first_imgTwo music legends — Neil Young and Willie Nelson — will perform a benefit concert on Sept. 27 on a farm near Neligh, Nebraska that is on the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and also crosses the historic Ponca Tribe “Trail of Tears.”Proceeds from the “Harvest the Hope” concert will go to Bold Nebraska, the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Cowboy & Indian Alliance, to fund the ongoing fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, as well as a number of small, community-based clean energy projects on farms and tribal land. The afternoon concert will take place in a field on a farm owned by a family who are part of a strong collective of Nebraska landowners refusing to sell their land to TransCanada for the Keystone XL (KXL) pipeline.Also performing will be Native American hip-hop artist Frank Waln, and the “Stopping the Pipeline Rocks All-Stars,” some of the local Nebraska artists who recorded the benefit album in the solar-powered barn built inside the path of the Keystone XL pipeline last summer.“Harvest the Hope” Concert tickets will go on sale the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 20. Find out more here.last_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – Amazon is keeping the cost of an annual Prime membership in Canada steady even as it moves to raise the cost in the United States.The online retailer says the price of an annual membership will remain at $79 even as it increases 20 per cent in the U.S. starting next month.The company said Thursday that Prime members in the U.S. will now pay US$119 a year, up from US$99, starting May 11 for new members.The new price will apply to renewals of existing U.S. memberships starting on June 16.An Amazon Prime membership gives customers free two-day shipping as well as access to its video and music streaming services and other benefits.The online retailer recently disclosed for the first time that it has more than 100 million Prime members worldwide.last_img read more

CALGARY — TransCanada Corporation (TSX:TRP) is giving customers an extra month to sign up for space on its Keystone pipeline system due to flooding from hurricane Harvey in Houston and other parts of the U.S. Gulf Coast.The company launched its open season in July to solicit binding commitments for transportation of an additional 225,000 barrels of crude oil per day on the Keystone and Keystone XL pipelines from Alberta to the market hub in Oklahoma, and on to the U.S. Gulf Coast.The deadline has now been extended to Oct. 26 from the original Sept. 28.The last remaining regulatory barrier to the Keystone XL pipeline resides with Nebraska but the company has said going ahead with construction is also conditional on receiving sufficient commercial support. read more

Valley Heights alums will voyage far and wide for a special reunion in June.Like Robert Kelle for example. A member of the VHSS Rockin’ 80s organizing committee, Kelle and his wife Cassie (formerly Crabb) will fly in from Orange County, California for the weekend festivities.“There are some folks that we’re talking to who are in Europe and Asia that are maybe coming back as well,” Robert pointed out. “We’re trying to get everyone we can.”The June 21-23 reunion won’t come on a specific anniversary but to honour those lost since the 1980s.The ball got rolling after Daryle Gaston, a popular Valley Heights Secondary School grad, died last year.“A small group of us wanted to get together and have a memorial and we said ‘it shouldn’t be about just one person’ so we started to do the numbers on how many people have actually passed away,” explained volunteer Peter McDowell.The group found that over 100 former classmates, teachers and VHSS staff members are gone – and a memorial service will be held during the weekend, as well as an open house allowing alums to catch up and share memories made at the campus. They’re doing so with the blessing of VHSS principal and alum Alison High.“We don’t want to keep losing people and not have had contact with them,” said Kelle. “We’re all connected on social media so easily now, but when is the last time we all got together in a room? I don’t bump into Valley Heights alumni every day like others do.”The weekend kicks off on the Friday evening with a reception and happy hour at New Limburg Brewery in Nixon from 5-10 p.m. The main event dinner and dance goes at the Delhi German Home from 5 p.m.-1 a.m. a night later.During his years in southern California, Kelle has created two non-profits that host upwards of 30 events a year. He’s teamed with six others – Wanda Backus Kelly, Jerry Causier, Michael Chwastiak, April Crabb, Rob McCready, and Carolyn Oatman-Rouillard – in helping host the VHSS festivities, which they hope will showcase Norfolk County to those living outside the region.“We want to shed a light on what’s happened in Norfolk in the last 30 years,” Kelle added. “We’re coming home to a region that, when we went to school, was a huge tobacco region and there’s been a lot of diversification that’s happened since then.”Some other events are also in the works, like a car show and scavenger hunt that could be held on the Saturday.Any proceeds will be donated back to the school in the form of a bursary or scholarship. A contribution will also be made to the Canadian Mental Health Association.The event isn’t about money though – organizers are more concerned about facilitating great times with old friends.“We’re getting excited about it,” said Kelle. “Events aren’t that difficult but we do need some effort and some help… it’s always going to be a mad scramble at the end, but we’ll pull it together.”For more information on the event, visit vhss80s.com. read more

Up to a third of the world’s people do not meet their physical and intellectual potential because of vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and without urgent action to fortify and supplement foods children in developing nations will remain at risk of underachieving, according to a new United Nations report released today. “The overwhelming scope of the problem makes it clear that we must reach out to whole populations and protect them from the devastating consequences of vitamin and mineral deficiency,” UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director Carol Bellamy said of the report jointly published by her agency and The Micronutrient Initiative, a not-for-profit organization based in Ottawa, Canada. Unless action against vitamin and mineral deficiencies moves to a new level, the UN will not achieve its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of eradicating extreme poverty, improving maternal health and reducing child mortality by two-thirds by 2015, the report concludes. The severe effects of vitamin and mineral deficiencies, such as anaemia, cretinism and blindness, have long been known, but the report sheds new light on other problems caused by less extreme deficiencies, such as a lack of iron which impairs intellectual development in young children and lowers national IQs. Other problems include vitamin A deficiency, compromising the immune systems of approximately 40 per cent of children under five in the developing world and leading to the deaths of 1 million youngsters each year, and iodine deficiency in pregnancy, which causes as many as 20 million babies a year to be born mentally impaired. The report calls for the food industry to develop, market and distribute low-cost fortified food products and supplements, and for governments to control vitamin and mineral deficiency through education and legislation. Methods that have worked in industrialized nations are now so inexpensive and available that they could control vitamin and mineral deficiencies worldwide, Ms. Bellamy said. These include adding essential vitamins and minerals to regularly consumed foods and providing children and women of childbearing age with vitamin and mineral supplements. “With nearly a third of the planet affected in some way by a problem for which a clear solution exists, anything less than rapid progress is unconscionable,” UNICEF Deputy Executive Director Kul Gautam said in launching the report in New York. read more

“In this regard, its programmes in nuclear technology, safety, security and verification constitute the unique tools that help build a better world for all people,” the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) says in its Annual Report for 2004, released today. “What is needed is continued global cooperation. For the Agency, this cooperation is the key to harnessing nuclear energy in the service of development and peace.” The report highlights all aspects of the 138-Member-State agency’s work in the past year, as well as prospects for future developments. “Global nuclear developments in 2004, such as the changing outlook for nuclear power, the increasing role of nuclear applications in global sustainable development initiatives, greater international cooperation in matters of safety and security, and the increasing recognition of the need to strengthen the nuclear non-proliferation regime, have created new challenges and opportunities for the Agency,” it says. It notes that security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated technologies has taken on heightened significance in recent years. “However, while nuclear security is and should remain a national responsibility, some countries still lack the programmes and the resources to respond properly to the threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism. For these countries, international cooperation is essential to help them strengthen their national capacities,” it says. “International cooperation is also essential for the Agency’s efforts to assist in building regional and global networks for combating transnational threats,” it adds, stressing that its nuclear security plan is founded on measures to guard against thefts of nuclear and other radioactive material and to protect related facilities against sabotage. In this regard, the Agency has been assisting States in training customs officials, installing better equipment at border crossings, and ensuring that information on trafficking incidents is shared effectively. Since 1993, over 650 confirmed incidents of trafficking in nuclear or other radioactive material have been recorded. In 2004 alone, 121 such incidents were reported, 11 of which involved nuclear material – the highest number of incidents confirmed to the Agency in a single year since 1993. Other points in the report include: The implementation of comprehensive safeguards agreements and additional protocols remains crucial for preventing clandestine nuclear weapons programmes.There is clearly a sense of rising expectations for nuclear energy. Near term projections released in 2004 based on the most conservative assumptions predict the equivalent of 127 more 1000 megawatt nuclear plants than the 2000 projection.The ageing of the nuclear work force is a serious concern for a number of Member States, particularly those where nuclear expansion has slowed or is being reversed by phase-out policies, and new talent must be recruited to replace retirees. New recruits are also needed in countries that are planning to expand the use of nuclear power. read more

US economic growth slowed to 1.5 pct. annual rate in 2nd quarter as consumer spending weakened by Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Jul 27, 2012 6:13 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – High unemployment isn’t going away — not as long as the economy grows as slowly as it did in the April-June quarter.Weak consumer spending held growth to an annual rate of just 1.5 per cent, even less than the 2 per cent rate in the first quarter. And few expect the economy to accelerate in the second half of the year as Europe’s financial woes and a U.S. budget crisis restrain businesses and consumers.The growth estimate Friday from the government suggested that the U.S. economy could be at risk of stalling three years after the recession ended. Economists generally say even 2 per cent annual growth would add only about 90,000 jobs a month. That’s too few to keep up with population growth and drive down the unemployment rate, which is stuck at 8.2 per cent.The figures came in the Commerce Department’s quarterly report on gross domestic product. GDP measures the country’s total output of goods and services, from the purchase of a cup of coffee to the sale of fighter jets.“The main takeaway from today’s report, the specifics aside, is that the U.S. economy is barely growing,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief economic strategist at BTIG LLC. “It’s no wonder the unemployment rate cannot move lower.”Sal Guatieri, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, expects the unemployment rate to end this year — and next year — at 8.3 per cent. He said he foresees no decline in unemployment because of how tepid he thinks economic growth will remain: 2.2 per cent for all of 2012 and 2 per cent for 2013.Stocks rose as investors shrugged off the sluggish U.S growth and focused instead on pledges from European leaders to preserve the union of the 17 countries that use the euro. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up more than 187 points. Broader indexes also jumped.The lacklustre economy is raising pressure on President Barack Obama in his re-election fight with Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. But few think the Fed, the White House or Congress can or will do anything soon that might rejuvenate the economy quickly. Many lawmakers, for example, refuse to increase federal spending in light of historically large budget deficits.No president since Franklin D. Roosevelt, in the depths of the Great Depression, has been re-elected when the unemployment rate exceeded 8 per cent. Presidents Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush were ousted when unemployment was well below 8 per cent.Polls show that management of the economy is the only issue on which those surveyed express more confidence in Romney, with his business background, than Obama.Glenn Hubbard, economic adviser for Romney, said Friday’s report largely matched economists’ expectations.“But those expectations themselves and the report itself were actually quite disappointing,” Hubbard said. “At that pattern, the economy simply will never return to full employment.”Alan Krueger, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, noted that the report showed the economy grew for the 12th straight quarter. Still, Congress could strengthen growth and job creation by adopting Obama’s plan to extend expiring tax cuts for all except the wealthiest Americans, Krueger said.Republicans want the tax cuts extended for all Americans.The 1.5 per cent growth rate in the second quarter was the weakest since GDP grew at a 1.3 per cent rate in the July-September quarter last year. And it shows the recovery is gaining no momentum.After shrinking 3.1 per cent in 2009 in the midst of the recession, the economy grew 2.4 per cent in 2010. Last year, growth slowed to 1.8 per cent — roughly the same meagre pace at which the economy expanded in the first half of this year.Even in normal times, such growth rates are subpar. They’re especially weak for a recovery that follows a deep recession, when growth is typically much stronger than average.Annual economic growth of 2.5 per cent to 3 per cent is needed to create enough jobs just to keep up with an expanding workforce. Healthier growth of 4 per cent or more is needed to reduce the unemployment rate significantly.The government makes three estimates of GDP for each quarter. Each revision is based on more complete economic data.The sluggish growth rate could make the Federal Reserve more likely to announce some new step after it meets next week. But Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics, doubts the Fed will act at the July 31-Aug. 1 meeting.Many economists instead think the Fed will launch another round of bond buying at its September policy meeting. The aim would be to drive long-term interest rates lower and encourage more borrowing and spending.In the second quarter, GDP in current dollars rose at an annual rate of $117.6 billion to $15.6 trillion.Growth was weaker mostly because consumer spending slowed to a growth rate of just 1.5 per cent. That was down from 2.4 per cent in the first quarter.Americans bought fewer autos, computers and other long-lasting manufactured goods. But money spent on services, which represents about two-thirds of spending, rose in the April-June quarter.As they spent less, Americans also saved more. The savings rate reached 4 per cent, up from 3.6 per cent in the first quarter.The savings rate reached a low of 1.5 per cent in 2005, a year when soaring home prices made consumers feel less need to save. The rate climbed to 5.4 per cent in 2008 as the financial crisis and recession squeezed Americans.Nigel Gault, chief U.S. economist at IHS Global Insight, said consumer spending will likely remain subdued in the second half of the year. He thinks it will grow at or below a 2 per cent annual rate.Gas prices have stopped falling and have even started to rise in recent weeks. And this summer’s severe drought is expected to push food prices up toward the end of the year.“There is really no reason to see us pulling out of this malaise any time soon,” Gault said. “I am not calling for a recession, but I am calling for weak growth.”The U.S. economy has never been so sluggish this long into a recovery. The Great Recession officially ended in June 2009.Until a few weeks ago, many economists had been predicting that growth would accelerate in the final six months of the year. They pointed to gains in manufacturing, home and auto sales and lower gas prices.But threats to the U.S. economy have left consumers too anxious to spend freely. Jobs are tight. Pay isn’t keeping up with inflation. Retail sales fell in June for a third straight month. Manufacturing has weakened in most areas of the country.Fear is also growing that the economy will fall off a “fiscal cliff” at year’s end. That’s when tax increases and deep spending cuts will take effect unless Congress reaches a budget agreement.All that is making companies reluctant to expand and hire much.The Commerce Department also revised its growth estimates for the past three years. Those revisions showed that the economy contracted 3.1 per cent in 2009, slightly less than the 3.5 per cent previously reported. Growth in 2010 was put at 2.4 per cent, down from 3 per cent, with growth in 2011 at 1.8 per cent instead of 1.7 per cent.___Associated Press Staff Writers Christopher S. Rugaber, Paul Wiseman and Tom Raum contributed to this report. read more

first_imgBoliden has installed four trolley assist truck units at its Aitik copper mine in Sweden as the company looks to step up its vision for fossil fuel-free operations, the company’s Technology Director, Staffan Sandström told attendees at Epiroc’s Power Change Days event in Örebro, Sweden, this week.The trolley kits, supplied by Caterpillar, are running on Cat 795F haul trucks on a trolley assist line as part of a two-year trial project at Europe’s largest open-pit copper mine.For the project, Boliden has joined forces with Eitech and ABB to supply electrical infrastructure; Pon Equipment and Caterpillar for truck modifications; and Chalmers University with supporting research on system aspects of the electrification. The project is supported by the Swedish Energy Agency and has seen an investment in a 10 MW capacity DC substation.The aim is to examine the possibility of replacing elements of Aitik’s transport system with electrified trucks. The objective is to be able to move the majority of the 70 million or so tonnes of rock transported at the open pit each year entirely without the use of fossil fuel.At the event this week, Sandström confirmed the first trolley line was commissioned in September and had been working well, showing a close to two times increase in speed on an incline when compared with the equivalent diesel trucks.The real test for the trucks and trolley line was yet to come, he said.“This is nothing new; it has been done before. The new thing here is going to be working in 40° below [freezing],” he said.The project’s Technical Manager, Jonas Ranggård, made a similar remark recently in a Boliden press release, saying: “As we want to be able to use the electrified routes in all weather conditions year-round, the pilot project as a whole can only first be evaluated at the end of 2019/start of 2020.”Rikard Mäki, Project Manager for the R&D project, told IM the company was already preparing for these conditions.“Road maintenance impact is one of the parameters that will be evaluated in the pilot project in order for us to accurately take this factor into account as part of the following investment decisions. We have fitted one motor grader and a wheel loader with machine guidance systems in order to maintain correct flatness, target slope and height of the ramp.”On the trolley assist technology, Sandström continued: “Today, it works very well and roughly 30% of all transport has potential to be used on the trolley line at Aitik,” he said, adding it could have wider applications at the company’s Kevitsa nickel-copper mine in Finland.Boliden said the first Aitik trolley line is around 700 m long and is expected to save some 830 m³/y of diesel. This should help the company reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80% along those routes where the technology can be implemented.In addition to the emission benefits brought to both the wider community and those operating in the mine, Sandström said the productivity and cost benefits (reducing the amount of diesel purchased) could also have a big impact.Mäki said: “We do see this technology as the most promising solution near term for both Kevitsa and Aitik in order to reduce fuel cost and emissions. Decision to move ahead with further extension of the system is pending results from the pilot test. The initial results are looking very positive and the operators are very engaged in the pilot test.”In other news, but still on haul trucks and potential electrification, Boliden confirmed in its September quarter results that, on October 19, the company reached agreement with Komatsu regarding the purchase of 17 haul trucks for Kevitsa and nine mine trucks for Aitik in an investment totalling some SEK 900 million ($99 million).The investment is being made against the background of the ongoing expansion, insourcing of transport and as a replacement for part of the existing fleet of trucks. Boliden said all of the trucks are equipped for future electrification and delivery will commence in mid-2019.last_img read more

first_imgTHE GARDA NATIONAL Drugs Unit (GNDU) arrested 61 people on suspicion of drug trafficking and seized nearly €32 million worth of drugs last year.The figure is revealed in the Garda Síochána annual report for 2013.The GNDU has overall primary responsibility for drug law enforcement in Ireland and is tasked with the investigation of drug trafficking insofar as this jurisdiction is concerned.Overall, gardaí recorded 15,405 controlled drugs offences last year.In 2013, the GNDU arrested 61 people in connection with drug trafficking offences with €31,940,000 of controlled drugs seized. This included cocaine, heroin, herbal cannabis, cannabis resin and ecstasy. Intotal, 73 significant seizures were made.These included the seizures of Operation Cogset, which nabbed €4.7 million worth of drugs in six seizures.However, Operation Nitrogen continues to be the flagship for the investigation of cannabis cultivation in Ireland.The number of cannabis plants seized has been steadily increasing over the last number of years, with €23 million worth of plants were seized in 2013.There were 28,851 cannabis plants seized during 2013 from a total of 394 “cultivation or manufacture incidents”.Gardaí also targeted mid and low-level dealers, arresting 83 dealers in connection with 192 criminal offences.Also in today’s report: More than 1,100 public complaints filed against gardaí last year >Air pistols and shotguns were the most seized firearms last year >Martin who? Callinan isn’t mentioned in opening of annual garda report >last_img read more

first_imgStay on target Study: People Who Use Emojis Have More Sex (Kinda)’Emoji House’ Feud Turns Calif. Neighborhood Pink With Rage Finally, the moment you’ve all waited for: More than 70 new emoji are coming soon to iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Mac.And while that’s not even half of the 157 icons rolled out this summer as part of Unicode’s 11.0 update, there is more than enough new material to colorfully express your thoughts.It is unclear right now which ones Apple passed up.But iDevice owners everywhere will be delighted to see new characters with red, grey, or curly hair (as well as those without any hair); more emotive smiley faces; and additional representation of animals, sports, and food.“Emoji are used by people all over the world to communicate,” Cupertino wrote in an update. “iOS 12.1 brings even more characters to the keyboard that better represent global users.”Aside from justice for gingers, you’ll find hot and cold faces; superheroes and supervillains (of both sexes); a llama, hippopotamus, peacock, and parrot; a mango; a chess pawn, and a pirate flag.The Unicode Consortium, meanwhile, put an emphasis on Asian culture, with pictures of mooncake, a Chinese baked good traditionally eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival; a red envelope, which typically signifies a monetary gift given during the holidays or special occasions; and the Nazar eye-shaped amulet, believed to protect against the evil eye.There is also a distinct nod to science and math, with images of a lab coat, microbe, test tube, petri dish, right-handed DNA, and an abacus.The new emoji are available now in the developer and public beta previews of iOS 12.1, and will launch as part of upcoming software updates to iOS, macOS, and watchOS.Unicode had already revealed 104 proposed candidates for a 2019 release; contenders include a yawning face, ballet shoes, a flamingo, an ice cube, a ringed planet, a kit, and a chair.There are also a handful of accessibility symbols: prosthetic arm and leg, ear with hearing aid, guide dog, wheelchair (manual and motorized), and probing cane.“Apple is working with the Unicode Consortium to add more disability-themed emoji to the keyboard for Unicode 12.0,” the company announced.Apple recently released a new lineup of smartphones and its next-gen Apple Watch. Read The iPhone X Can’t Have My Memoji Face and keep up to date on the trillion-dollar company here.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

first_imgMIAMI GARDENS, FLA. (WSVN) – An investigation is underway in Miami Gardens where a body was recovered after a vehicle was found nearly submerged in a canal, early Saturday morning.Police identified the victim as 33-year-old Willie Joe Johnson from Miami.According to Miami Gardens Police, officers discovered the vehicle after a resident reported hearing a large splash in the canal at 15th Avenue and Northwest 155th Street at around 3:30 a.m.Shortly after, fire rescue found the body of Johnson floating in the canal. Rescuers attempted to revive him, but Johnson was pronounced dead at Jackson North Medical Center , according to police.7News cameras rolled as the black four-door sedan was towed out of the canal, at around 8 a.m.It remains unknown as to how the car ended up in the canal.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

first_imgCOOPER CITY, FLA. (WSVN) – A teacher accused of molesting a student at a Broward County camp is facing more than a dozen new allegations of inappropriate behavior involving minors.Thirty-five-year-old Christopher Falzone returned to court Friday. He was charged with 14 new counts of lewd and lascivious molestation and sexual assault.The suspect is now back behind bars.Several students said Falzone, a math teacher, touched them inappropriately at Renaissance Charter School in Cooper City in 2017.Falzone was arrested last week, accused of doing the same to a young girl at Camp Live Oak, where he was a counselor.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

first_imgPassengers enjoy the scenery during a Sept. 3, 2015, fast ferry Chenega sailing between Sitka and Juneau. Sitka would lose most of its ferry service under a schedule based on a reduced budget proposed by Gov. Bill Walker. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Download AudioBudget cuts have already dramatically reduced Alaska Marine Highway sailings. And the recently-released spending plan for the next fiscal year calls for more. So, how does the ferry system fare in the governor’s budget? And will the Legislature make further cuts?State officials will soon release the final version of next summer’s ferry schedule.A draft, released in October, lays up four of the system’s 11 ships and further reduces sailings. And while there may be a few adjustments, officials say it will be largely unchanged.But Gov. Bill Walker’s budget doesn’t make it any worse.“The schedule we’re working on is in anticipation of what the governor’s proposed budget for FY-17 would be,” says marine highway spokesman Jeremy Woodrow.He says the budget proposes spending just over $142 million on the ferries in the fiscal year starting in July. That’s about 8 percent lower than this year and about 11 percent less than the previous year.But Woodrow says the cuts are not as deep as they sound. He says only about a third of the full, $13 million cut impacts operations.“The rest of those reductions come from a difference of last year’s budget being supplemented with excess fuel trigger money plus a one-time appropriation to allow the marine highway system to continue to run its schedule that was published the prior year,” he says.Overall, the budget funds about 300 weeks of sailings by the remaining ferries. That’s just shy of a 15 percent reduction.That’s what the governor wants. But it’s probably not what the Legislature will accept. Majority leaders say Walker should have proposed many more cuts across the operating budget.“I’m afraid it’s going to get a lot worse,” says Juneau Sen. Dennis Egan.He serves on his chamber’s Transportation Committee, as well as the panel that deals with the ferry system’s operating budget.“I know a lot of the legislators don’t understand what the Alaska Marine Highway System does. They understand that it gets their cars down here for the session. And that’s about all they understand,” he says.Egan, a Democrat, worries about far deeper cuts to the system’s budget and schedule.Sitka Sen. Bert Stedman, who sits on the same two committees, says this year’s cuts are already hurting the region’s economy.“The cuts are pretty substantial to start with and if the Legislature goes further, it’s going to be more detrimental,” he says.Stedman, a Republican, worries about Southcentral and Interior Alaska’s greater legislative power.“My concern is fairness within the marine highway and fairness across the state, that we don’t single out a couple of regions that end up with disproportional reductions. Clearly we haven’t shut down any highways in the Railbelt. And as far as I know, we have no plans on doing so,” he says.Last year, majority lawmakers proposed deep cuts in marine highway service. They included eliminating service to communities on the road system, which could have cut Haines, Skagway, Valdez, Whitter and Homer.Reductions in funding and sailings results in fewer jobs.But marine highway spokesman Woodrow says no one’s been laid off yet, because of turnover.“What’s happened to date is there hasn’t been anybody who’s wanted a job whose lost work, because there’s been enough positions available. What may happen in the future with less boats running, only time will tell,” he says.He says the ferry system employed close to 1,000 people in the 2014 fiscal year, the latest with totals available.last_img read more

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uFrom 5-7 P.M.More insights and reporting on the most vital political issues of the day, including the ongoing fallout from the election of Donald Trump. Tonight, special guest host: Dr. Kaye Wise Whitehead, author, public intellectual and Loyola University professor. These stories and much more on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes, Monday through Friday, 5-7 p.m.last_img

first_img Hello friends, are you really reading this?If you are, chances are you know about my friend Elliot Alderson too. And maybe you also happen to know about that shady Mr. Robot and the group he hangs with, fsociety. But I digress. Remember how we were all worried about him a few months ago? How he just…stopped talking to us?About that. Well, I got the answer sitting in my lap.Okay, okay. I’m just gonna trust you’re actually reading this and that we’re all on the same page. Yeah? Cool. Today, me and 349 of Elliot’s other ‘closest friends’ piled into BookCon at New York Comic Con to hear Mr. Robot creator and executive producer Sam Esmail and show writer Courtney Looney talk about the series’ first official tie-in book, MR. ROBOT: Red Wheelbarrow. (Also titled eps1.91_redwheelbarr0w.txt—a nod to the oh-so-l337 episode titles of the show).Elliot started out season 2 of Mr. Robot writing in a ratty old composition journal at his “mother’s house.” And now Esmail and Looney have decided to release Elliot’s journal to the public, and with it, the story of what he really got up to in the two months between season 1 and 2. You might think of it as a nifty promotional cash grab, but Esmail and Looney insisted that it’s a genuine part of the overarching Mr. Robot story and the key to decoding Elliot’s mental source code in Season 2.This isn’t Esmail’s first foray into creating standalone stories that expand the Mr. Robot universe. There’s also a 13-minute virtual reality experience and a mobile phone game, but this is a distinctly analog medium for a show so steeped in technology. The book itself looks like your typical composition journal—albeit one that’s been through a bit of wear and tear. Think of it as getting your hands on a prop from the show: The cover looks like it’s been burnt a bit, there are mysterious inserts like blank envelopes, as well as a card from Darlene, and a few NSFW pictures doodled in the margins of quite a few pages. The bulk of the book is filled with Elliot’s scribblings—in Rami Malek and Christian Slater’s actual handwriting!—as he vomits his thoughts onto the page, literally and figuratively.Not to spoil anything, but if you’re one of those diehard fans who spend hours analyzing each episode for clues, this book should tide you over until next year as Esmail and Looney have peppered hints about Season 3 onto its pages. The most obvious one is in the title ‘Red Wheelbarrow.’ And if that sounds familiar to you, it should. It’s the William Carlos Williams poem that Tyrell and Elliot bond over that Esmail says acts like a ‘codeword’ for Elliot and may play an important role next season. There’s also some new backstory as the book fleshes out Hot Carla, a pyromaniac inmate we got a glimpse at in Season 2, and her mysterious relationship with Elliot.But will reading this book change the way you view season 2 as a whole? Esmail definitely thinks so. “The way we construct the story or storytelling pattern, [it’s like] you’re standing this close to a painting, and you’re taking steps back,” says Esmail. “More things are filled in, and more things you thought you knew are recontextualized.”You can currently preorder the book, which will be available November 1 for $29.95. But if you find yourself wishing that you could hear Rami Malek’s dulcet tones read Elliot’s turbulent thoughts—you’re in luck. Esmail mentioned that an audiobook, also featuring Hot Carla, is in the works.Until then, I’m gonna suggest that we all close our eyes. Mind awake, body asleep. What to Stream on Amazon Prime This WeekendBest Shows to Stream on Amazon Prime Stay on targetlast_img read more

first_img More information: Dhagash Mehta et al. “Kinetic Transition Networks for the Thomson Problem and Smale’s Seventh Problem.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.028301 , Also at arXiv:1605.08459 [cond-mat.soft] This puzzle is the essence of Thomson’s problem, which asks how to arrange equal charges (such as electrons) on the surface of a sphere in a way that minimizes their electrostatic potential energy—the energy caused by all of the electrons repelling each other. According to Coulomb’s law, the total energy is inversely related to the sum of the distances between all possible pairs of charges, so the goal is to spread the charges as far apart as possible.This task is more difficult than it sounds—Thomson’s problem has been rigorously solved only for numbers of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 charges. In 1998, mathematician Steven Smale identified the problem of how to choose starting points close to the lowest-energy state (which makes it easier to solve Thomson’s problem) as the seventh problem on his list of 18 unsolved problems for the 21st century. Part of the reason why Thomson’s problem is so important is because its applications are so far-reaching. In 1904, J.J. Thomson originally proposed the model of charges on a sphere to describe the structure of an atom. Even though experiments disproved this “plum pudding model” long ago, the Thomson problem still has notable applications in chemistry (for understanding how electrons fill electron shells in atoms), biology (for determining the arrangements of proteins on the shells of spherical viruses), as well as in physics, computer science, and such practical applications as determining the optimal placement of communication satellites around the Earth. Spheres on treesNow in a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, a team of mathematicians, engineers, and scientists from the US, the UK, and Australia has taken a new approach to Thomson’s problem that makes it much easier to determine the lowest-energy configuration. For seven numbers of charges (every third number from 132 to 150), they have constructed tree-shaped disconnectivity graphs, where the vertical axis or “trunk” corresponds to the energy of a particular charge arrangement. Each “branch” terminates at a local minimum, which are the states that have lower energies than all of their neighboring states, and so they are candidates for the ultimate lowest energy state, the global minimum. By visualizing the problem in this way, the researchers noticed that these particular graphs don’t have lots of branches extending from lots of other branches. Instead, every branch connects to only a few other branches and then to the trunk at regularly spaced energy thresholds, so that the graph resembles a palm tree or single funnel structure.The researchers found that this “funneled potential energy landscape” is characteristic of a highly ordered structure and displays characteristics of a small-world network. As a result, it provides an important clue for finding the global minimum. It tells the researchers to start their optimization algorithms using the local minima because, in these networks, it turns out that every local minimum is always within 5-7 steps (branches) of the global minimum. This is true even for local minima that have much higher energies than the global minimum, and even when the total number of local minima is very large. (Phys.org)—How do you arrange a group of points on the surface of a sphere so that all the points are as far apart from each other as possible? With two points, the answer is easy: place them on opposite sides of the sphere, as if they are endpoints of the diameter. With three points, make them the vertices of an equilateral triangle, and so on. But as the number of points increases, so does the difficulty of the problem. By visualizing the problem from a new perspective, the researchers found that lower-energy configurations have more connections than higher-energy configurations do. Credit: Mehta et al. ©2016 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Spin glass physics with trapped ions © 2016 Phys.org The disconnectivity graph for 147 charges on a sphere has a structure-seeking “palm tree” organization. The five lowest minimum energy configurations are shown. Credit: Mehta et al. ©2016 American Physical Society Citation: Researchers chip away at Smale’s 7th unsolved problem in mathematics (2016, July 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-chip-smale-7th-unsolved-problem.html The disconnectivity graph reveals other information, such as that lower-energy local minima have more connections to other states than do higher-energy local minima. The researchers also discovered that the global minimum is always the most highly connected node in the entire network, making it the network’s central node. Implications for Thomson’s and Smale’s problemsUsing this insight from the network’s single-funneled, small-world structure, finding the global minimum for Thomson’s problem becomes much easier than before.”Our work looks at Smale’s seventh problem from a completely different perspective and sheds novel light on it,” coauthor Dhagash Mehta, at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Adelaide, told Phys.org. “In this work, methods developed by the theoretical chemistry community have helped understand a deep mathematical problem. Often it is the other way around.”As the researchers explain, it’s easier to solve Thomson’s problem in these particular cases than it is to solve Smale’s problem (of choosing good starting points). So although the results will likely be useful, they do not go very far toward solving Smale’s seventh problem.”I think ‘chip away’ is about right,” said coauthor David Wales at University Chemical Laboratories in Cambridge, UK. “There is no rigorous mathematical progress on the problem from an analytic point of view.”In the future, the researchers plan to extend this approach to larger numbers of charges. From earlier work, they expect that landscapes with more than 400 charges will start to display multiple funnels, so the small-world structure may disappear. “While we have only shown data for seven numbers, we have strong reasons to believe that the single funnel is a feature for numbers less than 150,” said coauthor Halim Kusumaatmaja at Durham University in Durham, UK. “For larger numbers, there will likely be multiple funnels. Nonetheless, the network analysis could still be exploited to help us quickly identify candidates for the global minimum.”Other lines of work include exploiting the small-world properties discovered here to improve other optimization algorithms and develop novel algorithms, as well as to incorporate weight and direction into these networks, which may provide additional insight into the Thomson problem.”The social network analogy for networks of minima of the Thomson problem will go further when we analyze other network properties of these networks of minima,” Mehta said. “Our results will also help in constructing novel algorithms to find the global minimum more efficiently by exploiting these network properties.” Explore furtherlast_img read more

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Adam Lambert | Photo: supplied eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) And almost 10 years since making his name on the hit show, Adam Lambert has revealed he’s still a ‘multi-dater’ – but hasn’t lost hope of finding ‘something significant and monogamous’ one day.Speaking to GSN, the handsome star admitted: ‘I haven’t been in a relationship for about five years. I’ve been working and traveling quite a bit so dating is temporary and transient.’‘What’s hard is attempting to see each other again’Opening up about looking for love on the road, the Ghost Town singer also added: ‘I could meet and really click with a special guy in whatever city I’m in for a few days, but then I have to continue to my next destination.Photo: The Original High‘What’s hard is attempting to see each other again – especially after just a first date.‘That’s a lot of expectation and pressure to place on someone. Flying to another country for a second date is understandably intimidating.’ Adam Lambert joined celeb dating app Raya, then this happenedHere’s what went down when Steve Grand met Elton John (and Adam Lambert)How to find love and sex as a gay or bisexual man after 50Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/adam-lambert-dating/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… He recently told The Guardian he had different guys he was trying to date cheering him on in the American Idol audience each week. He furthermore said: ‘I’m a multi-dater for now. My inner romantic always hopes that I could meet someone and it would grow into something significant and monogamous.’While speaking to The Guardian, Adam also opened up about dating and not addressing his sexuality during his runner up appearance on American Idol in 2009.[embedded content]‘I had a handful of different guys I was trying to date’‘People were saying: “You didn’t declare it on the show.” I didn’t, but I also didn’t realize that I needed to. I’d already come out.” [If] I’d been in a long-term relationship and had my partner in the audience every week it would have come up, but that wasn’t the case.‘In fact, I had a handful of different guys I was trying to date that I’d invite to the show on different weeks. I wasn’t consistent enough!’Earlier this year Adam revealed that he has tried out dating app for the stars, Raya, to no success.‘I’m on there. I’ve already done that one. I’ve come through it and I didn’t meet anyone!’ he laughed.Adam is currently in the UK for a series of concerts with the iconic band Queen.Amazing unseen photos of Freddie Mercury, Queen and Adam Lambert revealedlast_img read more

first_imgNews | October 29, 2010 Philips to Display Womens Healthcare Solutions at RSNA 2010 Technology | Artificial Intelligence | July 18, 2019 Paragon Biosciences Launches Qlarity Imaging to Advance FDA-cleared AI Breast Cancer Diagnosis System Paragon Biosciences LLC announced the launch of its seventh portfolio company, Qlarity Imaging LLC, which was founded… read more Related Content Qlarity Imaging’s software is used to assist radiologists in the assessment and characterization of breast lesions. Imaging features are synthesized by an artificial intelligence algorithm into a single value, the QI score, which is analyzed relative to a database of reference abnormalities with known ground truth. Image courtesy of Business Wire. News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more News | Mammography Reporting Software | July 26, 2019 Ikonopedia Releases Automated Combined Reporting Package at AHRA Ikonopedia showcased its recently released Automated Combined Reporting package and its entire suite of structured… read more IBM collected a dataset of 52,936 images from 13,234 women who underwent at least one mammogram between 2013 and 2017, and who had health records for at least one year prior to the mammogram. The algorithm was trained on 9,611 mammograms. Image courtesy of Radiology. News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Technology | Breast Biopsy Systems | July 24, 2019 Fujifilm Releases Tomosynthesis Biopsy Option for Aspire Cristalle Mammography System Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. recently expanded its breast imaging solutions with the launch of its… read more Feature | Artificial Intelligence | July 19, 2019 | Michal Chorev AI Models Predict Breast Cancer With Radiologist-level Accuracy Breast cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women, and the most commonly diagnosed cancer… read more Technology | Mammography Reporting Software | July 25, 2019 Hologic Partners With MagView to Develop Unifi EQUIP Solution Hologic announced a partnership with mammography information solutions provider MagView to develop Unifi EQUIP, an… read more News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). October 29, 2010 – At RSNA 2010, Philips is highlighting several breast care systems, including imaging for mammography, ultrasound, MR and PET/CT, supported by leading-edge information management.At the conference, the company will introduce the new advanced stereotactic option for MammoDiagnost DR. It allows for fast procedures with a minimum of image acquisitions which may lead to a lower X-ray dose. It also includes Unique image processing to help clinicians identify tiny microcalcifications and view breast tissue structures. A single-touch Eleva user interface allows clinicians to work faster and more confidently. The system is not available in North America.The iU22 breast ultrasound system combines several technologies to deliver crisp, high-definition images to help clearly distinguish between normal and abnormal tissue.Tissue aberration correction compensates for speed-of-sound variations to produce clear, detailed images even in women with dense or fatty breast tissue. Volume imaging with the VL 13-5 transducer provides clinicians with revealing information, including visualization of the C-plane. Clinicians can view target areas from any plane to better characterize the extent of breast masses. Elastography enables physicians to differentiate relative stiffness of tissue through sonographic examination using the L12-5 transducer and Advanced Breast tissue specific imaging (TSI) preset.Clinical studies suggest that MRI may be helpful in breast care, particularly in imaging high-risk patients. The Achieva MRI with Philips Elite Breast features:• MammoTrak dockable trolley support system includes breast coils that provide superb visualization of small lesions. • SmartExam Breast delivers excellent, reproducible image quality – even in cases of silicone implants or surgery.• DynaCAD Enterprise computer-aided imaging system lets clinicians access morphologic data and kinetic information to increase diagnostic confidence.Nuclear medicine imaging (scintimammography) is an excellent tool for breast cancer diagnosis in patients with dense breasts or with large, palpable abnormalities that cannot be imaged well with mammography or ultrasound. The Gemini TF Big Bore PET/CT System combines Brilliance CT Big Bore capabilities with PET performance, helping clinicians make more accurate diagnoses and assessments.The IntelliSpace Breast workstation features mammography, ultrasound and MRI studies to provide clinicians with a complete picture of multiple breast exams at a single workspace. Besides being multimodality, it’s also a multivendor workstation. It integrates MammoDiagnost VU, multimodality breast applications and DynaCAD on a single desktop. Philips multimodality image-management system gives clinicians instant access to mammography, ultrasound and MR breast images at a personalized, interoperable desktop. iSite PACS interfaces with existing networks. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more read morelast_img read more

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Gary Levine, M.D., president of the National Consortium of Breast Centers, predicts a future of personalized breast screening and addresses related challenges that will need to be addressed for successful implementation. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Information Technology View all 220 items Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Videos | Breast Imaging | March 27, 2014 Highlights of the 2014 NCoBC Meeting: Personalized Breast Screening Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

first_imgIt is expected that travellers from up to 180 countries will be able to apply and receive confirmation within a few days when considering travel to India, if new reforms are approved this week. India already issues visas on arrival to visitors from about a dozen countries, including Japan and Indonesia, however, visitors from countries such as the United States, Britain and France are currently unable to enjoy these privileges. Currently, tourists must queue up at local consulates to obtain visas and are often not informed of the success of their submissions for several weeks; a key deterrent for lots of travellers. If the reforms are approved, tourists would receive confirmation that their visa has been processed and accepted within three days of submission and be able to obtain them on arrival at any airport.center_img Source = ETB News The proposed reforms have been backed by India’s major intelligence agencies and a final decision will likely be made at a meeting later this week, the India Express reported.last_img read more