first_img You, an astronomer: Look at this majestic black hole!Me, a birder: oh. oh no pic.twitter.com/yZT97JKFZO— Rosemary Mosco (@RosemaryMosco) April 10, 2019 Online Sci-Tech Cosmic dead ringers: 27 super strange-looking space objects 0 #BlackHole Katamari sun pic.twitter.com/YZqFRIT6wN— marisa losciale (@marisalosc) April 10, 2019 First-ever photo of a Black Hole (2019)Captured by Event Horizon Telescope.TWIN PEAKS. Part 8. “Gotta Light?” (2017)Directed by David Lynch.#EHTBlackHole #M87 #NASA #TwinPeaks pic.twitter.com/YO48WPQi3y— Black Lodge Cult (@BlackLCult) April 10, 2019 Now playing: Watch this: used Photoshop’s shake reduction filter on the Black Hole photo and was amazed by the result#EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/RLBPyuIx3T— Paul Scott Canavan (@abigbat) April 10, 2019 How black holes swallow light, warp space-time and blow… But the black hole is giving us more than just the evil eye. It also resembles certain breakfast foods. Artist Paul Scott Canavan says he used Photoshop’s shake reduction filter to clarify the picture. What he got was a cosmic doughnut. This photo of the black hole is awesome, but wait… Enhance! Hmm, enhance! One more time, enhance! Whoa. The biggest Cinnamon Raisin Bagel in the world, and it’s still hot! #EHT #EventHorizonTelescope pic.twitter.com/aPDVtLHF2u— Gabor Heja (@gheja_) April 10, 2019 Space So, here’s the first photo ever taken of a black hole. And also here’s the album cover for Soundgarden “Superunknown”, which contained the song “Black Hole Sun” 🤯#EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/m7zUQYIUmR— José Morales-González (@josemorgo) April 10, 2019 Share your voice Twin Peaks fans found a parallel image in director David Lynch’s return series. I see Disney’s remake of THE BLACK HOLE has finally escaped development hell. pic.twitter.com/YZMlGFqCUT— Phillip Bastien (@PABastien) April 10, 2019 Science cartoonist and author Rosemary Mosco is a birder. She sees a bird’s eye. 6:32 Enlarge ImageOn April 10, Event Horizon Telescope researchers unveiled the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.  National Science Foundation Behold the majesty of science. We’ve just seen the first ever image of a black hole. Now let’s make silly jokes about it.The Event Horizon Telescope project, which consists of an international network of radio telescopes, revealed a mind-blowing glimpse of an actual black hole on Wednesday. It looks like a fuzzy lopsided circle with a gradation of red, orange, yellow and white colors with a dark center.    The black hole picture is shaping up to be a Rorschach test. What you see will depend on your hobbies and interests, and just how hungry you are when you’re looking at it. Originally published April 10, 8:48 a.m. PT. Update, 2:23 p.m. PT: Added Google’s black hole doodle.   System administrator Gabor Heja went in a less sugary direction and discovered the black hole is actually the biggest cinnamon raisin bagel in the world, and it’s still hot. Google couldn’t resist getting in on the fun. It launched a Google Doodle featuring an animation of the black hole sucking down the Google letters.googledoodleblackholeEnlarge ImageGoogle unveiled an animation of the black hole in action. Google screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET Children of the ’90s now all have the 1994 Soundgarden hit Black Hole Sun stuck in their heads. Twitter user José Morales-González noticed a certain likeness between the Event Horizon image and the cover for Soundgarden’s Superunknown album. Rumors of a reboot of Disney’s 1979 sci-fi flick The Black Hole are getting a fresh look. “I see Disney’s remake of The Black Hole has finally escaped development hell,” tweeted screenwriter Phillip Bastien. Firefox communication design lead Sean Martell noticed a very familiar logo lurking in the black hole’s bright circle. 27 Photos Tags So NASA finally let us see what a #BlackHole looks like and it was the Eye of Sauron this whole time. pic.twitter.com/0QYJtsi20j— Andrew Athias (@AndrewAthias) April 10, 2019 Post a comment If you’ve ever played the Katamari Damacy games, you’ll appreciate this joke: At first glance, every hobbit-loving Lord of the Rings fan noticed the black hole’s resemblance to the Eye of Sauron. They’ve found our origins, @Firefox. #EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/3k0IqjNXsZ— mart3ll+ (@mart3ll) April 10, 2019last_img read more

first_imgMichael Stravato for The Texas TribuneJeremy Boutor removes personal items on an air mattress from his home in a neighborhood along Eldridge Parkway, flooded by waters released from Addicks Reservoir on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017, adding to flooding from Hurricane Harvey.The U.S. House of Representatives passed a major disaster relief bill Monday evening, concluding a series of dramatic delays in Congress and sending the legislation to the desk of President Trump.The $19.1 billion bill, which Trump is expected to sign, would allocate funding to nine disaster-affected states and two territories, and also release more than $4 billion to Texas that Congress allocated more than a year ago in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. After meeting unexpected resistance in the House that stalled the vote for 11 days, the bill at last broke through Monday by an overwhelming, bipartisan margin of 354-58.The bill passed in the U.S. Senate just before the Memorial Day recess but hit an obstacle when it reached the House floor. Most members had already left Washington for the holiday. Backers of the legislation had hoped to push it through on a voice vote before the recess. These efforts were thwarted by U.S. Rep. Chip Roy, an Austin Republican, who drew national attention for his blocking of the vote by using a procedural objection. Two other conservative House members later made similar objections, ensuring that Congress couldn’t send the bill to Trump until after the recess.The resistance in the House appeared to come as a surprise to Senate Republicans, including Texan John Cornyn, whose contributions were instrumental in breaking the Senate logjam and applying pressure on the White House to take swift action. A key provision of the bill is a White House “shot clock,” implemented by Cornyn, which would require the Office of Management and Budget to release more than $4 billion in disaster aid owed to Texas within a 90-day window.Given the bipartisan support for natural disaster relief, securing relief funding has proved surprisingly difficult in recent years. The new bill was pushed through Congress only after the Trump administration dropped demands that the package exclude disaster aid for Puerto Rico and include allocations for the Department of Homeland Security to address the migrant crisis at the border.And for Texas, the forestalled success of the new bill caps a prolonged struggle by the state’s delegation to secure aid promised over a year ago. After Congress approved more than $16 billion in disaster relief funds in early 2018, efforts by Texas representatives to secure the state’s share have been frustrated by bureaucratic hurdles in OMB and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Most recently, U.S. Rep. Lizzie Pannill Fletcher, a Houston Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Randy Weber, a Friendswood Republican, introduced a bill with similar language to Cornyn’s provision demanding that HUD release the long overdue $4 billion to Houston-area districts still recovering from Hurricane Harvey.Local advocates for communities still recovering from Hurricane Harvey expressed frustration at yet another delay in the federal funds. Hurricane season started on June 1 and coastal communities in Texas are already seeing flooding amid strong recent storms.Even with the addition of Cornyn’s “shot clock,” the wait for disaster relief funding will continue. If President Trump signs the bill immediately, OMB will not have to release its funding until late summer, after the worst of hurricane season has already passed.This post was originally published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.  Sharelast_img read more