first_img Recommended for you Exercise Design Training Workshop 22nd – 26th February 2016 HOA Opens, slew of Health Bills on Agenda; Key questions to Border Control Minister Related Items:Chikungunya, chikv, ministry of health, Portia smith Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 19 Nov 2014 – During House of Assembly debate his week, Minister Porsha Smith for Health and Human Services assured that more money from TCIG has enabled her Environmental Health Department to step up on its vector control program during this rainy season. Temporary officers have been hired she said in a ministerial statement and it was explained that there will be more messages on what to do to control both ChikV and Dengue Fever. While there is a call on the general public to partner on protecting from these mosquito borne viruses, no details were given on exactly how the Ministry or Department plans to deal with public education. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Beautiful girls on Beautiful beaches, Turks and Caicos scores with Sports Illustratedlast_img read more

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington’s Heav’nly Donuts is now under new ownership.Owner Dimitrios Saragas, son of the company’s founders, recently announced a Grand Re-Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony will take place on Tuesday, June 26, from 10am to noon, at its 579 Main Street location.The event will feature:A formal ribbon cutting ceremony with the Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce and Town Officials at 11am.Kiss 108’s DJ Romeo will offer music and prizes.Face painting and balloons for the kids.In addition, ALL DAY LONG, customers will receive FREE medium coffee (hot or iced, any flavor). Excluded expresso drinks. Limit 1 per customer.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTOS: Heav’nly Donuts Holds Grand Reopening, Founding Family Returns To WilmingtonIn “Photo of the Day”NATIONAL DONUT DAY: Wilmington’s Dunkin’ Donuts & Heav’nly Donuts Offering Free Donut Deal TODAY (June 7)In “Business”BUSINESS BRIEF: Wilmington’s Strive Fitness To Celebrate Grand ReopeningIn “Business”last_img read more

first_imgRatha Yatra, the chariot festival of Sri Jagannath Dev and one of the major festivals of the Hindu community, will begin tomorrow.The festival will come to an end with Ulto Ratha Yatra (reverse journey) on 3 July.In observance of the festival, different religious bodies and temple committees have drawn up various programmes. The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKON) has chalked out a nine-day programme in Dhaka.The country’s largest Ratha Yatra festival will be held at Dhamrai in Manikganj district.The programmes of the festival begins in the morning with rendering of Harisangkirtan, holding of Agnihotra Jagna seeking world peace and people’s welfare, recitation of verses from Srimat Bhagabat Geeta, distribution of mohaprosad, discussion, rendition of padaboli kirtan and arati, cultural function, staging of religious drama and screening of religious films.The programmes of the ISKON at Swamibag in Dhaka starts with holding of Agnihotra Jagna seeking divine blessings for world peace and people’s welfare. At noon, a discussion will be organised on its premises.Civil aviation and tourism minister Rashed Khan Menon will attend the discussion as the chief guest.Indian High Commissioner in Dhaka Harsh Vardhan Shringla will formally inaugurate the festival there by lighting “Mongol Pradeep” (lamp of welfare) after the discussion.Later in the afternoon, a colourful procession will be brought out from Swamibagh setting images of Sri Jagannath Dev, his brother Sri Balaram and sister Srimati Subhadra on three largely build Rathas (chariots).Then the devotees will pull the ropes of the chariots through Tikatuli, Ittefak intersection, Shapla Chattar, Dainik Bangla, Purana Paltan intersection, National Press Club, High Court crossing, Doel Square, Dhaka University TSC, Jagannath Hall, Palashi Crossing and rounded up the Ratha Yatra on the premises of the Dhakeswari National Temple.Besides, the Rathjatra festival will also be celebrated at Ramseeta Mandir at Joikali Mandir Road, at Shankharibazar and Jagannath Jeo Mandir at Tantibazar in old city and other places across the country.The Traffic Division of Dhaka Metropolitan Police (DMP) requested the vehicle drivers to use diversion roads for the sake of smooth and peaceful holding of Ratha Yatra.last_img read more

first_imgDonald Trump. File PhotoUS president Donald Trump will sign an order recognising Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights when he meets prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Washington on Monday, Israel’s foreign minister said.”President Trump will sign tomorrow in the presence of PM Netanyahu an order recognising Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” Foreign Minister Israel Katz wrote on Twitter on Sunday.Again breaking with longstanding international consensus, Trump said on Thursday that the United States should acknowledge Israeli sovereignty over the strategic plateau it seized from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War.He however left unanswered if or when he would follow through with an order to do so.Netanyahu has long pushed for such recognition, and many analysts saw Trump’s statement, which came in a tweet, as a campaign gift ahead of Israel’s April 9 polls.The prime minister is locked in tough election campaign with a centrist political alliance headed by former military chief Benny Gantz and ex-finance minister Yair Lapid.Syria and other states in the region condemned Trump’s pledge, saying it violates international law. France said the same.Israel annexed the Golan in 1981 in a move never recognised by the international community.The decision is the latest major move in favour of Israel by Trump, who in 2017 recognised the disputed city of Jerusalem as the country’s capital.last_img read more

first_img Share – / 3Harris County Attorney Vince Ryan sued Arkema, Inc., over chemical fires that broke out at the plant located in Crosby when it was flooded by Hurricane Harvey.The suit alleges the company violated Texas air and water pollution laws when the chemicals burned and wastewater tanks overflowed because of the flooding.The suit also claims the company doesn’t have floodplain permits it’s supposed to have for multiple structures at the plant. The county said air tests detected volatile organic compounds, which can cause cancer, more than 1 mile (1.61 kilometers) outside a 1.5-mile (2.41-kilometer) evacuation zone created before fires began.After flooding shut off power in August, the plant couldn’t cool and stabilize its organic peroxides.Arkema lawyer Rusty Hardin issued a written statement saying the sides had been discussing a resolution and “suing a victim is never the right solution to a natural disaster.”County Pollution Control Services Department claiming VOC detected far outside the 1.5 mile evacuation zone. First time a government source is claiming this.https://t.co/4VJnAAnI2B— Matt Dempsey (@mizzousundevil) November 16, 2017Read related coverage:WATCH: Investigators Say Harvey Chemical Plant Fires Should Be Wake-Up Call For IndustryAgency: Texas Chemical Plant Unprepared For Hurricane HarveyAfter Chemical Fires, Texans Worry About Toxic EffectsHere’s What Happened In The Hours After Hurricane Harvey Hit A Chemical Plant, According To A Staff Loglast_img read more

first_imgThe doomsday scenarioVoter registration databases were being breached. Pundits were loudly questioning the integrity of the election. Americans’ confidence that their votes would be counted fairly and accurately hung in the balance — with widespread chaos looming just on the horizon.Elections officials from more than 35 states huddled in groups; every time they decided to fund a new resource or deploy a new strategy, news of a new vulnerability sprouted. Reporters hounded for answers, as government employees received highly targeted phishing emails designed to coax their passwords. Simultaneously, a virus penetrated government devices by coming through the printers, which were connected to the internet.It was voting problem whack-a-mole. The way the election directors handled the pandemonium would determine the future of American democracy.Luckily, this time, it was only a drill.The 150 or so officials gathered at Harvard University for a worst-case scenario exercise meant to push the officials’ abilities to prepare and react in the case of a broader attack than America saw from Russia leading up to 2016.Arizona director of elections Eric Spencer, an Iraq war veteran, compared the preparations he and his team are making to his training as an infantry officer.“We always trained harder in the United States for combat to make it easier when we got overseas, and I see this as the same thing,” he said. “[Crisis scenarios] were nearly non-existent a few years ago. In 2016, before we got information that elections were subject to foreign interference, it was in the back of our mind but now it’s probably the number one item in our mind.”Most of the focus so far has been on the more than dozen states still using electronic voting machines that don’t provide a paper backup trail; experts say these machines could allow potential hacks or even technological glitches to go undetected.In its most recent spending bill, Congress has allocated $380 million for voting security, but the funding will be allocated across all 50 states by population in a way that won’t necessarily address the vulnerabilities of electronic voting machines anytime soon.In fact, it isn’t clear how much of a dent that money might make overall because no one, including the federal government, knows for sure how much American elections cost in the first place.“Figuring out the true cost of election administration in this country is the white whale of the discipline,” said Doug Chapin, an elections researcher at the University of Minnesota. “I don’t think we even have a really good estimate …. which is why it can be difficult when policy makers, say ‘OK, how much do you need?’ Usually the answer is: ‘more.’” Drew Anthony Smith/Getty ImagesA pedestrian walks past Austin City Hall, an early voting center, in March. Texas was the first state to go to the polls to vote in midterm primaries. As America heads toward the 2018 midterms, there’s an elephant in the voting booth.Despite improvements since Russia’s attack on the 2016 presidential race, the U.S. elections infrastructure is vulnerable — and will remain so in November.Cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier laid out the problem to an overflowing room full of election directors and secretaries of state — people charged with running and securing elections — at a conference at Harvard University this spring.“Computers are basically insecure,” said Schneier. “Voting systems are not magical in any way. They are computers.” The needs are not equal“Some states are much better off when it comes to protecting their elections systems. And remember, the Russians in particular don’t have to attack every state, they’ll go to the weakest link,” said Eric Rosenbach, director of the Belfer Center leading the security exercises, to the Senate Homeland Security Committee. “All they have to do is undermine trust in the system and confidence in the outcome.”But these issues are bigger than the security of the machines that voters use.(Interactive: How secure is your vote?)“The focus regarding the new election security funding seems to be disproportionately focused only on paper ballots and audits. Those are very important, but it will also be nearly impossible to implement these changes prior to 2018,” said David Becker, the executive director of the Center for Election Innovation and Research.He continued: “Meanwhile, other areas of security – voter registration database security (the one area where we know there was one breach in 2016), staff training (proper login protocols, spear-phishing education, etc.), hiring of skilled technical staff – are all just as important and could be done immediately.”There are questions about whether a subsequent attack might target systems at that level: rather than trying to change individual votes, a cyber-adversary might try to erase or change all the registration documents in a particular place on Election Day, just to cause chaos. House Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, has warned about the danger of this kind of “cyber-bomb”.Election officials in the more than 10,000 voting jurisdictions are tasked with tackling it all, with differing resources at their disposable. Harvard’s Belfer Center released a playbook for actionable, and often cheap, cyber security tips.And March’s exercises were framed as “train the trainer” workshops, with the hope that the election directors present would then go back to their respective states and localities and run similar drills.Experts often talk about the simple human element of cyber security — being able to spot a phishing email, or choosing a strong password. After all, many voting jurisdictions have small IT departments who may also be responsible for running other city and town infrastructure — they aren’t resourced to defend against an attack by a nation-state.“It’s going to be a real culture shift, it’s going to have to be something we repeat over and over again until it becomes ingrained in our every day activity,” said Jennifer Morrell, the Deputy of Elections and Recording for Arapahoe County, Co.“Most of the conversations around this have been your state and local directors and now we’ve got to filter that down – it’s going to take a little while.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Even though most states have moved away from voting equipment that does not produce a paper trail, when experts talk about “voting systems,” that phrase encompasses the entire process of voting: how citizens register to vote, how they find their polling places, how they check in, how they cast their ballots, and ultimately how they find out who won.Much of that process is digital.“This is the problem we always have in computer security — basically nobody has ever built a secure computer. That’s the reality,” Schneier said. “I want to build a robust system that is secure despite the fact that computers have vulnerabilities, rather than pretend that they don’t because no one has found them yet. And people will find them — whether it’s nation states or teenagers on a weekend.”Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who sits on the Senate intelligence committee looking into Russia’s attack on the 2016 election, warned elections officials in his state not to be complacent.“I cannot emphasize enough the vulnerability,” Rubio said, according to the Tampa Bay Times. “I don’t think [election officials] fully understand the nature of the threat.”Talking in public about these dangers is a tough balancing act. Transparency in elections is a key component to a working democracy — but election officials want citizens to vote, so they have to portray confidence in the system.There remains no evidence, as lawmakers and election heads often point out, that any votes were actually changed in the 2016 election.But the Department of Homeland Security says Russian hackers did break into the registration system in one state, Illinois, and steal the username and password of an election official in another, Arizona — and targeted or probed the voting systems of at least 21 states.So in the span of just two years, officials have gone from arguing their systems are completely secure, to talking openly and clearly about the specific issues that exist and working to fix them.But a lack of time and resources means heading into the 2018 midterms, American voting systems remain vulnerable, and as Rubio noted, there’s no synchronicity among states and jurisdiction about where the country is in terms of security. 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first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA motorist caught racing along the A50 between Stoke-on-Trent and Uttoxeter can expect a summons to drop on their doormat after being clocked by traffic cops. The Staffordshire Police Road Policing Unit (RPU) – formerly Tactical Support Team – revealed they had been conducting a speed enforcement session on the busy road. Officers did not reveal how many people were clocked speeding on the A50 yesterday. A Staffs Police RPU spokesman said: “We know there is a problem with drivers speeding on the A50 between Stoke & Uttoxeter, that’s why we carry out speed enforcement! “We had a driver at 107mph in a 70 mph zone. Court appearance pending.” Speeding is widely regarded to be one of the ‘fatal four’ – the main causes of road deaths across the United Kingdom – along with using a mobile phone while driving, not wearing a seatbelt and drink-driving. Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Police search for missing woman Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Follow StokeonTrentLive Download our app  – You can download our free app for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store , or get the Android version from Google Play .  Follow StokeonTrentLive on Facebook –   Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments. Click here to give it a like! Follow us on Twitter –   For breaking news and the latest stories,  click here to follow SOTLive on Twitter . Follow us on Instagram – Featuring pictures past and present from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page! We also put the latest news in our Instagram Stories.  Click here to follow StokeonTrentLive on Instagram .center_img Punter found hiding in bushes Driver named following fatal collisionlast_img read more