first_imgResidents in parts of West Donegal have been without water in recent days – and some homes have not had water since Saturday.The community of Mín Doire Dhamh in Gaoth Dobhair has been struggling without water for the past three days.Doire Chonaire, Machaire Rabhartaigh and Glaise Chú have also been affected by outages. One Montessori in Machaire Rabhartaigh did not get their supplies restored until this morning.Irish Water crews have been working on the burst water main in Mín Doire Dhamh today and expect to have supplies restored by 2pm.Local Councillor Michael Cholm MacGiolla Easpuig said he has called for an emergency meeting with Irish Water on the issue.“Irish Water refuse to meet on request,” Cllr Mac Giolla Easpuig said. “These issues are a clear indication of the failure of the previous governments to invest into water infrastructure. Especially at the time of the so-called Celtic Tiger, when there was a surplus of money, they were ignorant to the needs of the infrastructure, or they actually didn’t care. “What needs to happen now is huge investment needs to be made into water infrastructure.“In the best interests of the community, the State needs to return the water service so the Council can deliver,” he said.  West Donegal residents hit by lengthy water outages was last modified: August 27th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgIn 72 hours College of the Redwoods men’s basketball has matched its win total from the previous two seasons, combined.Thomas Nelson hit four 3-pointers in the first-quarter and finished with five and 36 points, leading Redwoods to a 75-66 win over Monterey Peninsula College Saturday morning on the final day of the San Jose Tipoff tournament in San Jose.Nelson scored 23 of his 36 points in the first-half, 18 of them coming in the first-quarter.“We knew as soon as he woke up that (Nelson) was …last_img read more

first_imgPragatisheel Samajwadi Party (Lohia) chief Shivpal Yadav on Sunday described the SP-BSP-RLD combine as an “alliance of crooks” and claimed that it would not be able to cross the double-digit mark in the Lok Sabha election.‘Mayawati filed cases’ Addressing a public meeting in Uttar Pradesh’s Sambhal district, Shivpal Yadav said: “(BSP chief) Mayawati, during her stint as the Chief Minister of U.P., had got cases registered against ‘netaji’ (Samajwadi Party patriarch Mulayam Yadav). She had unleashed atrocities on SP workers.” “And, now, (SP chief) Akhilesh had shook hands with the same Mayawati. This is not a ‘gathbandhan’ of the SP-BSP, it is ‘thagbandhan’ (alliance of crooks),” said Shivpal Yadav, who is the estranged uncle of Akhilesh Yadav. The PSPL leader said the SP-BSP-RLD combine would not succeed in the general election. “You will see that this alliance will not be able to cross the double-digit mark,” he said. Pointing out that the Samajwadi Party was fighting on 35 Lok Sabha seats this time, Shivpal Yadav said: “But when the reins of party were in ‘netaji’s’ hand, the SP used to fight on all 80 Lok Sabha seats.” He claimed that the PSPL was a bigger party than the Samajwadi Party, saying the former was fighting on 60 Lok Sabha seats in the State and on 27 seats across 11 States. “We will win 15 seats and be a part of the government at the Centre,” Shivpal Yadav added.last_img read more

first_imgMost, like the white mischiefgirls, don’t seem to mind.Last year, Indian Premier League (IPL) parties were big, glitzy, open house affairs where film stars danced with cricketers and cheerleaders. IPL after-parties, titled IPL Nights, were broadcast on TV and the media was invited. Mehr Jessia Rampal organised fashion shows organised, top-flight players put,Most, like the white mischiefgirls, don’t seem to mind.Last year, Indian Premier League (IPL) parties were big, glitzy, open house affairs where film stars danced with cricketers and cheerleaders. IPL after-parties, titled IPL Nights, were broadcast on TV and the media was invited. Mehr Jessia Rampal organised fashion shows organised, top-flight players put in an appearance and the then IPL Commissioner Lalit Modi preened. It’s another story that last year’s dos were blamed for the poor performance of several cricketers. So much so that when Chirayu Amin took charge of the IPL after Modi’s exit, the first thing he objected to was the ‘specially ticketed event’ leading to a ban on after-parties.In IPL Season 4, the parties have been banned-not for cricketers or the sponsors, but for the media. And for cheerleaders as well, ever since Gabriella Pasqualotto, 22, blew the whistle on the seamier side of the game, describing cheerleaders as “walking porn” and certain cricketers as “naughty”. Most top Indian cricketers now take the party elsewhere, smoking and drinking discreetly behind closed doors-away from the prying eyes of the fans and fanfare. The foreign players hang around disconsolately.Take the IPL party after the Bangalore match, where Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) beat Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) on May 13. It was the day after Pasquolotto had been sent off to Johannesburg, South Africa, for writing an all-too-frank blog. There were no young girls in hot pants. Cricketers Virat Kohli, Abhimanyu Mithun, Brett Lee, Jacques Kallis and Mark Boucher walked in a good three hours after the match and stuck together. Tilakaratne Dilshan and Chris Gayle didn’t dance with the girls as they did after the win on May 8.advertisementGabriella Pasqualotto has described cheerleaders asAnd it’s all thanks to “Gabby”, aka Pasquolotto, who is now fielding offers of a Bollywood movie and an Indian reality TV show. “We’re as good as grounded. Like little schoolchildren,” says a cheerleader referring to her former teammate from Mumbai Indians. In Bangalore, the girls missing from the party were the White Mischief cheerleaders, named after the vodka brand that belongs to Vijay Mallya’s United Spirits Limited. “We are in a country where we don’t know anyone. Why would we not want to go to a party and have some fun? What Gabby did was very unprofessional,” says a cheerleader for Mumbai Indians.”We do have people to look after us, but that doesn’t mean the odd sponsor won’t paw us at a party. All this ogling in public can be unsettling, but you get used to it after a bit,” says a cheerleader from Kings XI Punjab. IPL has sourced most of its cheerleaders from South Africa, thanks to their familiarity with cricket. “We all love cricket and that’s one of the reasons we were chosen,” says Denise Schoeman, 24, a White Mischief girl. Schoeman is a beauty pageant winner back home and this is her second season with IPL. Cheerleaders are reportedly paid 8,000 rand (Rs 52,000) a month.What about the ogling by the Indian spectators? “We have received so much warmth. We go shopping and buy saris, or go out for a meal, escorted of course, and I cannot tell you how much fun we have. We have absolutely no cause for complaint,” says Schoeman.Neither does Pasqualotto, who will return to India to attend the inaugural Formula 1 event in October. “My agent will talk later,” she said in an e-mail to India Today. “I cannot divulge details,” Amanda, her mother, said when asked if Pasqualotto had already landed film role. Who knows, she just might make it to the IPL Season 5 after-party as a star guest.last_img read more

first_imgLaurie Hamelin APTN National NewsNext month the federal government will have to decide if the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline gets the go-ahead to expand or not.At the moment, the pipeline that runs from Alberta to Vancouver, carries about 300,000 barrels of oil a day.The proposal to expand the pipeline sparked a number of protests in British Columbia.And in Vancouver, thousands of people marched through the city’s downtown to continue to voice their opposition to the project.lhamelin@aptn.calast_img read more

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Georgetown, Guyana June 7, 2017 – The Caribbean Community (Caricom) has reaffirmed its support of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change following the US decision to withdraw from the accord. US President Donald Trump announced the withdrawal last Thursday saying that a renegotiation of terms was in the works. The US is one of only three countries not to sign the agreement which seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally. The decision is unpopular both within and outside of the US. Individual US states are working to comply with the accord outside of the federal government.In a statement, Caricom Chairman and Guyana President David Granger said although Caricom was disappointed by the withdrawal, the region remained encouraged by the many nations who have signed the agreement. “The need for global action to combat this phenomenon is past urgent…Our own commitment will never waiver. Our existence is at stake,” he said.  Granger added that Climate Change is an “existential threat” to the Caribbean which is made up of Small Island and Low-Lying Development States or SIDS. He also noted that the Paris Agreement on Climate Change was “more than just another international agreement on another complex international issue.” According to Granger, “it reflects the acknowledgment and acceptance that climate change is a global issue requiring global solutions.”Individual nation states have also denounced the decision. The Bahamas Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the withdrawal was a cause for concern and pledged to continue working towards ending Climate Change.#MagneticMediaNews#ParisAgreement #ClimateChange Bahamas to take 15-member delegation to CARICOM meeting set in Mo’Bay, Jamaica Recommended for you CARICOM Inter-Sessional Meeting discussions conclude on high notecenter_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, CARICOM, climate change, donald trump, Paris Agreement Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp UN SG is Special Guest at Opening Ceremony for CARICOM Heads Meeting Wednesdaylast_img read more

first_img2.  Measuring the performance and sustainability (with higher renewal rates) of native campaigns is difficultAs of now, the average renewal rate for brands to buy ads on a site two months after running a campaign is 40 percent.Publishers have found that measuring campaign success with branded content isn’t simply a matter of impressions or clicks. Success doesn’t always come in a standard measurement across campaigns, but there will be metrics and a report card at the end of the flight. It’s important for content providers to get creative when proving their ROI.For example, Nike’s marketing of Colin Kaepernick led to increased store traffic and higher online sales. Barron’s reported that Nike saw a 31-percent increase in sales the week after Kaepernick was announced as the latest face of the company’s long-running “Just Do It” campaign. So yes, sales matter. There are also measures for gauging perception and awareness, before and after a campaign. MediaRadar has learned many companies are using Catalina or iRI for measuring CPG sales in supermarkets to help show the impact of native content. 1.  Few media firms stand out when it comes to native content.MediaRadar CEO, Todd Krizelman, hosted two recent panels discussing native content. In both cases, the speakers agreed they should not differentiate their native advertising offerings by using a lower price. They use other differentiators like audience, brand safety, and creative execution to make their branded content stand out. Using key differentiators beyond price will win more business.Some groups, like Meredith Corp., have uncovered at least one additional element that makes their offering unique. It has developed competency in making its content “shoppable.” For example, inside online recipes, users can find a link to  purchase the ingredients. Publishers should aim to be more innovative like Meredith. Recently, MediaRadar published a trend report about native advertising. Every day, we see custom content weaving its way into just about every form of consumable content. Native continues to be one of the most popular methods in which advertisers can engage with their audiences digitally.Last year, native advertising spend was more than any other form of display advertising and, in the first half of 2018, new advertisers began using native advertising every month (read the full report here).Recently, however, it looks like the market is plateauing. Roughly 11 percent of online advertisers use native advertising formats now, and brands that buy native ads only run them across 10 percent of the total number of sites that they advertise on. Why is this happening?Here are nine fast facts to keep in mind as you sell custom content: 8.  The number of firms receiving RFP’s for native content is decreasing.Recently, MediaRadar met with a dozen media buyers at major agencies. In this room of buyers, there was a refreshing and specific consensus surrounding the number of RFPs being submitted for native content. This group feels that the number of RFPs is not declining, but that the number of firms receiving them is.Many agencies like to work with firms that can offer “One-Stop Shopping” for branded content. They want to work with a publisher who has the capacity to deliver a unified solution across media formats (desktop, mobile, email, experiential, etc.). 3.  Crafting native content takes a lot of time and effort.A great story and design require both time and talent to produce. Neither of these are areas that advertisers and content creators can afford to overlook. The actual process of crafting a native ad or campaign is a costly, multistep process, involving a lot of collaboration and rounds of review, done over a long period of time. 9.  The consolidation of in-house studios seems inevitable.Branded content studios exist within publishing houses to help create native ads, branded content, traditional ad assets, editorial content with a twist, and more. But, with the boom in the number of in-house studios for advertisers to choose from, consolidation seems inevitable.Publishers are bound to pool their creative resources together. In a recent Adweek panel, Chief Revenue Officer (CRO) of BuzzFeed, Lee Brown, predicted that “in the next 12 months, you’re going to see a massive amount of consolidation.” 7.  RFP’s can be really important to a publisher’s native content business.RFP’s are very important to a national consumer publisher’s business. Native advertising has proven not to be an exception, as publishers see up to 95 percent of their content business originates from an RFP. The RFP may originate from the brand or the agency. This may be a surprise, since many have contended that the RFP is dying (here, here, here, and here).Yet, while RFPs remain popular in the national consumer media space, it is felt that they are a poor fit for native advertising. Generally, publishers should respond within 24 to 72 hours from receiving the RFP. Since most branded content projects are quite customized and involved, having just three business days isn’t long enough to come up with a great pitch. 4.  Native advertising has the potential to be too discrete.Audiences don’t want to be disrupted by ads, but they also don’t want to be duped into believing that an advertisement is anything other than what it is. Consumers should only be exposed to online advertisements that are fair, clear, and engaging. To avoid the possibility that native advertising dupes its consumers, know how to spot native advertising. The FTC also generated a Native Advertising Guide, a manual instructing advertisers and publishers on how and when to use certain terminology and obvious labels in its ads to not deceive its viewers. 5.  Custom content is more trustworthy than traditional advertising.According to a Time Inc. study, two in three Gen-Z, Millennials, and Gen-X consumers trust branded content more than traditional advertising. As a more visually inclined generation, Gen-Z is open to engaging with custom content because, compared with traditional ads, it’s more entertaining, thought-provoking, and leaves a lasting impression. 6.  Pitch native content directly to the client, not to their agency.There is often a “much, much better understanding” of what the business needs are when talking directly to a client. It is felt that agencies are time-strapped and less plugged-in when it comes to native advertising. Also, it makes a publisher look good when they take a big idea to the client to make sure it really was heard.Success rates vary by publishing house, however. A national women’s publishing group reports that 60 percent of its business originates from the brand directly. A large regional newspaper shared with MediaRadar that their ratio was closer to 50/50 while a niche travel website and magazine reports that it wins the most business directly from clients (90 percent). Native advertising is still successful, despite its recent plateau. That’s why it’s important for publishers to identify opportunities with native in 2018 like finding more unique ways to produce native ads that will make them stand out from their competition and more.To get an even more in-depth analysis of this native advertising trend, be sure to read MediaRadar’s In-Depth Look Into the Current State of Native Advertising.last_img read more

first_imgRatha Yatra, the chariot festival of Sri Jagannath Dev and one of the major festivals of the Hindu community, will begin tomorrow.The festival will come to an end with Ulto Ratha Yatra (reverse journey) on 3 July.In observance of the festival, different religious bodies and temple committees have drawn up various programmes. The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKON) has chalked out a nine-day programme in Dhaka.The country’s largest Ratha Yatra festival will be held at Dhamrai in Manikganj district.The programmes of the festival begins in the morning with rendering of Harisangkirtan, holding of Agnihotra Jagna seeking world peace and people’s welfare, recitation of verses from Srimat Bhagabat Geeta, distribution of mohaprosad, discussion, rendition of padaboli kirtan and arati, cultural function, staging of religious drama and screening of religious films.The programmes of the ISKON at Swamibag in Dhaka starts with holding of Agnihotra Jagna seeking divine blessings for world peace and people’s welfare. At noon, a discussion will be organised on its premises.Civil aviation and tourism minister Rashed Khan Menon will attend the discussion as the chief guest.Indian High Commissioner in Dhaka Harsh Vardhan Shringla will formally inaugurate the festival there by lighting “Mongol Pradeep” (lamp of welfare) after the discussion.Later in the afternoon, a colourful procession will be brought out from Swamibagh setting images of Sri Jagannath Dev, his brother Sri Balaram and sister Srimati Subhadra on three largely build Rathas (chariots).Then the devotees will pull the ropes of the chariots through Tikatuli, Ittefak intersection, Shapla Chattar, Dainik Bangla, Purana Paltan intersection, National Press Club, High Court crossing, Doel Square, Dhaka University TSC, Jagannath Hall, Palashi Crossing and rounded up the Ratha Yatra on the premises of the Dhakeswari National Temple.Besides, the Rathjatra festival will also be celebrated at Ramseeta Mandir at Joikali Mandir Road, at Shankharibazar and Jagannath Jeo Mandir at Tantibazar in old city and other places across the country.The Traffic Division of Dhaka Metropolitan Police (DMP) requested the vehicle drivers to use diversion roads for the sake of smooth and peaceful holding of Ratha Yatra.last_img read more

first_imgA 55-year-old woman was killed by a covered van which hit her while crossing the road in the capital’s Badda area in front of Fuji Tower on Saturday morning.The deceased, Rizia Begum, 55, is from Gangni of Kushtia. She came to Dhaka to visit her son Abdul Mannan.Leaving her son’s house, Rizia was crossing the road on the way to the bus stop. The van hit her then.The deceased was immediately rushed to the Dhaka Medical College Hospital’s (DMCH) emergency unit. The physicians there declared her dead.Sub-inspector Md Bacchu Miah of DMCH police camp said the body had been sent to the morgue for autopsy.Police seized the van and are looking for the driver to arrest him, added the SI.last_img read more

first_imgThe doomsday scenarioVoter registration databases were being breached. Pundits were loudly questioning the integrity of the election. Americans’ confidence that their votes would be counted fairly and accurately hung in the balance — with widespread chaos looming just on the horizon.Elections officials from more than 35 states huddled in groups; every time they decided to fund a new resource or deploy a new strategy, news of a new vulnerability sprouted. Reporters hounded for answers, as government employees received highly targeted phishing emails designed to coax their passwords. Simultaneously, a virus penetrated government devices by coming through the printers, which were connected to the internet.It was voting problem whack-a-mole. The way the election directors handled the pandemonium would determine the future of American democracy.Luckily, this time, it was only a drill.The 150 or so officials gathered at Harvard University for a worst-case scenario exercise meant to push the officials’ abilities to prepare and react in the case of a broader attack than America saw from Russia leading up to 2016.Arizona director of elections Eric Spencer, an Iraq war veteran, compared the preparations he and his team are making to his training as an infantry officer.“We always trained harder in the United States for combat to make it easier when we got overseas, and I see this as the same thing,” he said. “[Crisis scenarios] were nearly non-existent a few years ago. In 2016, before we got information that elections were subject to foreign interference, it was in the back of our mind but now it’s probably the number one item in our mind.”Most of the focus so far has been on the more than dozen states still using electronic voting machines that don’t provide a paper backup trail; experts say these machines could allow potential hacks or even technological glitches to go undetected.In its most recent spending bill, Congress has allocated $380 million for voting security, but the funding will be allocated across all 50 states by population in a way that won’t necessarily address the vulnerabilities of electronic voting machines anytime soon.In fact, it isn’t clear how much of a dent that money might make overall because no one, including the federal government, knows for sure how much American elections cost in the first place.“Figuring out the true cost of election administration in this country is the white whale of the discipline,” said Doug Chapin, an elections researcher at the University of Minnesota. “I don’t think we even have a really good estimate …. which is why it can be difficult when policy makers, say ‘OK, how much do you need?’ Usually the answer is: ‘more.’” Drew Anthony Smith/Getty ImagesA pedestrian walks past Austin City Hall, an early voting center, in March. Texas was the first state to go to the polls to vote in midterm primaries. As America heads toward the 2018 midterms, there’s an elephant in the voting booth.Despite improvements since Russia’s attack on the 2016 presidential race, the U.S. elections infrastructure is vulnerable — and will remain so in November.Cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier laid out the problem to an overflowing room full of election directors and secretaries of state — people charged with running and securing elections — at a conference at Harvard University this spring.“Computers are basically insecure,” said Schneier. “Voting systems are not magical in any way. They are computers.” The needs are not equal“Some states are much better off when it comes to protecting their elections systems. And remember, the Russians in particular don’t have to attack every state, they’ll go to the weakest link,” said Eric Rosenbach, director of the Belfer Center leading the security exercises, to the Senate Homeland Security Committee. “All they have to do is undermine trust in the system and confidence in the outcome.”But these issues are bigger than the security of the machines that voters use.(Interactive: How secure is your vote?)“The focus regarding the new election security funding seems to be disproportionately focused only on paper ballots and audits. Those are very important, but it will also be nearly impossible to implement these changes prior to 2018,” said David Becker, the executive director of the Center for Election Innovation and Research.He continued: “Meanwhile, other areas of security – voter registration database security (the one area where we know there was one breach in 2016), staff training (proper login protocols, spear-phishing education, etc.), hiring of skilled technical staff – are all just as important and could be done immediately.”There are questions about whether a subsequent attack might target systems at that level: rather than trying to change individual votes, a cyber-adversary might try to erase or change all the registration documents in a particular place on Election Day, just to cause chaos. House Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, has warned about the danger of this kind of “cyber-bomb”.Election officials in the more than 10,000 voting jurisdictions are tasked with tackling it all, with differing resources at their disposable. Harvard’s Belfer Center released a playbook for actionable, and often cheap, cyber security tips.And March’s exercises were framed as “train the trainer” workshops, with the hope that the election directors present would then go back to their respective states and localities and run similar drills.Experts often talk about the simple human element of cyber security — being able to spot a phishing email, or choosing a strong password. After all, many voting jurisdictions have small IT departments who may also be responsible for running other city and town infrastructure — they aren’t resourced to defend against an attack by a nation-state.“It’s going to be a real culture shift, it’s going to have to be something we repeat over and over again until it becomes ingrained in our every day activity,” said Jennifer Morrell, the Deputy of Elections and Recording for Arapahoe County, Co.“Most of the conversations around this have been your state and local directors and now we’ve got to filter that down – it’s going to take a little while.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Even though most states have moved away from voting equipment that does not produce a paper trail, when experts talk about “voting systems,” that phrase encompasses the entire process of voting: how citizens register to vote, how they find their polling places, how they check in, how they cast their ballots, and ultimately how they find out who won.Much of that process is digital.“This is the problem we always have in computer security — basically nobody has ever built a secure computer. That’s the reality,” Schneier said. “I want to build a robust system that is secure despite the fact that computers have vulnerabilities, rather than pretend that they don’t because no one has found them yet. And people will find them — whether it’s nation states or teenagers on a weekend.”Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who sits on the Senate intelligence committee looking into Russia’s attack on the 2016 election, warned elections officials in his state not to be complacent.“I cannot emphasize enough the vulnerability,” Rubio said, according to the Tampa Bay Times. “I don’t think [election officials] fully understand the nature of the threat.”Talking in public about these dangers is a tough balancing act. Transparency in elections is a key component to a working democracy — but election officials want citizens to vote, so they have to portray confidence in the system.There remains no evidence, as lawmakers and election heads often point out, that any votes were actually changed in the 2016 election.But the Department of Homeland Security says Russian hackers did break into the registration system in one state, Illinois, and steal the username and password of an election official in another, Arizona — and targeted or probed the voting systems of at least 21 states.So in the span of just two years, officials have gone from arguing their systems are completely secure, to talking openly and clearly about the specific issues that exist and working to fix them.But a lack of time and resources means heading into the 2018 midterms, American voting systems remain vulnerable, and as Rubio noted, there’s no synchronicity among states and jurisdiction about where the country is in terms of security. 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