first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Denver Post:Erin Martinez was at a news conference in February when Colorado legislative leaders and Gov. Jared Polis announced a bill that would make sweeping changes to how oil and gas are regulated. And she and her family had a front-row seat as Polis signed the bill into law Tuesday.Martinez was one of the strongest supporters of Senate Bill 19-181, which changes the mission of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the main regulatory body for the industry. She spoke during a news conference and testified in hearings for the bill’s overarching goal — putting public health, safety and the environment first when considering oil and gas development.As he prepared to sign the bill, Polis said he hoped the new law will end the conflicts over the drilling that has increased in more populated areas. “Today, with the signing of this bill, it is our hope that the oil and gas wars that have enveloped our state are over and the winner is all of us,” Polis said.The bill makes protecting public health and safety and the environment a priority when considering oil and gas projects. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the main regulatory body, would no longer be charged with fostering development.It also allows cities and counties to regulate oil and gas development under their planning and land-use powers, something communities have requested as drilling has increased in and near the growing cities and counties north and east of Denver.The oil and gas commission and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment will start writing rules to implement several portions of the new law. Some of the rules are expected to take up to a year to develop. The public will have opportunities to weigh in.More: Gov. Jared Polis ushers in new era of drilling regulation, but are “oil and gas wars” over? Colorado governor signs legislation overhauling state’s oil and gas development ruleslast_img read more

first_imgRed Bluff >> With 3 goals in the opening half and a pair in the second half Friday night, the Red Bluff Spartans soccer team cruised to a home win over the Enterprise Hornets, 5-1.With the win the Spartans go to 8-3-1 and are even at 1-1 in league play. They are scheduled to face the Chico Panthers (11-1-1 overall, 2-0 league) at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday in Chico.Lady Spartans 1, Enterprise 1Redding >> The Lady Spartans came from behind to tie the Enterprise Hornets Friday, 1-1, in Redding. …last_img read more

first_imgRayn Tripp lead all scorers with 18 points, Theresia Dickey added 12 more and the McKinleyville Panthers subdued the St. Bernard’s Crusaders 53-42 in the championship round of the Lady Panther Classic, Saturday afternoon at McKinleyville High.“I like how our girls are playing,” McKinleyville head coach Anthony McClure said. “We still have a lot of improvements we can make, but the more wins like this that we can get as we head into league play means a lot for our confidence going forward.”McKi …last_img read more

first_imgIf election campaigns mean shrill rhetoric and sharp attacks on political rivals, Prahlad Singh Tipaniya could well stand out for his unique approach. A stranger to the world of politics so far but a renowned folk singer from the Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh, Mr. Tipaniya has been declared as the Congress candidate from Dewas, a reserved seat for Scheduled Castes.The folk singer, whose mastery of Kabir bhajans is well known, said he will reach out to his voters through his bhajans.“I will talk about well-being, compassion and progress through my bhajans,” said Prahlad-ji, as he is popularly called, while speaking to The Hindu over phone from his ancestral village of Luniyakhedi in Ujjain district. At a time when election speeches have become more about sharp, personal attacks on rivals, will bhajans be enough to take on his rivals? “You can put me in politics, but can’t take the bhajan out of me. Everyone has a point of view. My view is that while some have a more ugra (aggressive) way of putting across their ideas, you can permanently change someone’s mind only when you can convince him with conviction,” he said.A Padma Shri recipient, Mr. Tipaniya, who now spends most of his time talking of Sadguru Kabir Sewa Smarak Shodh Sansthan, has travelled around the world, spreading the message of compassion and fraternity as propounded by Kabir, a 15th century poet who is now regarded as a saint by his followers.Asked how he plans to handle the divisive discourse during elections, especially with regard to polarising issues such as religion and caste, he offers Kabir’s dohas (couplets) to make a point about ignorance.”What is the religion of paani (water), hawa (air) or a tree? Don’t you know that they exist to serve everyone?” said the folk singer, who retired as a school science teacher.“If the Sadguru [Sant Kabir] gives me the opportunity to serve the people through politics, then I will do so. I have not yet thought about what will happen if they target me personally,” he added.last_img read more

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Pixabay (Pixabay License) Senior United States Senator from Utah, Michael Lee, has introduced the Open America’s Water Act of 2019, a bill which would repeal the Jones Act and allow all qualified vessels to engage in domestic trade between U.S. ports.“Restricting trade between U.S. ports is a huge loss for American consumers and producers. It is long past time to repeal the Jones Act entirely so that Alaskans, Hawaiians, and Puerto Ricans aren’t forced to pay higher prices for imported goods—and so they rapidly receive the help they need in the wake of natural disasters,” Lee explained.In 1920, Congress passed the Jones Act, which requires all goods transported by water between U.S. ports to be carried on a vessel constructed in the U.S., registered in the U.S., owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed primarily by U.S. citizens.The Cato Institute estimates that after accounting for the inflated costs of transportation and infrastructure, the forgone wages and output, the lost domestic and foreign business revenue, and the monetized environmental toll the annual cost of the Jones Act is in the tens of billions of dollars. And that figure doesn’t even include the annual administration and oversight costs of the law.last_img read more