first_imgThe United States has fired the opening shot in the latest softwood-lumber war against Canada, with the Trump administration announcing its first batch of duties on imported wood in the neighbourhood of 20 per cent.The move was expected: the deep-rooted dispute over lumber pricing between the two countries has led to once-a-decade trade skirmishes over the issue, resulting in American duties, then the inevitable court battles, and ultimately negotiated settlements.What wasn’t expected Monday was the enthusiasm with which the new American administration flung itself into the lumber hostilities, touting its incoming countervailing duties as an example of U.S. President Donald Trump’s tough, America-first trade posture.Trump underscored the impending move by announcing it to a gathering of conservative media on the eve of the expected announcement. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross also highlighted it in an interview.Then came a statement that said U.S. Customs will begin collecting cash deposits from Canadian logging companies because they receive a range of subsidies — most of them around 20 per cent.What comes after the countervailing duties is a study of possible anti-dumping duties, followed by a final determination by the U.S. Commerce Department as early as Sept. 7, and one of three possible outcomes: an agreement, a surprise retreat from the U.S. government or potential years-long court battles.It will all play out amid the backdrop of a bigger trade file: the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement.America’s lumber lobby applauded the announcement.“We are pleased with this initial outcome and are looking forward to the (next, anti-dumping) duties expected to be announced June 23,” said Zoltan van Heyningen of the U.S. Lumber Coalition.“Since this is an ongoing matter, we are limiting our comments to our press release.”A late-evening statement from the U.S. administration accused companies of benefiting subsidies ranging from three per cent by J.D. Irving Ltd., to 12.82 per cent for Resolute FP Canada, Ltd., to 20.26 per cent for Canfor Corp., to a high of 24.12 per cent for West Fraser Mills, with most others coming in at 19.88 per cent.Duties will be collected retroactively, too — the U.S. says it will gather them for the previous 90 days. Industry analysts expect the combined duties, Monday’s and the upcoming ones, to range between 30 and 40 per cent.In Canada, pressure will mount on the federal government.The government has adopted an a understated, under-the-radar approach to dealing with Trump. But now as it responds to the U.S. move, it must juggle ongoing softwood negotiations, upcoming NAFTA renegotiations, and a frustrated industry at home.There are already requests for it to provide financial help for Canada’s forestry sector. A government source said conversations are underway, but there won’t be an immediate announcement on that front.The Canadian government will wait to see the details of various punitive measures before calculating the aid amount. It took the federal government more than a year to announce the first of two aid packages after duties were imposed in 2001.It first gave more than $300 million in late 2002 and then $1.5 billion in November 2005, with $900 million for loan insurance to help financially strapped exporters that had more than $5 billion tied up in duties.“(The aid determination) really can’t be made until we’ve seen what the rate and penalty will be,” said an official who declined to be identified because they were not authorized to speak publicly.Quebec Economic Development Minister Dominique Anglade urged Ottawa to help forest companies, but said Monday the province will act immediately: “Day 1, we will be there to support the industry,” she said in an interview.Meanwhile, Ontario named former federal trade minister Jim Peterson as its chief softwood lumber negotiator on Monday. He joins former federal cabinet minister David Emerson who represents B.C. and former U.S. ambassador Raymond Chretien who is Quebec’s negotiator.Unifor president Jerry Dias called on Ottawa to respond to the duties to avoid a repeat of the situation when 15,000 were laid off within months of a combined duty of 27 per cent being imposed in the early 2000s.“It’s hard to exaggerate the impact tariffs will have on hundreds of small communities. The federal government needs to have a plan in place and act swiftly,” he said in a news release.However, provinces aren’t in total agreement about financial support.British Columbia has said it is cautious out of fear that assistance will be construed by the Americans as unfairly helping the Canadian industry. B.C. producers such as West Fraser Timber and Canfor are in a stronger position to weather a U.S. trade battle because they have purchased sawmills in the U.S. and expanded exports to China.In Central Canada, sawmills tend to be smaller, don’t have as much cash flow to pay duties and are therefore more at risk of closing, experts say. That’s why Ontario and Quebec producers have been pushing Ottawa to provide loan guarantees to help them pay duties and stay in business.last_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – No winning ticket was sold for the $9 million jackpot in Saturday night’s Lotto 649 draw.However, the guaranteed $1 million prize went to a ticket holder in the Prairies.The jackpot for the next Lotto 649 draw on June 7 will be approximately $12 million.last_img

first_imgMONTREAL – Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre has described U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement as “nonsense.”In his opening address to a gathering of world mayors Tuesday, Coderre criticized Trump’s move to distance the country from the landmark climate agreement.But he added the decision only furthers the resolve of local politicians to fight climate change.“I’d like to thank President Trump because of his nonsense,” Coderre said. “Because in Canada, in Quebec, in Montreal, we believe we should build bridges, not walls, and we will make sure in our own declaration that the mayors of the world will take our responsibility.“And if there are some people who don’t want it, we’ll make it happen and, trust me, the mayors will be able to deliver the accord of Paris.”The Paris agreement was signed by 195 nations in December 2015.Trump said earlier this month he intends to withdraw the United States from the agreement unless it can be renegotiated.Coderre said fighting against climate change forms the consensus among decision-makers.Also addressing the Metropolis World Congress, Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard said he was disappointed by the U.S. stance but added he is happy to see numerous American states and cities taking a stand to continue the fight against climate change.The 12th edition of the congress runs until Thursday and includes 1,000 delegates and some 140 mayors from around the world.Coderre is the current president of the organization.last_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – YouTube is putting a bigger bet on its most successful Canadian creators with a channel dedicated to promoting local talent.The video streaming platform unveiled “Spotlight Canada” on Monday, a curated page that highlights some of the nation’s standout videos. It’s the first time a country has been singled out with its own curated content section.The debut of the page features a selection of past viral hits, including astronaut Chris Hadfield’s collaboration with the Barenaked Ladies from space, the Tragically Hip performing “Bobcaygeon” in Kingston, Ont., last summer, and a selection of trending music videos from Canadian artists. There’s also a section highlighting indigenous musicians and one for “Canada’s favourite YouTube creators.”Another feature called “Creator on the Rise,” which debuts Wednesday, unearths the hottest Canadian clips on YouTube each week. The selection is chosen by algorithms that factor in view count and subscriber growth.YouTube says the entire page will be refreshed each month with a new slate of videos.It’s a pilot project, but Marie Josee Lamothe, a managing director at YouTube’s owner Google, says it makes sense to select Canada as the testing ground for championing homegrown content.Some of the world’s biggest YouTube stars, including breakout creators Lilly Singh, AsapScience and Gigi Gorgeous, transcended the country’s borders and racked up millions of views on their viral clips.“The objective is to showcase Canada’s top stars, but also to help discover emerging Canadian talent,” said Lamothe.“What we want to do is bring a focus to the diverse Canadian voices that create this content.”YouTube says recent data has shown a notable increase in viewership for Canada.In the first half of this year, the amount of time Canadians spent watching YouTube videos jumped by 30 per cent compared to the same period last year.Within that same window, watch time for Canadian channels soared 230 per cent in India, 70 per cent in the U.S. and 60 per cent in Australia.Lamothe says for those reasons alone it makes sense for YouTube to invest more in content from Canada.Google has already opened a 3,500 square-foot facility at the downtown Toronto campus of George Brown College aimed at giving creators the tools they need to make their videos better, like green screens and other high-end technology.“It’s important to promote our own local talent,” added Lamothe. “(This is) a big, fast-growing fan base that is worth supporting.”—Follow @dfriend on Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – Hudson’s Bay Co. has struck a deal to merge its German department stores with its biggest rival in the European market.The Toronto-based retailer, which owns Galeria Kaufhof, announced Tuesday an agreement with Signa Retail Holdings, the Austrian-based brand behind Karstadt, a competitor department store in the market.HBC chief executive Helena Foulkes said the deal will earn HBC $616 million that will be funnelled into reducing debt.“It has been a tough German market and that has been true for every player in the market, so this deal allows both of us to be stronger together,” she told The Canadian Press.“We have an opportunity to create a much better retail business.”The deal, she added, will set the stage for the company to turn its attention to North America.“It really allows us to focus on North America, where I see a tremendous amount of opportunity to create real operational improvements,” she said.Beyond the merger of Karstadt and Galeria Kaufhof, the deal will also involve the European arm of HBC’s Saks Off Fifth brand, Hudson’s Bay in the Netherlands, Karstadt sports stores, Signa’s Galeria INNO stores and both companies’ food and catering businesses.The agreement will also include the creation of a 50-50 real estate venture with 3.25 billion euros in assets.HBC will nab a 49.99 per cent interest in the combined businesses, while the new company will be led by Stephan Fanderl, Karstadt’s chief executive.HBC’s operations in North America have come under fire in recent months, in part because of outspoken stakeholder Jonathan Litt.The chief investment officer and founder of activist investor Land & Buildings Investment Management has complained that HBC is really a real estate company, not a retailer.Foulkes said at the company’s annual general meeting in June that the company was looking at selling certain properties, but was not in a hurry to sell everything quickly.On Tuesday, she said “everything is always on the table,” but that now she is focusing on “driving the banners that we do have…I do see a lot of opportunity to get more value out of them.”Following news of the European deal, Litt said in a statement the $8.71 cash and implied asset value Foulkes expected confirms his feelings that HBC’s real estate value is “likely more than double that of its current share price of $10.78.”“We urge the HBC board to remain vigilant in monetizing assets as long as the company’s shares continue to trade at a material discount to net asset value — as the shares do today — including selling HBC’s remaining interest in the European business, after synergies are realized, in the near future,” he said.HBC bought Kaufhof from German retailer Metro AG in 2015, years before Foulkes joined the company with ambitious plans to turn around weak sales and sizable losses.Signa made an unsolicited offer late last year to buy HBC’s German operations, but withdrew it earlier this year after it was rejected by the HBC board because it undervalued the business.Then, in July, HBC confirmed it was in talks again with the company.HBC said the deal it has struck is still subject to regulator approval in Europe and is expected to close within the next 90 days.The company’s shares closed down nearly two per cent to $10.58 in Tuesday trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.Companies in this story: (TSX:HBC)last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA — When she was 17 years old, Liz was coerced by a Children’s Aid worker into having an abortion and being sterilized at a northwestern Ontario hospital, she says — an experience she’s carried for 40 years.“It was a matter of me almost (being) cornered, if you will, by my worker at the time saying, ‘You better have an abortion because if you don’t, either way, we are going to take that child from you’,” Liz says.New research shows the forced sterilization of Indigenous women is not just a shameful part of Canadian history. Reports from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and the territories suggest it is still happening.Tubal ligations carried out on unwilling Indigenous women is one of the “most heinous” practices in health care happening across Canada, says Yvonne Boyer, a Metis lawyer and former nurse who is now a senator for Ontario.She was first contacted by Liz (who asked not to have her last name published, so she could talk freely about something so personal) in 2017 after a news story detailed research Boyer produced with Metis physician and researcher Dr. Judith Bartlett. Their report detailed how Indigenous women were coerced into tubal ligations — the severing, burning or tying of the Fallopian tubes that carry eggs from the ovaries to the uterus — after childbirth in the Saskatoon Health Region.Boyer now wants the Senate to study the scope of the issue nationally, making it the focus of her first address to the upper chamber.“If it’s happened in Saskatoon, it has happened in Regina, it’s happened in Winnipeg, it’s happened where there’s a high population of Indigenous women,” Boyer says in an interview. “I’ve had many women contact me from across the country and ask me for help.”Some Indigenous women interviewed for the report also felt pushed into signing consent forms for the procedures while they were in active labour or on operating tables, Boyer says, noting a class-action lawsuit against the Saskatoon Health Region was launched in 2017 by two of the affected women.Each claimed $7 million in damages. Now about 60 women are part of the lawsuit, she adds.“If there are 60 women just in the Saskatoon area, there are many more that haven’t come forward in that area and there are many more that wanted to come forward but were too traumatized to,” Boyer says. “There’s many more that have buried those memories.”Alisa Lombard, an associate with Maurice Law — a firm leading the proposed class action — says women from outside Saskatoon Health Region have also reported being sterilized without proper and informed consent. She says she’s heard from others in Saskatchewan as well as Manitoba, Ontario and Alberta.Records and research show the practice was prevalent in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut as well, she adds.Lombard says her firm will raise the issue of coerced sterilizations of Indigenous women at the UN Committee Against Torture this month.In its submission to the committee, Lombard’s firm calls out provincial and federal authorities for not investigating and punishing those responsible for the practice despite having received “numerous reports of numerous cases of forced sterilization.”It also outlines specific steps to combat the practice, including criminalizing forced sterilization through the Criminal Code and having Health Canada issue guidance to health professionals regarding sterilization procedures.“I think any and all attention brought to such egregious human-rights breaches is not only necessary, but it ought to be expected,” Lombard says. “I think upon any kind of inkling that something this terrible is happening, that it is reported and the fact it is reported by so many women … I think our governments have an obligation to look into it deeply and to fix it, mostly importantly.”Canada must ensure the practice stops, says Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott, with policies, education and awareness-raising.“The issue of forced sterilization of vulnerable people, including Indigenous women, is a very serious violation of human rights,” she says, noting it has gone on in Canada for a long time.She also calls what happened to Liz “absolutely appalling and reprehensible.”“The story that you’re telling where not only was apprehension being threatened … that she was forced into not only giving up the baby she was carrying but give up her future unborn children, is frankly a horrifying concept,” Philpott says.Liz remains haunted by what has stolen from her. Sometimes she hears her baby in her sleep.“I’ve had a few dreams … where you could hear a baby crying or you could have a sense of a baby,” she says. “The first time I had it I didn’t know if it was a boy or a girl. And then another time I had it, it was a boy.”She says it took years before she understood that what happened wasn’t her fault.“You say to yourself, ‘I deserve this, this is my sacrifice, this is my cross to bear’.”—Follow @kkirkup on TwitterKristy Kirkup, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgCALGARY — A judge is giving final instructions to jurors in the trial for a man accused of killing a Calgary woman and her young daughter in 2016.Edward Downey is charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of 34-year-old Sara Baillie and five-year-old Taliyah Marsman.Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Beth Hughes says jurors must not be influenced by public opinion and must ignore comments they heard from the courtroom gallery during the emotional three-week trial.The Crown’s theory is that Downey believed Baillie influenced her best friend to break up with him and to decline to work as an escort.The Crown argued Baillie’s daughter was a witness who needed silencing.  Downey testified he was in Baillie’s apartment the day she was found dead, but that he was there to buy cocaine from two other men, not hurt anyone.“You must consider the evidence and make your decision on a rational and fair consideration of all the evidence, and not on passion, or sympathy, or prejudice against the accused, the Crown or anyone else connected with the case,” Hughes told jurors Wednesday.Loved ones of the victims often wept as they heard graphic evidence during the trial and there were some emotional outbursts.“Any comments from the public gallery are inappropriate and must be ignored. Your duty as jurors is to assess the evidence impartially.”The trial heard Baillie was found dead in a laundry hamper in her daughter’s closet the evening of July 11, 2016, with duct tape wrapped around her face, neck and wrists. Taliyah was gone.The girl’s remains were found in some bushes east of the city three days later.The trial heard both died by asphyxiation.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgMONTREAL — An arbitrator says the firing last summer of Thomas Harding, the train engineer involved in the Lac-Megantic rail disaster, was illegal. He won’t be returning to work, but he will get financial compensation.Harding was acquitted in January 2018 of criminal negligence causing death.He returned to work for Central Maine and Quebec Railway, which took over from the defunct Montreal Maine & Atlantic that operated the line at the time of the derailment. Harding went on sick leave and was supposed to gradually return to work as of July 5, 2018, but on June 27 he received a letter of dismissal.The employer cited his involvement in the Lac-Megantic derailment and said the relationship of trust had been broken.Harding’s union filed a grievance, denouncing the fact his employer did not investigate the situation, as required under the collective agreement. Last week the arbitrator agreed and nullified the firing.The engineer became the public face of the Lac-Megantic disaster after it was revealed he didn’t apply sufficient hand brakes on the oil-laden convoy before retiring for the night.The train began rolling downhill in the early hours of July 6, 2013. It barrelled into the town, derailed and exploded, killing 47 people and destroying part of the downtown.The union asked that Harding be reinstated, but the arbitrator said that considering the circumstances a financial compensation was more appropriate. The amount has not been determined.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgSURREY, B.C. — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says the prime minister damaged the integrity of Canada’s immigration system when he tweeted two years ago that Canadians will welcome all those fleeing persecution, terror and war.Scheer was asked about illegal immigration today at a town hall in suburban Vancouver held by the Surrey Board of Trade, where audience members applauded his response.He says people crossing the U.S. border into Canada outside regular checkpoints are “jumping the queue” and causing longer wait times for refugees and immigrants going through traditional channels.The federal government says 34,854 refugee claims were made by irregular border crossers between February 2017 and September 2018 and of those 3,142 — or nine per cent — have been accepted.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently warned people to be wary of fear-mongering about immigration, suggesting the issue will be a hot-button topic during the federal election campaign this fall.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA — Canada’s trade minister says the government is expecting Canadian business interest in China to slow amid significant tensions between the two countries.However, Jim Carr also says he is confident Canada and China will eventually work through their differences, allowing economic ties between the two Pacific nations to flourish once again.Carr says his confidence is based on the long and complex trading relationship between Canada and China, which has continued in spite of what he described as a “difficult period.”Ottawa and Beijing have been locked in a diplomatic dispute since the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver last month at the request of the United States.After her arrest, China detained two Canadians on allegations of engaging in activities that endangered the country’s national security, and sentenced another Canadian to death for drug-smuggling.American authorities formally requested Meng’s extradition to the U.S. last month, and her case is due back in a Vancouver court in March.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) – The list of Canada’s Greenest Employers has been released and a Calgary school has made the cut.The University of Calgary has joined a prestigious group of Canadian employers recognized for their environmental awareness through various sustainability initiatives.The competition evaluates companies on a variety of criteria including the environmental initiatives they have developed; successes in reducing the organization’s environmental footprint and whether sustainability initiatives link to the employer’s public identity.Congratulations to the 2019 winners of Canada’s Greenest Employers! As national leaders in #sustainability, this year’s #GreenEmployers are setting new standards for mitigating environmental impacts of their operations. Learn more by visiting https://t.co/ZEiVjdsX8n #environment pic.twitter.com/mHy6SIA2pR— CT100 Project (@top_employers) April 15, 2019Some of those initiatives from the University include its Bike Root along with the UBike on-campus rental service, bicycle repair and maintenance clinics.The school also offers a 61-plot pesticide free community garden which is available for staff, students, and members of the community.“We strive to implement programs and initiatives that support a sustainability culture on campus and in the community,” says Associate Vice-President of Sustainability, Joanne Perdue. “This includes our commitment to advancing sustainability education and research, engagement for sustainability, and modelling the way through sustainability practices in administration and operations.”Several other post-secondary schools were named among the Greenest Employers in the country including the University of Alberta, Wilfred Laurier and McGill.Major companies such as the Home Depot, IKEA and Ivanhoe Cambridge which manages CrossIron Mills also made the list.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he has more work to do to sell Canadians on his vision for more action to fight climate change.Speaking at the annual meeting of the Canadian Teachers’ Federation in Ottawa Thursday, Trudeau says it’s clear most Canadians deeply care about the environment and want measures to protect it.But this desire hasn’t always translated to voting in governments that will take strong action on climate change, he said.He pointed to the election of “climate-denying” governments across the country over the past few years.Trudeau said his government will do much more on the environment, but emphasized the importance of “bringing Canadians along.”The prime minister said progress had been made on many fronts during his mandate, including the environment, but that the election of a Conservative government this fall would turn the country in the opposite direction.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgMore than 90 days after hundreds of schoolgirls were kidnapped by Boko Haram rebels in north-eastern Nigeria, a United Nations envoy for the region got a first-hand account of the efforts underway to rescue the students and to fight terrorism in the region, and met with education activist Malala Yousafzai, who was spending her birthday in Nigeria to show solidarity with the girls and their families.In Abuja, Said Djinnit, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for West Africa, reiterated “the continued commitment of the United Nations to the unity and stability of Nigeria,” according to the UN Office for West Africa (UNOWA).He held consultations with Government officials and the leadership of the National Assembly, as well as heads of defense and security services, to review progress made in efforts to rescue the schoolgirls seized on 14 April in Chibok, and to address the larger crisis resulting from Boko Haram activities.During the five-day visit, Mr. Djinnit also confirmed that the UN has started to implement an integrated support package that includes support for the Chibok girls, their families and their communities, in particular with psycho-social counselling and helping them reintegrate with their families and communities.While in Nigeria, Mr. Djinnit discussed the support package with Ms. Yousafzai, who was spending her 17th birthday in the country by “standing with my Nigerian sisters and their parents.”Ms. Yousafzai, whose Malala Fund reportedly donated $200,000 for education in Nigeria, offered to partner with the UN efforts to mitigate the impacts of the abduction and help the girls return to school.Citing examples of young female students being raped and killed in India, and forced into child marriage in Pakistan, Ms. Yousafzai called on the international community to protect girls around the world. “No child anywhere ever should be the target of conflict or violence,” she said.Turning to the armed group responsible for the mass kidnapping in Nigeria, Ms. Yousafzai had harsh words about their interpretation of Islam.“Stop misusing the name of Islam. Islam is a religion of peace. Islam allows every boy and every girl to get an education,” she spoke to applause. “I would request you lay down your weapons, release your sisters.”The Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban for attending classes said she can relate to the Nigerian students.“This Malala Day is a day for education of every child, and is dedicated to my dear, dear and dear Nigerian sisters who are going through the same brutal situation which I suffered through in my past,” she said in reference to the unofficial holiday first marked on 12 July 2013, her 16th birthday.last_img read more

first_imgJessica and Jerry Seinfeld hosted the Baby Buggy Summer Dinner, in partnership with Vanity Fair and supported by Giorgio Armani, at their home in the Hamptons on July 26.Scott Disick, Kourtney Kardashian and Jessica Seinfeld Attend Baby Buggy Summer DinnerCredit/Copyright: BFAAmong the guests were Alec Baldwin, Rachel Zoe, Roger Berman, Kourtney Kardashian, Scott Disick, Nacho Figueras, Delfina Blaquier, Ali Wentworth, George Stephanopoulos, Alina Cho, and Atlanta de Cadenet Taylor.Hilaria and Alec BaldwinCredit/Copyright: BFABaby Buggy, founded by Jessica Seinfeld in 2001, is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing families in need with essential equipment, products, clothing, and services for their infants and children up to age 12. With an extensive network of community-based organizations across the country, Baby Buggy has donated more than 7.3 million items to thousands of children.Rachel Zoe and Roger BermanCredit/Copyright: BFAlast_img read more

first_imgTwo music legends — Neil Young and Willie Nelson — will perform a benefit concert on Sept. 27 on a farm near Neligh, Nebraska that is on the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and also crosses the historic Ponca Tribe “Trail of Tears.”Proceeds from the “Harvest the Hope” concert will go to Bold Nebraska, the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Cowboy & Indian Alliance, to fund the ongoing fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, as well as a number of small, community-based clean energy projects on farms and tribal land. The afternoon concert will take place in a field on a farm owned by a family who are part of a strong collective of Nebraska landowners refusing to sell their land to TransCanada for the Keystone XL (KXL) pipeline.Also performing will be Native American hip-hop artist Frank Waln, and the “Stopping the Pipeline Rocks All-Stars,” some of the local Nebraska artists who recorded the benefit album in the solar-powered barn built inside the path of the Keystone XL pipeline last summer.“Harvest the Hope” Concert tickets will go on sale the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 20. Find out more here.last_img read more

first_imgPamela Anderson has sent a letter to Gov. Jerry Brown urging him to slash the budget and combat the drought by cutting meat from the menus of state prisons — and offering to serve lunch to inmates as she did at a vegetarian jail in Arizona.“As a resident of Los Angeles, I’m proud of your admirable prison reform efforts, designed to reduce the rate of mass incarceration,” she wrote. “Over the past three years, they’ve inspired other states to follow California’s lead. I have a suggestion that dovetails nicely with the progress that you’ve made so far while also addressing the state’s budget and water crises. Since California has more than 127,000 inmates, you could save taxpayers about $4.3 million a year and greatly improve the health of the prisoners by switching to nutritious vegan meals in correctional facilities.“These huge tax savings are based on the $273,000 in reduced costs reported by the Maricopa County Jail in Arizona, when it switched to all-vegetarian food for its 8,000 inmates. Last year, I went there with representatives of PETA to serve lunch to the prisoners and can report that they were impressed by the freshness and quality of the food. Beans, rice, lentils, pasta, potatoes and other vegetables, and oranges and other fruits have all the nutrients that a person needs but at a fraction of the cost of meats and cheeses. If California follows Arizona’s lead in switching to meat-free meals in prisons, I’d be happy to inaugurate the program by helping cook lunch and serve it to inmates.“By taking meat off the menu in all 33 state-run prisons, you’d be dramatically reducing the amount of water used to produce prisoners’ meals. It takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce just 1 pound of meat. I recently posed for this ad for PETA in order to draw attention to the meat and dairy farms that drain half our country’s water.“It’s heartening to know that you’re improving the state’s prison system. I hope you use this suggestion as one way of achieving that end while also addressing the budget and water crises. PETA and I would be happy to work with your team in order to create a low-cost meal plan for your correctional facilities, as we did in Arizona. I hope to have the opportunity to help you launch it.”last_img read more

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement I’ve always felt, also, that our show kind of transcends the genre. The conceit is sci-fi, but it focuses more on the human aspect, what it is to be human, what is it to be an individual; how do you exist as an individual in a system that seeks to commodify you? We’re lucky that we’ve hit onto something in that balance.Your performance seems as though you’re asking, “What does it mean to be 11 humans?” If someone is eliminated, for instance—being trained by years of television viewing—one’s first thought is, “Who are they going to get to replace that actor?” BBC America’s acclaimed sci-fi series Orphan Black rests on the shoulders of series star Tatiana Maslany. Ostensibly a story about a shadowy corporate monolith and the consequences of illegal human cloning, in the details, it’s a character study focused largely on a set of identical female clones—11 of them by the end of Season 4—all of which are played by Maslany. Her uncanny ability to play every character so distinctly that it can feel to viewers like separate actresses in each part has won widespread acclaim and a passionate fan base drawn as much by her performance as by the show’s depiction of people from all walks of life, and various sexual orientations.This being your second Emmy nomination for the role, the interesting thing is that it’s for an often overlooked genre—sci-fi. What are your thoughts on being recognized, along with the show itself, by the Television Academy?We’re really lucky to get this recognition because I do think there’s a stigma around science fiction. But so many shows that are science fiction speak about the world in a way that’s really subversive, and I think that TV is changing in general, that the stigma about television is changing. It’s really open to more complicated storytelling, and the structure of it allows for a lot of in-depth character progression and exploration. We’re just lucky that we’ve made any kind of splash—especially because right now, television is so strong. Facebook Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement It all started two weeks ago with Internet comedian Shiggy, who shared a video of himself dancing to “In My Feelings” with his 1.4 million Instagram followers. It quickly caused the distinctive dance to go viral, with fans asking “Kiki, do you love me?” from Drake’s lyrics in the hit song and resulted in its own hashtag, #DoTheShiggy. Twitter Drake’s single “In My Feelings” has hit number one – the Toronto rapper’s third track this year to hit that lofty chart position – and Champagne Papi is giving credit where credit is due, by thanking the originator of a new dance challenge that helped propel the song up the charts. Advertisement Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter Former Motive star Lauren Holly and Benjamin Watson (The L.A. Complex) are set for key recurring roles opposite Kiefer Sutherland on the upcoming third season of Designated Survivor on Netflix.In season 3 of Designated Survivor, produced by eOne, President Kirkman (Sutherland) will face a political reality… campaigning. What does it take to make a leader? What price will he be willing to pay? This season will explore today’s world of campaigning, smear tactics, debates, campaign finance and “fake news.” Democracy, as we know it, will hang in the balance.last_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsQuebec Premier Jean Charest’s Plan Nord is getting a lukewarm reception in some Aboriginal communities in the province.On Monday, Charest launched his ambitious 25-year project to develop northern parts of Quebec where 27 per cent of the population is Aboriginal.Some Aboriginal communities, however, feel that plans for the development of their traditional lands pose some political problems.APTN National News reporter Danielle Rochette explains.last_img