first_imgRick John, Principal Broker/Owner, R. JOHN & CO. Real Estate announced that Suzanne King has joined the firm as a REALTOR Associate and will concentrate on residential properties in Windham County, VT and later plans to get her NH license as well.Suzanne has been in the mental health field for many years and most recently was Community Director with the March of Dimes in Brattleboro, Bellows Falls & Springfield Area. Suzanne lives in Vernon VT with her husband and two children. Rick John also has been hired as an instructor with Around VT & NH, a real estate education company in MT Holly, VT and is teaching the pre-licensing course in SVT & SNH.John is currently serving as President –elect of VREIN in Williston,VT. VREIN is the organization that operates the MLS function for most of the REALTORS in VT. Mr. John has been a Director at VREIN for the past two years.last_img read more

first_imgEverton boss Roberto Martinez insists his players are not “too nice” – but has stressed they need to wise up to opponents “trying to take advantage” with certain tactics. “It was a frustrating moment for me,” Martinez, quoted by the Liverpool Echo, said. “It’s not that we’re too nice, it’s that we’re a fair team. It’s important for us, though, to identity when people are playing with that and trying to take advantage. “We just need to make sure it doesn’t cost us. I don’t care about us using it but we need to know how not to get disadvantaged by it. “I’ll never compromise what we represent in terms of winning games. But if you have a player that wants to lay on the pitch and moan to the referee we shouldn’t stop the game. Mikel used that to his advantage and we need to be aware of that. “We should punish that sort of reaction and behaviour with penetrating football and using the players we have on the pitch. It’s a lesson to be learned. But it’s a learning curve.” The Spaniard was frustrated by an incident in Saturday’s 4-1 FA Cup quarter-final defeat at Arsenal which saw the Toffees, with Gunners midfielder Mikel Arteta on the turf claiming he was injured following a tackle from Seamus Coleman, opt to kick the ball out even though referee Mark Clattenburg had allowed play to continue. Martinez does not want his “fair” team emulating the antics of Arteta, who appeared to be unhurt, but is keen for them to learn from the episode. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

first_img Published on March 25, 2010 at 12:00 pm Comments When Bob Huggins rumbles into the locker room the way he did with his West Virginia team down by two at halftime Thursday night, the Mountaineer players know better than to speak. Or even make eye contact with their head coach. Star forward Kevin Jones says the best way to handle the situation is to sit quietly and stare at the ground.Jones admits the tirade was justified this time. The Mountaineers had an uncharacteristically sloppy first half and played directly into their opponent’s strengths. Against a team like Washington, which relies on its transition game to generate offense, 13 turnovers represents a ticket back to Morgantown, W. Va., a bit prematurely. And then, when the halftime clock hit the five-minute mark, Huggins suddenly relaxed. His voice quieted. The storm passed. The realization struck that despite 13 first-half turnovers, West Virginia trailed by just one possession. This was the message Huggins delivered before sending his players back onto the court. And as they have virtually all season, his players responded.The second-seeded Mountaineers outscored the 11th-seeded Huskies by 15 in the second half, en route to a 69-56 victory in the Sweet 16 at the Carrier Dome. WVU (30-6) advances to the Elite Eight for the first time since 2005, where it will face Kentucky on Saturday night. Washington (26-10), meanwhile, falls to 0-4 in the round of 16 since the NCAA Tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985.‘We knew we just couldn’t play any worse than we did in the first half, and that is what made us feel like we were going to be fine,’ said Jones, who led all scorers with 18 points on 7-of-12 shooting. ‘We knew if we just played our game the rest of the way, we couldn’t lose.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWest Virginia compensated for its carelessness by dominating the glass. The Mountaineers out-rebounded their opponents, 49-29, including 23 offensive boards. The undersized and overmatched Huskies had no answer for WVU’s depth and strength underneath. Jones called his team’s rebounding advantage ‘the great equalizer,’ counteracting its early turnovers.In the days leading up to the game, the Mountaineers focused on containing Washington’s flashy and speedy transition game. The Huskies’ ability to create easy baskets on the fast break had propelled them to a nine-game winning streak, including a run through the Pac-10 Conference tournament and two victories in the NCAAs.Despite making it a point of emphasis, West Virginia still struggled to get back on defense in the first half. Washington scored 10 points off the fast break and 12 off turnovers. WVU had grabbed only seven offensive boards. ‘First half, they got us really playing fast-paced, their way of playing basketball,’ Jones said. ‘The second half we kind of slowed down and got into our offense.’During his halftime tirade, Huggins told his team to worry less about trying to stop Washington and concern itself with doing what it does best — run a methodical half-court offense and rebound.From that moment on, it was an entirely different game. The pace slowed down dramatically. West Virginia milked the shot clock and created consistent open looks at the basket. The Mountaineers went on an 8-0 run midway through the second half to open a nine-point lead and never looked back.‘I think we showed them so much tape of how fast Washington is in transition and the need to get back that I think we were thinking about getting back rather than doing what we do,’ Huggins said. ‘… I said, ‘Maybe we’re going to lose, I don’t know. But if we do lose, let’s lose our way. Let’s lose doing what we do.”With its transition game stifled, Washington quickly began to struggle. The Huskies had relied on West Virginia’s turnovers and missed shots to create layups on the other end. With WVU controlling the glass and scoring nearly every possession, running became a near impossibility.Washington looked confused and listless in its half-court set most of the game. It didn’t help that the Huskies’ star player, senior forward Quincy Pondexter, got into early foul trouble and scored just seven points in the game. Small forward Justin Holiday led the way with 14.‘We gave them some open looks at the beginning of that second half,’ Washington head coach Lorenzo Romar said. ‘The first half we didn’t give them very many open looks. They also began to attack the glass.’The West Virginia players didn’t celebrate in the locker room after the game. They hadn’t played well enough to deserve that luxury. The players realize that they probably won’t be able to recover from a slow first half moving forward in this Tournament.But on Thursday, Huggins came to the rescue in time. And though nobody would share exactly what Huggins said, forward Wellington Smith was willing to provide the gist of it.‘He said we have to start playing like college basketball players,’ Smith said, as a grin crept across his face. ‘We had to stop playing like 5-year-olds and start playing like college basketball players.’jediamon@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

first_imgIt was the final press conference before Claressa Shields faces Ivana Habazin for the vacant WBC and WBO junior middleweight titles Friday night, and the latter took the podium with an amendment to make.“Claressa Shields is not the greatest woman of all time,” Habazin said Tuesday, referring to Shields’ self-proclaimed “GWOAT” nickname. “But she is the greatest bully of all time.” Shields, seated just a few inches to her right, gave the remark a thumbs down.Join DAZN and watch more than 100 fight nights a yearHours later, she sat in Sporting News’ office in Lower Manhattan and was further irked by Habazin’s assertion.“I don’t bully nobody,” Shields told SN. “I don’t even know why she said that. I haven’t had any interaction with her since the fight got cancelled in Flint.”The fight in Michigan was supposed to happen last Oct. 5, but it was canceled at the weigh-in when Habazin’s trainer, James Ali Bashir, 68, was attacked and hospitalized with head and facial injuries. Shields’ brother, Artis Mack, was charged with one count of assault in connection with the altercation. Following the ugly incident, Shields has publicly offered statements not condoning the attack.A little over a month later, the fight was rescheduled for Friday, Jan. 10 at the Ocean Casino Resort in Atlantic City, N.J. From that point until now, Shields hasn’t appreciated Habazin’s insinuation that Shields herself was involved in the assault nor the Croatian fighter’s remarks about her family.“After I made a statement, I think a day later she made her statement, and her statement was she called me a thug and said my family was thugs and that I need my thugs to protect me,” Shields said. “I just blocked her on all social media because I don’t take stuff like that lightly.”Habazin has claimed that the “thug” remark was for Shields’ brother and not Shields, but other comments from the former welterweight champion piqued “T-Rex” in all the wrong ways.“She’s just using the situation that happened in Flint to build her own career and to build herself up,” Shields said. “Yeah, you can care about your coach and use him for motivation, but for her to keep saying that — oh, now she’s saying I’m a bully, at first I’m a thug and then I’m stupid, I don’t know how to read and all this crazy stuff, she is embarrassing herself.“Whether we have bad blood or not,” Shields added, “I’m still going to kick her ass.”On Wednesday morning, Shields upped the ante by promising to channel WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder’s knockout artistry on Friday night.Bringing all my @BronzeBomber Vibes this Friday. Gonna sleep this weak ass girl 😈💪🏾— ClaressaT-rexShields (@Claressashields) January 8, 2020Despite what Shields deems as attacks on her character, she says this fight is more about making history. Or “herstory” as she calls it.Shields already stands as the only American boxer to win back-to-back Olympic gold medals. A win Friday, and the 24-year-old would reign as a three-division world champ faster than any boxer — male or female — in history, beating out Vasiliy Lomachenko, who accomplished the feat in 11 fights.“It would mean a lot to become the fastest boxer to claim three divisions,” said Shields (9-0, 2 KOs). “It’d mean a lot because women can fight, women can box, and the fact that I’ve taken the same challenges that Lomachenko has taken and I’ve done it faster, I feel like it puts me … if they ever talk about this, he’ll always be second on the list.“It’s about a woman being first ahead of the men.”That’s not to say that Shields isn’t already. When asked where she thinks she falls on the pound-for-pound list, Shields said “Top 10” without any hesitation. As she sat and pondered it a bit more, Shields only bolstered her case for a higher standing.“I don’t know if you want to put me at No. 10 because it makes men comfortable, or I don’t know if you want to put me at No. 5 or No. 6,” Shields commented, “but I know that I got a lot of skills and I can do everything inside the ring.”Shields says that skill set includes being able to box like Muhammad Ali, throw combinations like “Sugar” Ray Leonard, offer great head movement like Lomachenko — all equipped with the defense of Floyd Mayweather Jr.That’s why she feels she’s at least Top 10.“(The list) got some men who are on people’s top 10 who don’t have better skills than me,” Shields added for good measure.✅ Box around like @MuhammadAli✅ Thow combinations like @SugarRayLeonard✅ Hand movement like @VasylLomachenko✅ Defense like @FloydMayweatherJust a few reasons why @Claressashields believes she is a Top 10 pound-for-pound fighter regardless of how men feel about it. pic.twitter.com/zVgDCwltJL— Sporting News Fights (@sn_fights) January 8, 2020Following this bout against Habazin, Shields intends to have a small training camp with UFC light heavyweight champion Jon Jones. Shields hopes the GWOAT-GOAT meeting lays the groundwork for eventually training herself up in MMA and clashing with UFC women’s double champ Amanda Nunes in the octagon someday.For Shields, it’s all a part of her New Year’s resolution of refusing to compromise — both professionally and personally — so that she could keep her laser-like vision 20/20.Despite becoming the undisputed middleweight champion in 2019 — just the second women ever to be crowned with that glory — Shields says she wasn’t her happiest last year.“I do a lot for my family and friends, and I do a lot of compromising just because of their feelings,” Shields said. “I’m not worried about my feelings. I’m worried about everybody else.“From me doing that, it kind of made me unhappy,” she continued about her 2019 mood. “I didn’t travel to where I wanted to travel to, I didn’t do stuff I wanted to do just because I was looking out for other people, or listening to other people or trying to make everyone else comfortable.”Entering 2020, Shields made a conscious decision to change that. “It’s like my life is about making me comfortable,” Shields said. “It’s about me being happy. It’s about me feeling like I’m doing what I need to do. And not just having a great boxing life, but a great personal life also.“It all has to kind of mesh together and it wasn’t last year, so I’m cutting that this year,” she said. “Probably every year after that too.”Shields’ fighting herstory should be better off for it, beginning Friday night.last_img read more