first_imgAdam Gilchrist rolled back years to come up with a superlative century helping his team to an impressive 111-run win against Bangalore during the 63rd IPL match on Tuesday. Score | PhotosBatting at the picturesque Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium in Dharamsala on Tuesday, he and countryman Shaun Marsh also put up the highest T20 partnership scoring a massive 206 runs for the second wicket.In the face of a daunting 233-run target, Bangalore lost the plot early.Opener Chris Gayle went back without opening his account to a Ryan Harris ball in the second over and soon one-down batsman Virat Kohli followed in the fourth over. He became Harris’s second victim when the total was 17/2.The other opener Saurabh Tiwary departed on the last ball of the sixth over off Shalabh Srivastava and the next over saw Asad Pathan walk back, caught David Hussey, bowled Paul valthaty when the team total was 43/4.Mohammad Kaif was the next to take a walk. A turner off leggie Piyush Chawla beat him and Gilchrist removed the bails in a jiffy. He was the fifth wicket to fall from the Bangalore camp and the score at the time of his departure was 72.Chawla then came around to get rid of Arun Karthik AB de Villiers to reduce Bangalore to 89/7.With seven wicket back in the dugout, the rest was easy for the Punjab bowlers who quickly wrapped up the tail emerging triumphant by 111 runs with three overs to spare.Punjab inningsPunjab skipper Adam Gilchrist hit a century helping his team 232 against Bangalore – the highest total of IPL-4.advertisementCaptain Gilchrist and Shaun Marsh, who remained unbeaten on 79, scored 206 runs for the second wicket – the highest in T20s so far. Earlier, Punjab captain Adam Gilchrist won the toss and elected to bat in this 63th IPL match of the season.Despite a good start, they lost their opener Paul Valthaty to a Charl Langeveldt ball in the fourth over when the team total was 25.But post that wicket, the two Aussies, Adam Gilchrist and Shaun Marsh got going against the Bangalore bowlers. Soon the run rate shot up to more than 10 an over and by the 10th over the Punjab total was an impressive 99/1.The two started dealing in boundaries and over-the-fence shots making the opposition – Bangalore, table-toppers in the IPL so far, look like a team of novice players. Chris Gayle, who has been impressive both with the bat and the ball this season, too could not much for the team’s cause as the two Aussies went about their business with ease.Punjab crossed the 200-run mark in the 17th over off Johan van der Wath that witnessed as many as 16 runs being scored in it. A much better performance by Van der Wath compared to his last over that went for 30 runs.Gilchrist went on to complete his first IPL-4 century hitting a four off Charl Langeveldt on the second ball of the last over.But the captain’s innings came to a tame end on the penultimate ball of the innings when he prodded an away moving ball to Chris Gayle at short third man. His 106-run innings came off just 55 balls and was decorated with eight four and nine over-the-fence shot.The Gilchrist-Marsh 206-run partnership proved to be the highest in all T20s so far. And the score 232 was the highest of this IPL season. Marsh remained unbeaten on 79.last_img read more

first_imgGrand Final action in the 2007 Senior National Touch League has been fast and furious in sweltering conditions at the BCU Coffs Harbour International Stadium.In the Women’s 40s division Sharkies carried their momentum from a stunning semi-final upset over three time champions Scorpions all the way to NTL glory when they defeated the Tropical North Queensland Cyclones 7-4 in an entertaining grand final on Field one.Sharkies went to the break 2-1 up and the game looked evenly poised at oranges.From the restart former Australian Women’s Open representative Julie Styles scythed through for Cyclones to balance the ledger at 2-2.The two teams traded touchdowns and at 3-3  the game ebbed and flowed with each team searching for the vital chink in the opposition’s armour.Cyclones edged in front 4-3, and looked to be getting on top.Val Harrington evened the game up 4-4 and the championship minutes begun.Sharkies Lisa Miller broke the Cyclones back with back to back touchdowns, engineered by Terri Kronk.Virginia Ingham then sealed the deal for Sharkies with a late touchdown for a 7-4 triumph.Scorers: Sharks 7 – Miller (2), Kronk (1), Pearce (1), Jones (1), Harrington (1) Ingham (1)Cyclones 4 – Desbois (1), Styles (1), Stringini (1), Alison (1)Player of the Final: Heather Desbois (Cyclones)Player of the Series: Terri Kronk (Sharks)The Men’s 50s Grand final resulted in a 3-1 victory to Brisbane Cobras over first time finalists and hometown heroes Northern Eagles.Peter Hawes, Arthur Higgs, and Rob Mc Carthy took the Brisbane boys out to a commanding 3-0 lead before Terry Cohen scored for the Eagles midway through the second half to put the undefeated Cobras on notice that the locals would not go quietly, and at 3-1 the door was slightly ajar.Cobras stiffened their defence again and stood firm to complete a 3-1 victory and claim their first title in this division in NTL history.Scorers:Cobras 3 – Higgs (1), Hawes (1), Mc Carthy (1)Northern Eagles -1 – Cohen (1)Player of the Final: Peter Hawes (Cobras)Player of the Series: Kev Hickey (Cobras)The Men’s 45s title went to local favourites the Northern Eagles with a dour 1-0 victory over Southern Suns.Ian Saunders scored early for the Northern Eagles and the game was end to end as both teams created many opportunities that could not be converted.The Eagles hung on and celebrated their first victory in this division since their hat trick of titles in 1998, 1999, and 2000.Scorers:Northern Eagles – Saunders (1)Southern Suns – (0)The Richard Hamilton Memorial Medal for Player of the Final: Steve Hancock (Eagles)Player of the Series: John Clune (Southern Suns)In the Men’s 40s division the crowd was treated to a feast of flowing football with the star studded Scorpions outfit firing all the early salvos, at one point skipping out to a 5 – 1 lead against a rattled Southern Suns.Led by the Cheung brothers David and Jeff, Brett Gillard, and Australian Men’s 40 Years World Cup Captain Tim Kitchingham, the Scorps boys were looking the goods for their third title on the trot.Dave Elliott and Gary Lawless dragged the Suns back into the contest, but the Suns had given the experienced Scorps combination just too much of a start and despite fighting back to breath respectability back into the scoreline, went down 8-5 as the full time siren sounded.Scorers:Scorpions 8 – Collins (2), Keyes (1), Cheung J (1), Gillard (1), Mc Donald (1), Duguid (1), Stephens (1),Suns 5 –  Elliott (2), Lawless (1), Hearnden (1), Mc Dermott (1)Player of the Final: David Cheung (Scorpions)Player of the Series: Andy Yiangou (Mets)In the Men’s 35s South Queensland Sharks defeated a gallant Scorpions 6-5.The star studded Sharks line up with seven former Australian Open representatives have dominated proceedings all week and were expected to go on with the job today against a Scorpions team that were performing solidly, rather than spectacularly.Dave Roberts had the footy on a string and came out breathing fire for the Scorps. He was the architect of the Scorps attack, playing a hand in all of his team’s touchdowns.Scorps shocked the defending champions getting out to a 5-3 lead until mid way through the second half when the Sharkies got one back to trail by one.The mercurial Dave ‘Rager’ Raper, directing traffic better than Tom Croyden at peak hour in Mount Thomas, then produced a long ball from heaven to put the Sharkies back on level terms at 5-5.With time ticking away, and so many big name champions on the field, something had to give.Two minutes from time, it was appropriate that the biggest name of them all stepped up to the plate to produce the match winner.Scorps were hot on attack, when TFA Hall of Fame member and former Australian Men’s Open Captain Scott “Wommie” Notley instinctively snaffled an intercept off his own line and galloped 70 metres to clinch the title for the Sharks.Scorps had one last throw of the dice through Dave Roberts, but Dave Raper tidied up to send the Shark Tank into raptures with their back to back titles in the Men’s 35s division.Scorers:South Queensland Sharks – 6 – Notley (2), Daniels (1), Hope (1), Willett (1), Cashman (1)Scorpions -5- Martin (2), Leonard (1), Browne (1), Beale (1)Player of the Final : Ian Daniels (Sharks)Player of the Series: Shane Rigby (Sharks)The Women’s 30s Final was an absolute thriller with the Hunter Western Hornets getting home in a drop-off 6-5 over a gallant Rustlers team.Rustlers got out to an early 2-0 lead before Hunter Western Hornets pegged one back just before half time.The game ebbed and flowed and was up for grabs with Hunter Western Hornets getting back to 2-2 before the two sides traded two more touchdowns before regular time expired.Scores were locked at 4-4 at full time.Hornets had first use of the footy and scored through Kellie Johnson after a short side switch play.The Rustlers girls refused to go quietly into the afternoon and Tracey Upton crafted a touchdown for Wendy Evans to keep the drop off and Rustlers title hopes alive.In the ensuing set, Hunter Western Hornet’s Annette Zeman hit a gap through the middle to score her second touchdown for the game and wrap up the region’s first title in this division since 2003.Scorers:Hunter Western Hornets – 6 – Johnson (2), Hampton (2), Zeman (2)Rustlers – 5 – Kelly (2), Evans (2), Keating (1)Player of the Final : Kellie Johnson (Hornets)Player of the Series: Debbie Potts (Hornets)The Men’s 30s Final was a sensationational display of power touch from the Southern Suns who destroyed the Defence Force Warriors 12 -2 in an exceptional display of  controlled rucking and expansive ball play.Australian Open Men’s star Matt Curran led the way, but was well supported by Chris ‘Tarlo’ Tarlinton who bagged a hat trick of touchdowns along with Charles Nye.World Cup representatives Dean Taylor and Ben Smith also stood up to play dominant roles for the Suns.The Suns boys had raced to a 5-0 lead by oranges and went right on with the job in the second stanza.The Suns boys dedicated their victory to Rod Wise, the Suns hard working and dedicated Tour Leader for many years who has announced his retirement from the role.Scorers:Southern Suns – 12 – Tarlinton (3), Nye (3), Curran (1), Carter (1), Giason (1), Smith (1), Monterosso (1), Oyston (1)Defence Force Warriors – 2 – Petrovic (1), Softley (1)Player of the Final: Dean Taylor (Southern Suns)Player of the Series: Matt Curran (Southern Suns)For the results and tables for all divisons go to the TFA SPORTINGPULSE WEBSITElast_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Newcastle defender Fabian Schar warns: We’re not yet safeby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United defender Fabian Schar has warned they’re not yet safe from relegation.Schar has insisted Newcastle still have plenty of room for improvement – despite pulling six points clear of the drop zone following victory at Huddersfield.Speaking after the game Schar said: “At the moment, we have quite good results away.“We have another important week in front of us with a game at home, and it’s another big chance for us.“We are not comfortable with the results at St. James’ Park – we always want to get points there, so we have to try and show the fans what we’ve got and (how) we can play.“We can improve a lot of things.“At the same time, we always have to be focussed and play with our heart.“Even if it is a home game, we have to be able to defend like we do away.” last_img read more

first_imgThe United States has fired the opening shot in the latest softwood-lumber war against Canada, with the Trump administration announcing its first batch of duties on imported wood in the neighbourhood of 20 per cent.The move was expected: the deep-rooted dispute over lumber pricing between the two countries has led to once-a-decade trade skirmishes over the issue, resulting in American duties, then the inevitable court battles, and ultimately negotiated settlements.What wasn’t expected Monday was the enthusiasm with which the new American administration flung itself into the lumber hostilities, touting its incoming countervailing duties as an example of U.S. President Donald Trump’s tough, America-first trade posture.Trump underscored the impending move by announcing it to a gathering of conservative media on the eve of the expected announcement. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross also highlighted it in an interview.Then came a statement that said U.S. Customs will begin collecting cash deposits from Canadian logging companies because they receive a range of subsidies — most of them around 20 per cent.What comes after the countervailing duties is a study of possible anti-dumping duties, followed by a final determination by the U.S. Commerce Department as early as Sept. 7, and one of three possible outcomes: an agreement, a surprise retreat from the U.S. government or potential years-long court battles.It will all play out amid the backdrop of a bigger trade file: the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement.America’s lumber lobby applauded the announcement.“We are pleased with this initial outcome and are looking forward to the (next, anti-dumping) duties expected to be announced June 23,” said Zoltan van Heyningen of the U.S. Lumber Coalition.“Since this is an ongoing matter, we are limiting our comments to our press release.”A late-evening statement from the U.S. administration accused companies of benefiting subsidies ranging from three per cent by J.D. Irving Ltd., to 12.82 per cent for Resolute FP Canada, Ltd., to 20.26 per cent for Canfor Corp., to a high of 24.12 per cent for West Fraser Mills, with most others coming in at 19.88 per cent.Duties will be collected retroactively, too — the U.S. says it will gather them for the previous 90 days. Industry analysts expect the combined duties, Monday’s and the upcoming ones, to range between 30 and 40 per cent.In Canada, pressure will mount on the federal government.The government has adopted an a understated, under-the-radar approach to dealing with Trump. But now as it responds to the U.S. move, it must juggle ongoing softwood negotiations, upcoming NAFTA renegotiations, and a frustrated industry at home.There are already requests for it to provide financial help for Canada’s forestry sector. A government source said conversations are underway, but there won’t be an immediate announcement on that front.The Canadian government will wait to see the details of various punitive measures before calculating the aid amount. It took the federal government more than a year to announce the first of two aid packages after duties were imposed in 2001.It first gave more than $300 million in late 2002 and then $1.5 billion in November 2005, with $900 million for loan insurance to help financially strapped exporters that had more than $5 billion tied up in duties.“(The aid determination) really can’t be made until we’ve seen what the rate and penalty will be,” said an official who declined to be identified because they were not authorized to speak publicly.Quebec Economic Development Minister Dominique Anglade urged Ottawa to help forest companies, but said Monday the province will act immediately: “Day 1, we will be there to support the industry,” she said in an interview.Meanwhile, Ontario named former federal trade minister Jim Peterson as its chief softwood lumber negotiator on Monday. He joins former federal cabinet minister David Emerson who represents B.C. and former U.S. ambassador Raymond Chretien who is Quebec’s negotiator.Unifor president Jerry Dias called on Ottawa to respond to the duties to avoid a repeat of the situation when 15,000 were laid off within months of a combined duty of 27 per cent being imposed in the early 2000s.“It’s hard to exaggerate the impact tariffs will have on hundreds of small communities. The federal government needs to have a plan in place and act swiftly,” he said in a news release.However, provinces aren’t in total agreement about financial support.British Columbia has said it is cautious out of fear that assistance will be construed by the Americans as unfairly helping the Canadian industry. B.C. producers such as West Fraser Timber and Canfor are in a stronger position to weather a U.S. trade battle because they have purchased sawmills in the U.S. and expanded exports to China.In Central Canada, sawmills tend to be smaller, don’t have as much cash flow to pay duties and are therefore more at risk of closing, experts say. That’s why Ontario and Quebec producers have been pushing Ottawa to provide loan guarantees to help them pay duties and stay in business.last_img read more

first_imgPeace River Zone Theatre Festival Flyer. Photo by the Stage North Theatre Society Facebook Page.Friday’s show is Blackbird, which is a heavy drama about two people who had a very unconventional affair when they were young. The Stage North Theatre Society presented this show back on May 10th, which means residents who didn’t get the chance to see this two weeks ago will have a second chance to witness the drama.Saturday’s show is Mary’s Wedding, which takes place the night before Mary’s Wedding in 1920. The play journeys through Mary’s dream, her past, and the moment she meets her first love Charlie before he volunteers for World War One. Charlie’s side of the story takes place in the trenches along side his mentor and sergeant. The play is as much about history as it is about romance.Tickets for the event cost $25 to see all three shows, or $10 for individual shows.Residents can purchased tickets at the North Peace Cultural Centre. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Zone Theatre Festival starts today at the North Peace Cultural Centre.The festival runs until Saturday and will feature a different play each day. Shows starts at 7:30 p.m. and run until 9:30 p.m.Tonights show is “Stop Saying Nothing”, which is a collection about bullying presented by North Peace Secondary School.last_img read more

first_imgMelbourne: Former captain Ricky Ponting feels constant scrutiny on Steve Smith and David Warner following their comeback could be “unsettling” for the Australian team during the World Cup in the United Kingdom. Ponting, who will be part of Australia’s support staff during the mega event, said Smith and Warner will have to be prepared for constant criticism from the UK crowd. Their two-year ban for ball-tampering ends later this month and they will feature in the IPL beginning March 23. Also Read – Dhoni, Paes spotted playing football together”I don’t think it is much of a challenge internally around the players. You’d like to think that those guys are having conversations now, so they’re not leaving it to the last minute and just be exposed to this thing that could be derailing to a team,” Ponting told cricket.com.au. “I’m sure this would have been talked about at a higher level for a long time – how do we integrate them back in? How do they fit in? How is it all going to be seamless? But the hardest part for those guys is going to be the public perception of us, especially in England,” said the two-time World Cup winning captain. Also Read – Andy Murray to make Grand Slam return at Australian OpenConstant attention on Smith and Warner could affect the team during the World Cup, said Ponting. They’re coming back into a World Cup in the UK – they shouldn’t be expecting too many pats on the back over there. They’re going to cop it everywhere they go. They’ve got to know that, they’ve got to accept that and understand that. “The team needs to as well, because that could also be something that could be unsettling for a team.” Australia go into the World Cup as defending champions but this time, they don’t go enter the tournament as outright favourites. Ponting feels things could get a lot easier for Warner and Smith if they are amongst the runs. “I think they are well equipped (to handle the scrutiny), but I think it could be a shock for them by the same token when they come back. They have to expect the absolute worst and then anything better than that is going to be a bonus for them. That would be the way I would approach it if I was them.last_img read more

first_imgWashington: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the recent arrest of a woman who allegedly breached security at President Donald Trump’s private Florida club while carrying Chinese passports and a flash drive containing malware, is an example of the threat Beijing poses to Washington. In a TV interview on Friday, Pompeo declined to provide additional details related to his claim but said: “I think this tells the American people the threat that China poses, the efforts they’re making inside the US, not only against government officials but more broadly.” CNN reported on Wednesday that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun investigating the possibility that the incident at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property was an espionage effort. The US official who confirmed the espionage probe said the FBI is doing what it has to do in these circumstances, when there is a foreign national involved and a possibility of counterintelligence or cyber-security issues. Earlier this week, Trump dismissed concerns about the incident when asked about potential Chinese espionage. Hedescribed it a “fluke situation,” praising both the Secret Service and the receptionist who stopped the accused, Yujing Zhang. Zhang was charged with making false statements to a federal officer and entering a restricted area on Monday. A detention hearing is scheduled for April 8 and arraignment for April 15. While investigators have not yet revealed conclusive evidence suggesting a link to Chinese espionage, the breach has highlighted long-brewing concerns about security at Mar-a-Lago. The club allows members, their guests and people attending events to enter and move around, even as Trump makes frequent visits to the property.last_img read more

first_imgSANAA – A senior operative from al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula movement conceded Sunday that movement fighters had committed mistakes during an early December attack on Yemeni Defense Ministry headquarters that left 52 civilians and military personnel dead and more than 167 others injured.“We did not aim to target civilians at the Defense Ministry complex hospital,” Qassem al-Rimi said. “We shoulder full responsibility for the problems that happened and we are ready to pay compensation for this,” he added in a video on the website of the movement.The December 5 violence erupted after roughly 70 militants stormed the Defense Ministry building and fought with army soldiers inside the ministry. Many of the fatalities involved doctors and medics working in the ministry’s hospital in the compound. Al-Rimi asserted his movement had not instructed its militants to target doctors in the ministry’s hospital.“This attack does not express the ideas of the movement,” al-Rimi said in the video.He said movement leaders had told the attackers to avoid attacking prayer houses and the hospital inside the ministry’s complex, but one of the attackers did not mind this piece of information.“Attacking hospitals had never been an al-Qaeda tactic,” al-Rimi said. “There are many Defense Ministry hospitals in the country, but we never attacked them, although none of them is well guarded,” he added.He said the attack had primarily targeted the Defense Ministry command, which according to him, had turned into an operations room for US drone attacks against Yemenis.last_img read more

first_imgDonald Trump. File PhotoUS president Donald Trump will sign an order recognising Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights when he meets prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Washington on Monday, Israel’s foreign minister said.”President Trump will sign tomorrow in the presence of PM Netanyahu an order recognising Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” Foreign Minister Israel Katz wrote on Twitter on Sunday.Again breaking with longstanding international consensus, Trump said on Thursday that the United States should acknowledge Israeli sovereignty over the strategic plateau it seized from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War.He however left unanswered if or when he would follow through with an order to do so.Netanyahu has long pushed for such recognition, and many analysts saw Trump’s statement, which came in a tweet, as a campaign gift ahead of Israel’s April 9 polls.The prime minister is locked in tough election campaign with a centrist political alliance headed by former military chief Benny Gantz and ex-finance minister Yair Lapid.Syria and other states in the region condemned Trump’s pledge, saying it violates international law. France said the same.Israel annexed the Golan in 1981 in a move never recognised by the international community.The decision is the latest major move in favour of Israel by Trump, who in 2017 recognised the disputed city of Jerusalem as the country’s capital.last_img read more

first_imgBy PHOEBE SUY, Beaumont EnterpriseBEAUMONT, Texas (AP) — From its beginnings in the years after the Civil War, Beaumont’s oldest Black church has witnessed the establishment of the area’s first Black public school, weathered desegregation and this year will celebrate 150 years as a “beacon of light in the community.”“Born and raised” in St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church, Walter McCloney said he strives to keep his “commitment (to the church) palatable.”Walter McCloney is one of the oldest members of St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Beaumont. (Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)The Beaumont Enterprise reports the 79-year-old church trustee said St. Paul A.M.E Church is a part of the legacy and vision of the “spiritual builders” who founded the church in 1868.“We’re the beneficiaries of what they did,” said McCloney, pointing to the vaulted ceiling and colorful glass windows that adorn the Waverly Street sanctuary.McCloney, the third generation in his family to attend the church, said St. Paul was “very special” to him as one of the oldest Black churches in Beaumont.St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church grew out of a Methodist church organized for Blacks three years after the end of the Civil War, according to historical church documents.Members of the young church met on alternative Sundays in the basement of the Jefferson County Courthouse.A Beaumonter since “the close of the War between the States,” church founder and former slave Woodson Pipkin was known for his “quaint old timey ways and self-respecting habits,” according to church documents.Pipkin formally became the group’s first pastor in 1872 and moved the church to the second story of his residence once located in the 900 block of Market Street. The church soon outgrew the upper story of Pipkin’s home and moved to a larger location on Beaumont’s north side at the site of what is now Alice Keith Park.On Sundays, the church doubled as a school where many church members learned to read and write, according to an account by local historian Judith Linsley.Pipkin later donated a lot on Wall Street that was the “center of activities for Blacks,” witnessing countless births, deaths, weddings and civic ceremonies. St. Paul remained at the downtown location until the early 1960s, when the old building began to give way to “age and decay,” according to church records.When the upper story of the church’s structure caved in, church members made do and held services in the basement. But when a fire destroyed the two-story building, the congregation raised funds to purchase the Waverly Street property.St. Paul “stands on their shoulders” of longtime church members who have “kept the faith,” McCloney said.In the 1940s and 1950s, St. Paul’s was one of the largest Black churches in Beaumont, McCloney said, recalling the days at the downtown location when he and his friends would run to Fowler’s Drug Store after Sunday school to get ice cream before the sermon.While McCloney said he believed all churches that preached a “positive message” during the civil rights era were a part of the movement, St. Paul’s played an active role in the community in the 1960s as a meeting spot for activists and NAACP members.Alice Jefferson Tiller, whose family were longtime members of St. Paul, was one of the first African-Americans to enroll at Lamar University in 1956, according to McCloney.While its membership has slowly dwindled, McCloney said he looks forward to reaching out to families and communities to become a part of the church’s legacy.“This is our family,” said Bobbie Williams, who joined the church in the 1980s after moving here from Louisiana.Williams said she joined St. Paul after feeling “so at ease” in the church.Years ago, women weren’t seen in church without hats or gloves, Williams recalled, adding that St. Paul’s “down-to-earth” and no-frills atmosphere made her feel welcome.Williams used to sit in the same pew as the late Fayetta Donovan, one of Pipkin’s descendants, who Williams said was “a lot of fun.”Whenever the preacher would “preach too long,” Donovan would begin to shake her keys to signal the end of the hour.“Ms. Donovan always said, if they preach too long, the people will lose their spirit,” Williams said.Church founders and organizers “kept the faith for so long,” McCloney said. He is proud to be a part of the tight-knit congregation and “a lifelong member of that legacy.”___Information from: The Beaumont Enterprise, http://beaumontenterprise.comlast_img read more

first_img“The Dirac monopole is conceptually the simplest model for a magnetic point charge (i.e. a magnetic monopole) and this makes the Dirac monopole important,” Pietilä said. “Monopoles in general can be any point-like defects in a three-component vector field defined in three spatial dimensions, but they are not necessarily associated with a singular filament (the Dirac string).”Through modeling, Pietilä and Möttönen theoretically demonstrate that the Dirac string can be split into two parts by modifying the external magnetic field, which breaks the rotation symmetry of the system. In this case, state-of-the-art experimental methods that measure changes in particle density and spin density could be used to detect a signature of the monopole. In addition, in spin-1 BEC, the spin texture is topologically unstable, allowing it to be removed. Through simulations, the scientists show that removing the monopole could be done by turning off the external magnetic fields. The monopole “unwinds” itself along the Dirac string and leaves behind a closed vortex ring. The speed of the unwinding depends on how quickly or gradually the magnetic field is turned off.The existence of magnetic monopoles has far-reaching implications for many research areas, including the laws of quantum mechanics, theories of elementary particles, and cosmology. Experimentally confirming the existence of monopoles would provide long-sought evidence for some ideas, and possibly open up the doors to other new ones.“The existence of magnetic monopoles implies that the electric charge has to be quantized (that is, it can only appear as an integral multiple of the elementary charge),” Pietilä said. “Existence of magnetic monopoles has also certain cosmological implications. Since monopoles in general are related to the spontaneous symmetry breaking, they impact the unified theories describing the interactions between the elementary particles. In the context of condensed matter physics, monopoles typically arise as a manifestation of some exotic collective behavior of matter and can be used to explain the unusual characteristics of such systems.”More information: Ville Pietilä and Mikko Möttönen. “Creation of Dirac Monopoles in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates.” Physical Review Letters 103, 030401 (2009). link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.030401Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — For decades, scientists have been intrigued by the hypothetical existence of magnetic monopoles – particles with only a north or south magnetic pole, thus having a nonzero magnetic charge. But while modern theories predict their existence, monopoles have not yet been experimentally observed, despite numerous attempts. Recently, physicists have introduced a new method to create analogies to magnetic monopoles, and predict that they could be observed with current technology. Possible configurations for the spin texture of a Bose-Einstein condensate. These defects give rise to a vorticity field that is equivalent to the magnetic field of a magnetic monopole. Credit: Pietilä and Möttönen. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: Physicists Propose a Method to Observe Dirac Monopoles (2009, July 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-physicists-method-dirac-monopoles.html Ville Pietilä and Mikko Möttönen, both of the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland and the University of New South Wales in Australia, have published their theoretical demonstration in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. Here, they explain how applying an external magnetic field to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) – a large group of cold atoms that exhibits coherent quantum properties – can create point-like topological defects on the spin texture of the BEC. These defects give rise to a vorticity field that is essentially equivalent to the magnetic field of a magnetic monopole.“Since all experimental attempts to find magnetic monopoles have proven to be futile, there is no experimental evidence supporting the existence of magnetic monopoles,” Pietilä told PhysOrg.com. “Other types of monopoles without the Dirac string have been realized in experiments already in the early ‘90s in liquid crystals. An analogy of the real space magnetic monopole was reported to occur in the crystal momentum space of a metallic ferromagnet, but the experimental evidence in this case is somewhat indirect. Dirac monopoles in the more general settings are predicted to occur in various systems such as superfluid Helium-3 and dilute spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate but so far there are no (direct) experimental observations although they may have been present in some of the Helium-3 experiments. There is also a very recent suggestion on how to induce a magnetic monopole to a band insulator.“Since magnetic monopoles have never been observed, it is pertinent to ask whether there is something unphysical in the whole concept,” he continued. “Our work shows that at least the Dirac monopole can be realized experimentally, thus indicating that it is more than just a theoretical curiosity. However, it should be stressed that our work does not tell anything about the existence of magnetic monopoles in the electromagnetic field.”Pietilä and Möttönen predict that it should be possible to design an experiment to detect the monopole in this situation, if it does exist. As they explain, the magnetic field of the monopole is provided by a Dirac string, which is a line extending from the monopole to infinity. The Dirac string explains why the monopole charge comes in discrete quanta. Since the Dirac string carries two quanta of angular momentum, it is expected to be prone to splitting into two separate strings, each carrying a single quantum. Making magnetic monopoles, and other exotica, in the lablast_img read more

first_img Explore further More information: The gravity tunnel in a non-uniform Earth, Am. J. Phys. 83, 231 (2015); dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.4898780 . On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1308.1342AbstractThis paper examines the gravity tunnel using the internal structure of Earth as ascertained from seismic data. Numerically, it is found that the time taken to fall along the diameter is 38 min, compared to 42 min for a planet with uniform density. The time taken to fall along a straight line between any two points is no longer independent of distance but interpolates between 42 min for short trips and 38 min for long trips. The brachistochrone path (minimizing the time between any two points) is similar in shape to the uniform-density solution but tends to reach a greater maximum depth and takes less time to traverse. Although the assumption of uniform density works well in many cases, the simpler assumption of a constant gravitational field serves as a better approximation to the true results. Are astronauts really weightless? A composite image of the Western hemisphere of the Earth. Credit: NASA (Phys.org)—Alexander Klotz a student at McGill University in Canada has calculated a new answer to the commonly asked physics question, how long would it take a person to fall all the way through the Earth? Instead of the commonly accepted 42 minutes, he claims it is 38. He has published his reasoning, math and conclusions in a paper published in The American Journal of Physics. © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: American Journal of Physicscenter_img If someone were to drill a hole all the way through the planet, and then somehow manage to fall into it, how long would it take them to arrive on the other side? That is a physics question put to students every year, and those who give it expect the answer to be 42 minutes. But is that answer correct? Klotz says no and has the math to prove it, Science reported.The accepted answer of 42 minutes takes into account the constantly changing impact that gravity will have (and ignoring drag due to the presence of air) on the person falling, becoming less and less of a factor as the center of the Earth is approached then growing stronger and stronger as the person heads “up” against gravity on the other side. It is accepted that the speed attained during the descent on the first half of the journey would be significant enough to cause the person to continue moving against gravity on the other side of the planet, right up until the surface is reached.But Klotz argues that it is time to start taking the different densities of the Earth’s layers into consideration—after all, a lot of research has shown that our planet is a lot denser at the center than at the crust for example—and that of course would have an impact on the person falling through. He has used seismic data to calculate the different densities at different depths and has used that data to give a more accurate answer to the falling man question, stating that it would in fact, take just 38 minutes (and 11 seconds) to fall all the way through, not 42 and (12 seconds).Interestingly, Klotz also notes that if gravity were to be assumed to be at a surface level constant throughout the duration of the trip, the math shows it would take just 38 minutes as well. , Science , arXiv Citation: New way to calculate how long it would take to fall through a hole in the Earth (2015, March 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-fall-hole-earth.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more