first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Crystal Palace chairman Parish: These kids set to follow Wan-Bissaka…by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace chairman Steve Parish is delighted with the progress of their young players.Parish expects more to follow Aaron Wan-Bissaka into manager Roy Hodgson’s first team.He told the club’s website, “…our U23s and U18s both won their respective leagues, which were brilliant achievements for our Academy. “Aaron’s progress through the ranks has been something to celebrate, but he’s not the only one to force his way into Roy’s plans. Sam Woods and Ryan Innis made their first team debuts, whilst James Daly, Nya Kirby and Giovanni McGregor have made the first team bench this year. It is an exciting time to be a young player in our Academy.” last_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Chelsea smash seven past Grimsby as debutante James shinesby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea demolished Grimsby Town by seven goals to one to secure their place on the Carabao Cup fourth-round on Wednesday.Teenager Reece James was excellent on debut, scoring and setting up two goals.Michy Batshuayi also took advantage of his first start of the season by scoring a brace.Ross Barkley, Pedro and Kurt Zouma also got on the scoresheet.Callum Hudson-Odoi rounded off the win in his first appearance since going down with an Achilles injury in April. last_img read more

first_img Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says that tourism has the potential to accelerate growth and reduce poverty in countries across the globe. Story Highlights “It can also help to promote social inclusiveness, employment and poverty reduction, resource efficiency, environmental protection and climate change, cultural values, diversity and heritage, mutual understanding, peace and security,” he added, while participating in a World Tourism Think Tank in Costa Navarino, Greece, recently. Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says that tourism has the potential to accelerate growth and reduce poverty in countries across the globe.“An expanded tourism sector with a high degree of economic integration can produce positive and spillover effects that can help to promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth,” he said.“It can also help to promote social inclusiveness, employment and poverty reduction, resource efficiency, environmental protection and climate change, cultural values, diversity and heritage, mutual understanding, peace and security,” he added, while participating in a World Tourism Think Tank in Costa Navarino, Greece, recently.Minister Bartlett pointed out that tourism remains one of Jamaica’s few labour-intensive sectors, directly employing over 106,000 persons, while generating indirect jobs for another 250,000 individuals in linked sectors such as agriculture, the creative and cultural industries, entertainment, manufacturing, transportation, finance and insurance, electricity and water, construction and other services.“Direct contribution of tourism to our gross domestic product (GDP) is estimated at 8.4 per cent, while total contribution is estimated at a 27.2 per cent of GDP. Tourism is also the single most important generator of foreign exchange for the Jamaican economy,” he noted.Mr. Bartlett pointed out that the tourism industry in many developing and least developed countries (LDCs) has become the most viable and sustainable option for economic development, and in some countries the main source of foreign exchange earnings.According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) in 2014, LDCs received US$16.4 billion in exports from international tourism, up from US$2.6 billion in 2000, making the sector an important pillar of their economies and helping some to graduate from the LDC status.Tourism is also labour-intensive and supports a diverse and versatile labour market.Minister Bartlett argued that development and execution of sustainable growth strategies must incorporate broad-based input from a wide range of stakeholders in order to build consensus.He noted that visionary leaders in Government, industry and civil society must collaborate in order to create the needed infrastructures to overcome growth and competitiveness barriers.“We have to be strategic and smart in our approach. The global tourism pie is huge. It has maintained a level of profitability and dependability like no other industry and has been the main breadwinner for many countries. We must continue to build on our collective resources and be cognisant at all times that through partnerships and collaborations; we can all succeed in realising our dreams,” he added. “Direct contribution of tourism to our gross domestic product (GDP) is estimated at 8.4 per cent, while total contribution is estimated at a 27.2 per cent of GDP. Tourism is also the single most important generator of foreign exchange for the Jamaican economy,” he noted. last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA — When she was 17 years old, Liz was coerced by a Children’s Aid worker into having an abortion and being sterilized at a northwestern Ontario hospital, she says — an experience she’s carried for 40 years.“It was a matter of me almost (being) cornered, if you will, by my worker at the time saying, ‘You better have an abortion because if you don’t, either way, we are going to take that child from you’,” Liz says.New research shows the forced sterilization of Indigenous women is not just a shameful part of Canadian history. Reports from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and the territories suggest it is still happening.Tubal ligations carried out on unwilling Indigenous women is one of the “most heinous” practices in health care happening across Canada, says Yvonne Boyer, a Metis lawyer and former nurse who is now a senator for Ontario.She was first contacted by Liz (who asked not to have her last name published, so she could talk freely about something so personal) in 2017 after a news story detailed research Boyer produced with Metis physician and researcher Dr. Judith Bartlett. Their report detailed how Indigenous women were coerced into tubal ligations — the severing, burning or tying of the Fallopian tubes that carry eggs from the ovaries to the uterus — after childbirth in the Saskatoon Health Region.Boyer now wants the Senate to study the scope of the issue nationally, making it the focus of her first address to the upper chamber.“If it’s happened in Saskatoon, it has happened in Regina, it’s happened in Winnipeg, it’s happened where there’s a high population of Indigenous women,” Boyer says in an interview. “I’ve had many women contact me from across the country and ask me for help.”Some Indigenous women interviewed for the report also felt pushed into signing consent forms for the procedures while they were in active labour or on operating tables, Boyer says, noting a class-action lawsuit against the Saskatoon Health Region was launched in 2017 by two of the affected women.Each claimed $7 million in damages. Now about 60 women are part of the lawsuit, she adds.“If there are 60 women just in the Saskatoon area, there are many more that haven’t come forward in that area and there are many more that wanted to come forward but were too traumatized to,” Boyer says. “There’s many more that have buried those memories.”Alisa Lombard, an associate with Maurice Law — a firm leading the proposed class action — says women from outside Saskatoon Health Region have also reported being sterilized without proper and informed consent. She says she’s heard from others in Saskatchewan as well as Manitoba, Ontario and Alberta.Records and research show the practice was prevalent in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut as well, she adds.Lombard says her firm will raise the issue of coerced sterilizations of Indigenous women at the UN Committee Against Torture this month.In its submission to the committee, Lombard’s firm calls out provincial and federal authorities for not investigating and punishing those responsible for the practice despite having received “numerous reports of numerous cases of forced sterilization.”It also outlines specific steps to combat the practice, including criminalizing forced sterilization through the Criminal Code and having Health Canada issue guidance to health professionals regarding sterilization procedures.“I think any and all attention brought to such egregious human-rights breaches is not only necessary, but it ought to be expected,” Lombard says. “I think upon any kind of inkling that something this terrible is happening, that it is reported and the fact it is reported by so many women … I think our governments have an obligation to look into it deeply and to fix it, mostly importantly.”Canada must ensure the practice stops, says Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott, with policies, education and awareness-raising.“The issue of forced sterilization of vulnerable people, including Indigenous women, is a very serious violation of human rights,” she says, noting it has gone on in Canada for a long time.She also calls what happened to Liz “absolutely appalling and reprehensible.”“The story that you’re telling where not only was apprehension being threatened … that she was forced into not only giving up the baby she was carrying but give up her future unborn children, is frankly a horrifying concept,” Philpott says.Liz remains haunted by what has stolen from her. Sometimes she hears her baby in her sleep.“I’ve had a few dreams … where you could hear a baby crying or you could have a sense of a baby,” she says. “The first time I had it I didn’t know if it was a boy or a girl. And then another time I had it, it was a boy.”She says it took years before she understood that what happened wasn’t her fault.“You say to yourself, ‘I deserve this, this is my sacrifice, this is my cross to bear’.”—Follow @kkirkup on TwitterKristy Kirkup, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgJerusalem: Israel’s prime minister is portraying an Arab lawmaker, Ahmad Tibi, as a threat to national security in a campaign that critics say questions the loyalty of the country’s Arab citizens ahead of April elections. Benjamin Netanyahu has been slumping in the polls after the announcement of his pending corruption indictment. The prime minister has been repeating a campaign mantra, using his own nickname: “Bibi or Tibi.” The slogan highlights Netanyahu’s efforts to paint his challengers as conspiring with Arab Israelis and a hostile media to oust him. Tibi says he is concerned about what he views as Netanyahu’s attempt to demonize Israel’s Arab minority. Arabs make up about 20 per cent of Israel’s 9 million residents. They hold full citizenship rights but have faced decades of discrimination.last_img read more

first_imgWashington: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the recent arrest of a woman who allegedly breached security at President Donald Trump’s private Florida club while carrying Chinese passports and a flash drive containing malware, is an example of the threat Beijing poses to Washington. In a TV interview on Friday, Pompeo declined to provide additional details related to his claim but said: “I think this tells the American people the threat that China poses, the efforts they’re making inside the US, not only against government officials but more broadly.” CNN reported on Wednesday that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun investigating the possibility that the incident at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property was an espionage effort. The US official who confirmed the espionage probe said the FBI is doing what it has to do in these circumstances, when there is a foreign national involved and a possibility of counterintelligence or cyber-security issues. Earlier this week, Trump dismissed concerns about the incident when asked about potential Chinese espionage. Hedescribed it a “fluke situation,” praising both the Secret Service and the receptionist who stopped the accused, Yujing Zhang. Zhang was charged with making false statements to a federal officer and entering a restricted area on Monday. A detention hearing is scheduled for April 8 and arraignment for April 15. While investigators have not yet revealed conclusive evidence suggesting a link to Chinese espionage, the breach has highlighted long-brewing concerns about security at Mar-a-Lago. The club allows members, their guests and people attending events to enter and move around, even as Trump makes frequent visits to the property.last_img read more