICOM, climate change, donald trump, Paris Agreement Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp UN SG is Special Guest at Opening Ceremony for CARICOM Heads Meeting Wednesdaylast_img read more

first_imgThis combination of pictures created on 8 January shows files photos of FBI Director Robert Mueller (L) on 19 June 2013, in Washington, DC; and US President Donald Trump on 15 December 2017, in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPUS prosecutors revealed Friday that a Russian offered cooperation to Donald Trump’s campaign as early as 2015, declaring that the president’s ex-lawyer Michael Cohen had provided “relevant” and “substantial” help to the Russia investigation.In a separate case, federal prosecutors demanded “substantial” jail time of between 51 to 63 months—four to five years—for Cohen for bank fraud and campaign finance violations to which he plead guilty last August.US Attorney Robert Khuzami accused the 52-year-old, who once vowed to take a bullet for the president, of being motivated by “personal greed” and of “repeatedly” using his power and influence for “deceptive ends.”“Totally clears the President. Thank you!” tweeted the US president cryptically as television networks were consumed by the Cohen documents—which the White House dismissed as revealing “nothing of value.”The campaign finance violations to which Cohen pleaded guilty in August concerned hush payments he made on Trump’s behalf to alleged former lovers of the president, including porn star Stormy Daniels.Robert Mueller, the special counsel heading up the probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 vote, followed up with a separate filing saying Cohen had made “substantial and significant efforts to remediate his misconduct, accept responsibility for his actions, and assist” the special investigation, a thorn in Trump’s side.Cohen continued to provide “relevant and truthful information” to assist the probe, holding seven sessions with investigators, “many of them lengthy, and continues to make himself available to investigators,” it said.He had provided information about contacts with Russian interests during the campaign, attempts by Russians to reach the campaign and about contacts with “persons connected to the White House” in 2017-2018, the filing added.Around November 2015, some five months after Trump launched his bid for the presidency and well before previously reported contacts, Cohen spoke to a purported “trusted person” in the Russian Federation who offered the campaign “political synergy” and “synergy on a government level.”Cohen said the person “repeatedly proposed” a meeting between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, claiming it could have a “phenomenal” impact “not only in political but in a business dimension as well.”“Cohen, however, did not follow up on this invitation,” the filing added.Trump claims ‘cleared’The former fixer last week pleaded guilty to lying to Congress in connection with a Moscow real estate deal, which was being pursued as late as one month before Trump officially became the Republican nominee for president.Due to his help, Mueller declined to recommend additional jail time for Cohen for lying to Congress.Recent filings in the Mueller probe have suggested the White House knew that Cohen planned to lie to lawmakers about his contacts with Russians.They also suggest Trump and his family were in the loop on discussions with Russians on a Moscow project, even after the real estate tycoon secured the Republican nomination in mid-2016.Trump’s spokeswoman Sarah Sanders dismissed the latest filings in Cohen’s case, saying they “tell us nothing of value that wasn’t already known.”“Mr Cohen has repeatedly lied and as the prosecution has pointed out to the court, Mr Cohen is no hero,” she said.But Mueller has been inching ever closer to the White House, and early on Friday Trump fired off a feverish volley of tweets against a probe he dubs a “witch hunt,” accusing Mueller of “big time conflicts of interest” and alleging the prosecutor coerced false testimony from witnesses.The commander-in-chief vowed his lawyers would produce a “major Counter Report” to rebut Mueller’s findings, as and when he delivers them.Attorney general switchShortly afterward, Trump announced his intention to nominate William Barr as his new attorney general—succeeding Jeff Sessions, who he sacked last month.Sessions had angered the president by recusing himself from overseeing the Mueller probe because of his own contacts with Russian officials.Barr—a former attorney general under the late George HW Bush—is considered something of a consensus candidate for the highly sensitive post.He does, however, have a record of endorsing strong executive powers, which could come into play if Mueller sought to compel Trump to testify.Barr has also voiced concerns about a number of Mueller’s team donating to the Democratic Party.Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer warned Barr must commit, under oath, that the Russia investigation “will proceed unimpeded” and that the final report will be made available to Congress and the public “immediately.”In Washington, Mueller also detailed multiple “lies” that former Trump campaign chief Paul Manafort told investigators, leading to a termination of his cooperation deal, which could lead to a stiffer jail sentence for the 69-year-old.A heavily redacted court filing said that Manafort’s “lies” included untruths about his dealings with Konstantin Kilimnik, a business associate who US officials suspect is a Russian intelligence operative, and about his contacts with Trump administration officials after striking a plea agreement.The White House similarly dismissed that filing, arguing it “says absolutely nothing about the President.”“Once again the media is trying to create a story where there isn’t one,” said Sanders.last_img read more