first_imgThe Act reads: “To prohibit strikes by certain public employees; to provide review from disciplinary action with respect thereto; to provide for the mediation of grievances and the holding of elections; to declare and protect the rights and privileges of public employees; to require certain provisions in collective bargaining agreements; to prescribe means of enforcement and penalties for the violation of the provisions of this act; and to make appropriations.” Official election results will come to City Council for certification on March 26. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享City of Seward voters have approved a employee relations measure in the unofficial results from Tuesday’s special election. If adopted, Public Employment Relations Act would oversee the organization of public employees in the City of Seward instead of the city council. In the unofficial results released on March 19; 129 voters were in favor, 107 were opposed.center_img In addition to the votes cast on election day, there are 47 absentee in person ballots and 5 questioned ballots to be counted by the Canvass Board on Thursday, March 21, at 1:00 p.m. in Council Chambers. All public is invited to attend. The question put before the voters was: Currently, the Public Employment Relations Act (“the Act”) does not apply to City of Seward employees.  Voting “yes” would repeal the ordinance which exempts the City from the Act.   So a “yes” vote would mean that the Act would apply to City Employees, and a “no” vote would keep the current situation. Seward long ago opted out of the Public Employment Relations Act, which meant the Seward City Council had control over the city’s labor policy, which includes employee organizing activity.last_img read more

first_imgGoogle announced a program to help people discard of opioids. Getty Google says it wants to give people information to help them beat opioid addictions. The search giant on Thursday said it will begin listing places on Google Maps where people can discard unused medications. Those places include pharmacies, hospitals and government buildings. The app will locate drug disposal centers. Google If you type in queries like “drug drop-off near me” or “medication disposal near me,” Google Maps will display local places that have drug disposal services year-round. In all, there are 35,000 locations on the app, with a focus on seven states: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan and Pennsylvania. For the project, Google partnered with those state governments, as well as the Drug Enforcement Agency, Health and Human Services, and retail pharmacies Walgreens and CVS. Google said it eventually wants to expand the program beyond those seven states. The search giant said the data from the new Maps feature won’t be used to go after people for illegal drug possession. The company said the data from the DEA and other partners will only be used to show people drop-off locations. The disposals are confidential and no-questions-asked, Google said. The news comes as health professionals and government officials try to figure out how to deal with the opioid epidemic. More than 130 people die each day in the US from opioid overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meanwhile, the tech industry has been under intense scrutiny over the positive and negative effects its products could have on society. Google has been criticized for its policing of disinformation, data collection practices and abuse on its platforms. Lawmakers have also called upon tech giants to help contain the opioid problem. After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg traveled across the US in 2017 on a “listening tour” to get out of his Silicon Valley bubble, he said one of his biggest takeaways was the severity of the opioid crisis. At a hearing before the House of Representatives last April, David McKinley, a Republican from West Virginia, grilled Zuckerberg on why illegal opioid listings weren’t removed from Facebook. “There are number of areas of content that we need to do a better job,” Zuckerberg replied. In June, the social network said searches for opioids would be redirected to a federal crisis help line.  Tags 0 Tech Industry Google Alphabet Inc. Post a comment Share your voicelast_img read more