first_imgStreaming music service grew by 1.1 million paid subscriptions last year in BritainPhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Oct 31, 2017 – 12:34 pm In the big leagues for music streaming services, Spotify financials are scrutinized, including by potential investors. In the first half of 2017, overall, growing revenues and shrinking losses were not good enough to satisfy everyone. But in Britain, things are more cheery as growth is accompanied by profitability.Over the course of 2016, paid subscriptions swelled from 1.7 million to 2.8 million users — a growth of 1.1 million Brits paying monthly from Spotify’s 7.1 million active U.K. visitors. Although year-end profits only amounted to a few million dollars, they grew as did payments to rights holders. That is the win-win combination both Spotify and investors would like to see across its global operations.Last year’s U.K. growth came in part from the platform’s global family plan as well as successful marketing campaigns targeting holidays and summer. In dollars, overall 2016 U.K. revenue grew from $247 million to $312 million mostly thanks to paid subscriptions. Since the music side of its business gives a substantial cut to rights holders, Spotify also looks forward to revenue growth from the advertising side of its business. British ad sales grew last year from $14 million to $23 million, a smaller but more lucrative bottom line, because it doesn’t require paying for music rights.Spotify Reveals Emerging Artists Program Twitter Email Spotify Closed 2016 In UK With 2.8 Mil Paying Subscribers Growth And Profit In The UK For Spotify spotify-closed-2016-uk-28-mil-paying-subscribers Facebook News last_img read more

first_img You, an astronomer: Look at this majestic black hole!Me, a birder: oh. oh no pic.twitter.com/yZT97JKFZO— Rosemary Mosco (@RosemaryMosco) April 10, 2019 Online Sci-Tech Cosmic dead ringers: 27 super strange-looking space objects 0 #BlackHole Katamari sun pic.twitter.com/YZqFRIT6wN— marisa losciale (@marisalosc) April 10, 2019 First-ever photo of a Black Hole (2019)Captured by Event Horizon Telescope.TWIN PEAKS. Part 8. “Gotta Light?” (2017)Directed by David Lynch.#EHTBlackHole #M87 #NASA #TwinPeaks pic.twitter.com/YO48WPQi3y— Black Lodge Cult (@BlackLCult) April 10, 2019 Now playing: Watch this: used Photoshop’s shake reduction filter on the Black Hole photo and was amazed by the result#EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/RLBPyuIx3T— Paul Scott Canavan (@abigbat) April 10, 2019 How black holes swallow light, warp space-time and blow… But the black hole is giving us more than just the evil eye. It also resembles certain breakfast foods. Artist Paul Scott Canavan says he used Photoshop’s shake reduction filter to clarify the picture. What he got was a cosmic doughnut. This photo of the black hole is awesome, but wait… Enhance! Hmm, enhance! One more time, enhance! Whoa. The biggest Cinnamon Raisin Bagel in the world, and it’s still hot! #EHT #EventHorizonTelescope pic.twitter.com/aPDVtLHF2u— Gabor Heja (@gheja_) April 10, 2019 Space So, here’s the first photo ever taken of a black hole. And also here’s the album cover for Soundgarden “Superunknown”, which contained the song “Black Hole Sun” 🤯#EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/m7zUQYIUmR— José Morales-González (@josemorgo) April 10, 2019 Share your voice Twin Peaks fans found a parallel image in director David Lynch’s return series. I see Disney’s remake of THE BLACK HOLE has finally escaped development hell. pic.twitter.com/YZMlGFqCUT— Phillip Bastien (@PABastien) April 10, 2019 Science cartoonist and author Rosemary Mosco is a birder. She sees a bird’s eye. 6:32 Enlarge ImageOn April 10, Event Horizon Telescope researchers unveiled the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.  National Science Foundation Behold the majesty of science. We’ve just seen the first ever image of a black hole. Now let’s make silly jokes about it.The Event Horizon Telescope project, which consists of an international network of radio telescopes, revealed a mind-blowing glimpse of an actual black hole on Wednesday. It looks like a fuzzy lopsided circle with a gradation of red, orange, yellow and white colors with a dark center.    The black hole picture is shaping up to be a Rorschach test. What you see will depend on your hobbies and interests, and just how hungry you are when you’re looking at it. Originally published April 10, 8:48 a.m. PT. Update, 2:23 p.m. PT: Added Google’s black hole doodle.   System administrator Gabor Heja went in a less sugary direction and discovered the black hole is actually the biggest cinnamon raisin bagel in the world, and it’s still hot. Google couldn’t resist getting in on the fun. It launched a Google Doodle featuring an animation of the black hole sucking down the Google letters.googledoodleblackholeEnlarge ImageGoogle unveiled an animation of the black hole in action. Google screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET Children of the ’90s now all have the 1994 Soundgarden hit Black Hole Sun stuck in their heads. Twitter user José Morales-González noticed a certain likeness between the Event Horizon image and the cover for Soundgarden’s Superunknown album. Rumors of a reboot of Disney’s 1979 sci-fi flick The Black Hole are getting a fresh look. “I see Disney’s remake of The Black Hole has finally escaped development hell,” tweeted screenwriter Phillip Bastien. Firefox communication design lead Sean Martell noticed a very familiar logo lurking in the black hole’s bright circle. 27 Photos Tags So NASA finally let us see what a #BlackHole looks like and it was the Eye of Sauron this whole time. pic.twitter.com/0QYJtsi20j— Andrew Athias (@AndrewAthias) April 10, 2019 Post a comment If you’ve ever played the Katamari Damacy games, you’ll appreciate this joke: At first glance, every hobbit-loving Lord of the Rings fan noticed the black hole’s resemblance to the Eye of Sauron. They’ve found our origins, @Firefox. #EHTBlackHole pic.twitter.com/3k0IqjNXsZ— mart3ll+ (@mart3ll) April 10, 2019last_img read more

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Google just laid out a timeline to get rid of Adobe Flash from its display advertising services.From January 2, 2017 ads in the Flash format will not run on across Google Display Network and DoubleClick. Flash will be phased out as early as June 30, 2016, from which time it will not be possible to upload display ads built in the format.Adobe Flash is a piece of software used to create audio and video animations, games, and applications. Until recently, up to 90% of rich media ads on desktop use Flash, according to Sizmek.Google is one of the biggest display advertising players online. Its display advertising revenue in 2015 reached $3.52 billion, which makes up 13% of its total ad revenue. In the US, it is second only to Facebook when it comes to the share of display advertising spend, according to eMarketer.But Google has been moving towards switching out Adobe Flash for HTML5 — a “type of code that describes web pages” — for display ads in recent years. Last September, for example,Google’s Chrome browser began blocking Adobe Flash ads.Flash has been criticized by developers for its “critical vulnerabilities” which have made it bug-ridden, the Verge reported. However Adobe did release an update to fix these bugs.Aside from Google, Firefox has also blocked Flash over security concernsfollowing several instances of vulnerabilities in the software being compromised by hackers. Amazon has also banned Flash ads from appearing on its platform, and Apple has never supported Flash on the iPhone.Adobe itself seems prepared for the end of Flash. It killed off Flash Professional (the tool for making Flash animations) in December, ArsTechnica reported. The new Adobe Animate CC program allows users to develop HTML5 content. However it is still possible to create Flash files in the software, so the format is by no means dead yet.In a symbolically significant move, Adobe killed its Flash Twitter account on Monday: This account is no longer active. For all things Flash related, follow @AnimateCC!— Adobe Flash Platform (@AdobeFlash) February 9, 2016     This story originally appeared on Business Insider February 10, 2016 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more