first_imgAs customers and the IT industry convene in Barcelona at Cisco Live this week, I think about our relationship with Cisco that spawned an incredibly significant industry almost a decade ago.Back in 2009, Dell EMC and Cisco established a unified vision for the modern data center. Our goal was to simplify IT infrastructure adoption and management to enable IT operations teams to focus on delivering new services to help their businesses drive competitive advantage and new revenue. This vision eventually led to today’s Dell EMC VxBlock, a first-of-its-kind converged infrastructure system.VxBlock Systems are built on Cisco UCS servers, Cisco Nexus switches, Cisco MDS switches, Dell EMC storage and data protection devices, and VMware vSphere hypervisor. According to a recent IDC survey, VxBlock Systems require 66% less operational effort than traditional systems, speed the application development lifecycle by 34%, and pay for themselves in an average of only eight months.¹We call these outcomes the “turnkey engineered system experience,” in large part, due to another innovation: the Release Certification Matrix for life cycle assurance. Today, the “RCM” regularly provides VxBlock users with pre-validated, interoperable firmware and hypervisor releases and patches for the entire technology stack. This eliminates hundreds of hours of tedious, risky operations that other technology stacks pose.2Continuing to innovate and to collaborate with Cisco, we extended the VxBlock turnkey experience to the entire data center with Vscale Architecture.With Vscale Architecture, shared resource pools of Cisco compute, Dell EMC storage and data protection are connected through the Vscale Fabric, which is a software-defined Cisco spine-leaf network. These “logical” converged systems are managed, supported and sustained with the same low OpEx, high availability and agility as a VxBlock System. Customers, such as Inovalon3, say that Vscale has created operational efficiencies enterprise-wide, beyond the scale of a single converged system.Building on nearly a decade of No. 1 leadership in converged infrastructure sales, we’ve collaborated with Cisco to continue making strides in our journey to the modern data center with the addition of new hardware and software that has made our converged infrastructure portfolio even stronger, faster, more powerful and more automated.Next Generation Cisco Compute for VxBlock SystemsOur family of VxBlock Systems (the 350, 540 and 740 models) now supports the powerful Cisco UCS B200 M5 Blade Servers. With the latest Intel Xeon Scalable processors, more cores per socket, up to 3TB of memory, and 24 DIMM slots, the M5 servers boost performance for compute-intensive workloads like virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), web infrastructure and enterprise applications such as Oracle and SAP HANA. With the B200 M5 server, you can consolidate virtual servers at higher ratios with increased performance, capacity and throughput while utilizing a smaller, half-width form factor for increased space savings.The added performance, memory footprint, I/O, and on-board storage of the UCS B200 M5 Blade Server offers additional OpEx savings with fewer servers to procure, power and cool, maintain, warranty, and purchase. Customers will be able to mix both M5 and previously supported M4 blades in VxBlock Systems, giving them more technology choice and investment protection.Enhanced Cisco Software for Intent-Based Networking with VscaleThe Vscale Architecture supports all three pillars of Cisco intent-based networking. This is a substantial benefit for any organization struggling to maintain a consistent network and security policy as their data centers grow to enormous capacity to support thousands of applications.The three pillars of intent-based networking are Cisco ACI, Tetration and Network Assurance Engine software. Together, they let you express your intent by writing policies about connectivity and security. The intent might be, “Keep the dev and prod environments separate,” “Quarantine all servers and VMs affected by the ABC attack” or “maintain certain configurations to assure specific performance and availability levels for applications XYZ.” The software translates this intent to configuration commands and continuously monitors all traffic flows and verifies all ACI and Nexus configurations to ensure that your intent is being met.As long-time partners, Dell EMC and Cisco are both excited about the many use cases and endless possibilities that intent-based networking offers our Vscale customers:“Together, Dell EMC and Cisco are deploying Vscale with ACI and Tetration to simplify and secure data center operations for some of the largest financial and transportation companies in the world.” said Roland Acra, SVP and GM for Cisco’s Data Center Networking. “We look forward to working with Dell EMC to deliver network assurance along with our industry leading network automation and analytics, to enable these IT operators to shift from being reactive to proactive and to be confident their networks are always operating coherently and as intended.” If you’re attending Cisco Live EMEA in Barcelona, please stop by our booth G13 and meet our experts. We’d love to speak with you about how VxBlock, Vscale, and Cisco intent-based networking make data centers simpler to manage so that IT experts can deliver more value for the business.###¹ IDC, The Business Value of Modernizing Mission-Critical Applications with Dell EMC VxBlock Systems, October 20172 ESG, Simplifying IT Infrastructure Upgrades with Dell EMC Converged Infrastructures Systems and Vision Intelligent Operations Software. January 2017³ Inovalon Dell EMC Vscale Architecture Case Studylast_img read more

first_imgDiscover our fun series that will ignite the data storage conversation with your customers.The world of data storage is a confusing place – it is easy for organizations to invest in solutions that aren’t up to the task.IT Managers need a hero. A guru who can spread the truth, simplify the data storage landscape, and help businesses choose the right solution for their specific needs.Be that hero to your customers.The Science of Storage is a series of bite-sized animated videos following the adventures of Steve the IT Manager and Archie the Storage Guru. The series covers a range of storage topics, dispels storage myths, and reveals the science behind Dell EMC’s leading data storage portfolio [1].How to utilize the seriesThe Science of Storage helps drive conversations with customers regarding their data storage pain points and proves that there’s a science to the Dell EMC storage portfolio.Become a storage guru for your customers. Simply:Watch the full seriesBecome familiar with the topicsShare relevant episodes with customers via The Science of Storage YouTube channelVisit the Partner Portal for additional sales assetsHave valuable data storage conversations with customersStart your quest today![1] IDC Worldwide Quarterly Enterprise Storage Systems Tracker, June 5, 2018last_img read more

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A divided Minnesota Court of Appeals on Monday upheld a former Minneapolis police officer’s murder conviction in the 2017 shooting death of an unarmed Australian woman who had dialed 911. Mohamed Noor is serving 12 1/2 years in the death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, whom he shot once in the stomach when she approached his patrol car in the alley behind her home. The Minneapolis Star Tribune reported that Noor challenged his third-degree murder conviction. The appeals court ruled 2-1 to uphold the conviction, with one judge saying he would have reversed Noor’s murder conviction and sent his case for sentencing on the lesser second-degree manslaughter charge.last_img read more

first_imgOn Thursday, the Saint Mary’s Class Gift Campaign paid homage to the ghostly inhabitants of Saint Mary’s with its Sweet Treats and Scary Stories event. It is rumored that various ghosts, including the spirit of Sister Madeleva, former president of the College, roam the halls of Saint Mary’s after hours. At the event, staff and students read excerpts from “Quiet Hours: Revealing the Mysteries,” a book written by three Saint Mary’s alumnae. This collection of short stories tells actual experiences of Saint Mary’s students, faculty and staff with ghosts around campus. Participants listened to ghost stories while enjoying a spread of sweets including a chocolate fondue bar, apple cider, hot chocolate, pumpkin pie and candy apples. “I had read ‘Quiet Hours’ before, but my favorite story is of the girl walking down the avenue,” first year Madeline Haverilla said. “A murderer sees her on the road, but doesn’t attack her because he sees someone walking with her, even though she was alone. It gave me the chills, but it also made me feel like there is someone looking out for us.” Continuing the scary theme of the night, students participated in a costume contest that awarded the scariest, creepiest costumes. First prize was a bobblehead figure of Dr. Carol Ann Mooney, president of Saint Mary’s College, and her husband George Efta. Due to cold temperatures, very few students dressed up. “I would have dressed up if it wasn’t so cold outside,” sophomore Kira Terrill said. The Class Gift Campaign also raffled off $50, $25 and $10 of munch money in a drawing. Students entered the drawing by picking up tickets at the dining hall and student center throughout the week and by presenting them upon arrival at the event. This year, the Class Gift Campaign co-sponsored the event with the Resident Hall Association (RHA). “RHA has always hosted an Autumn Harvest, an event with fall themed treats, for students. But this year, Class Gift Campaign approached us with the idea of working together on this event,” RHA President Kat Nelson said. “The event has had a great turnout. We had canoe races around the lake earlier, and then everyone came over afterwards. Some faculty and staff members brought their families, and it was great to see some professors with their kids.” The event also gave students the opportunity to make individual donations. “We hope that students will see how much tradition there is at Saint Mary’s and how important it is that everyone give back to the College,” Amy Dardinger, assistant director of Phonathon, said.  “It’s a fun event to host around Halloween time, but its also a way to remind students that many people before them made a Saint Mary’s education possible.”last_img read more

first_imgNotre Dame has appointed David Bailey as the new head of the Office of Strategic Planning and Institutional Research, according to a University press release. As associate vice president for strategic planning, Bailey will assist the Office of the President in developing the University’s strategic plan, assessing progress, overseeing departmental strategic planning and issuing reviews for the provost and executive vice president, the release stated. University President Fr. John Jenkins said Bailey’s past experience outside the University as well as his time as the interim head of the office have prepared him well for the position. “David’s experience as a Notre Dame alumnus, his time in the office he will now head, and his long and distinguished career in business amply equip him for this critical position,” Jenkins said in the release. “His appointment further strengthens the University’s advancement toward institutional excellence.” Bailey graduated from Notre Dame in 1983 before receiving an MBA from the Stern School of Business at New York University in 1997. He previously worked at IBM, Wall Street firm Gerard Klauer Mattison & Co. and Goldman Sachs.last_img read more

first_imgPope Francis’s recent apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” highlighted many of the economic and social justice issues of today’s world and prompted reactions from critics worldwide.  William Purcell, associate director for Catholic Social Tradition and Practice at the Center for Social Concerns, said the pope “is not being an idealist, but a realist with ideals.”  Purcell said the apostolic exhortation’s contents are both prescriptive and intellectual, focusing largely on pastoral theology and how the Church can engage and shepherd people. “Francis addresses [“Evangelii Gaudium”] to the whole people of God, so not just to the laity, but also to the bishops, clergy and religious,” Purcell said. “He’s talking to the leaders at all levels, including lay leaders … and he’s challenging us to find creative ways to share the key emphasis of God, which is love.”  Many of the critiques of and negative reaction to the text are “short-sighted,” Purcell said, misunderstanding the context of the pope’s statements and its background in Catholic Social Tradition. One notable criticism came from talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, who said Francis’s ideas were “pure Marxism” in a Nov. 27 show about the document, titled “It’s Sad How Wrong Pope Francis Is.”  Purcell said people should remember that the pope is writing about theology, not ideology. “What he’s really talking about is joy – that’s what ‘gaudium’ means,” Purcell said. “He’s talking about how we’re called to evangelize and that nobody likes a grim do-gooder. “What he’s saying is that we’ve got to be joyful about it, we’ve got to be embracing it. We should attract people by our actions, and so we should be joyful and life-giving.”  The apostolic exhortation is the first thing Francis has written completely on his own during his papacy, and Purcell said it presents his vision of what the Church is about, speaking from his position as the head of the institution. “I think it’s exciting because people have been taking notice,” Purcell said. “Some people react to it out of their ideology and not their theology, and people struggle with some of the things he’s talking about.”  Purcell said throughout the document, Francis quotes bishops from across the world, as well as past popes and saints. Because of this, the content “isn’t new, but part of our tradition.”  “His insight comes from talking about these things in a new style, in an uplifting way, so people see the power of what we’re called to do,” Purcell said. “He becomes so welcoming, so charismatic, and he speaks to the common person.  “It doesn’t become esoteric or dense, because he’s speaking to the person in the pew. People can read this and understand it … and I think they get excited by it.”  The four main themes of the text are joy, poverty, peace and justice, Purcell said. Beyond the thematic theological elements, Francis “becomes prescriptive and deals with real, concrete ways of addressing problems,” he said. “The beauty of the exhortation is that he writes so well, and he writes so positively and so openly,” Purcell said. “This is a pope who is a Jesuit, so he’s a thinker. There are ideals of things like solidarity and the common good, but he’s being a realist about how we try to address those things. “He gives concrete examples; he names saints or people or particular things so it doesn’t just become words like ‘solidarity,’ but you get the stories and symbols and scripture behind that makes it come alive.”  To best utilize the document’s wisdom, Purcell said parishes need to find a way to break it into parts and find pastoral applications for it. “It’s too much to swallow all at one time, because it’s so rich and there’s so much good within it,” he said. “But it’s fun to look at since [Pope Francis is] just so positive, and he speaks so directly. He’s prophetic, but not obnoxious.”  Contact Ann Marie Jakubowski at ajakubo1@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second installment in a three-part series discussing the Rutagengwa family’s search for God from the 1994 Rwandan genocide in light of their trip back to Rwanda in December.In April 1994, Jean Bosco and Christine Rutagengwa were preparing for their July wedding when the Rwandan genocide began. They became separated in the chaos.“We were getting ready for our wedding, and we survived at the Hotel [des] Mille Collines, now known as Hotel Rwanda,” Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said. “I got there first … praying to God to bring my fiancée there. I left the hotel to bring her back to the hotel, and that was to us a testimony that God listened to our prayers.“We stayed at the hotel about 40 days, and during those days, every day was a dangerous day.”The Hotel des Mille Collines was the only safe area at the time, but Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he left anyway, trusting God to keep him and his fiancée safe.“Every day in the hotel, we put ourselves in the hands of God,” he said. “We prayed for our safety every single day at the hotel. We were surrounded by the killers.“It was like a small island, or let’s say, a sinking boat surrounded by sharks. It was like the Titanic sinking surrounded by sharks.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he felt that he and Christine survived the genocide for a reason. After they were evacuated from the hotel by United Nations’ peacekeepers, others hiding there were killed by the militias, he said.“We were lucky enough to survive, and for us we have a mission — the mission is to spread a message of love,” he said. “We have a testimony that love is stronger than death. … Evil didn’t win.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he has drafted a manuscript about the search for God from the Rwandan genocide, to be published later this year.“Before the genocide, I was certain I was just like everybody else, thinking about your future, your family, not thinking much about other people, about being involved in the community,” he said. “After genocide, [my wife and I] really have changed. We both feel like we have a mission to be involved in the community.“Whenever it’s possible to help your neighbor … to help someone recover from tragedy, [you should] get involved in their affairs, help them live a better life. You only realize that when tragedy strikes your own life. Then you realize that other people need you. You don’t realize that until your own life is impacted.”Photo courtesy of Fr. Dan Groody While praying to God helped the Rutagengwas get through the genocide, Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said praying does not entail survival. However, God has a plan for everyone, he said.“We just listened to the teachings of our parents and the Church, and we were able to survive, and we thanked God for all He did for us,” he said. “However, we are well aware, aware that there are so many people who died in the genocide. It does not mean at all that they didn’t pray to God. I know they did.“My mother was a devout Catholic. She died. My father was. He died. Christine’s mother — she was Catholic. She died. And our siblings, they died. It does not mean at all that they didn’t pray to God. We don’t understand how God works. Some people die, others survive. In our cases, this is why we think we have a mission to be humble people, to show love, to spread the good word — maybe this is what God was telling us?”Christine Rutagengwa said the experience taught her to appreciate life.“The life we have is precious,” she said. “When you lose it, when it’s gone, you can’t find it. But material things — we lost our houses, we lost everything, but we found them after. But we never found our parents. We never found our sisters and brothers. So life is precious, it’s very precious and you can’t replace it. That’s what I realized.”The Rutagengwas, whose daughter Fiona Rutagengwa is a freshman at Notre Dame, returned to Rwanda in December with a group including theology professors Fr. Dan Groody and Fr. Virgil Elizondo, as well as project coordinator for the Institute of Latino Studies Colleen Cross.“We were happy to go back, even if it was not easy,” Christine Rutagengwa said. “It was not easy because we saw the memorials, and it brought back bad memories.“To see people like Fr. Dan [Groody] care and show us love — it made us feel better. It cannot take away our pain, but it’s kind of very good for us. When people care, they are not maybe many, but they are people who really care, who were able to see what happened to us. I really loved that experience I had with friends from the [United States]. It was a blessing to go there with them.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said the trip had two purposes.“Fr. Dan [Groody] had the idea to go to Rwanda,” he said. “We wanted to show our friends what happened to us, because we wanted [them] to know and understand what happened to our family.“In Rwanda they built memorials for the victims of the genocide, and some of our family is buried there … and the motivation to go there was to honor their memory, to go there and say some prayers for them, being surrounded by some of our friends from the [United States].”While in the United States, Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said he channels his mission into helping other survivors of the genocide come to terms with what they experienced.“When I moved to the [United States] in 2000, I devoted my time to supporting FORGES [Friends of Rwandan Genocide Survivors], an association created by Rwandan survivors living in New England,” he said. “For the last several years, I have organized in Boston with other FORGES members the annual commemoration of the genocide of the Tutsis, which takes place every April, and I have spoken at different events aimed at fighting the genocide ideology.”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa said his advice to people facing difficult situations is to hold onto faith.“Life is full of distractions, especially for young people, and whenever life issues arise, many forget that God is the answer and revert to their habits and distractions,” he said. “Putting God before everything is the only way to be happy and to be at peace. But it’s easier said than done. It requires sacrifice; it requires discipline; it requires humility.“But at the end, it saves lives.”Christine Rutagengwa said she and her husband still wonder why they survived the genocide and others did not, and they pray to God for guidance constantly.“We’re always looking, praying and asking God, ‘Why? What do you want me to do? What are the lessons you want me to give to the people who don’t know about or happen to ask? We know you are real. We know you are there,’” she said.“That is a kind of question we don’t know how to answer. We are trying. Maybe one day we’ll find out.”Tags: Rutagengwas, Rwanda, Rwandan Genocidelast_img read more

first_imgMargaret Morgan, rector of Howard Hall, gave a talk titled “Reconciliation: Why Should I Seek It?” Wednesday night at Legends as part of Campus Ministry’s Theology on Tap series. The lecture focused on what reconciliation means, the differences between reconciliation and forgiveness and why reconciliation is important in every day life.“A life without reconciliation is self-isolation, moving farther and farther away [from other people],” Morgan said. “Changing our lives due to annoyance or hurt, cutting ourselves off from people.”Morgan said this reluctance to open up to others is natural for everyone.“As humans we can relate to that. We do this all the time,” Morgan said. “If I have learned anything as a rector or as a teacher, it is that we are a conflict-averse people. … We are a honest communication avoiding people.“We love to talk about ideas, movies, sports, “The Bachelor,” “The Bachelorette,” but we don’t like to say how we feel to one another. Specifically, we don’t like to say how we feel to one another when that person is sitting in front of us.”The importance of reconciliation is preventing this distancing of ourselves in a relationship with God, Morgan said.“A fundamental belief in the Christian faith is that God created me to be in relationship with God. … When I mess up in my relationship with God, I have a choice,” Morgan said. “I can ask for forgiveness or I can start to pack up my things and be okay with moving a little further away from God.”Morgan said people often question the sacrament of reconciliation because they don’t realize the bearing it has on one’s relationship with God.“Oftentimes I hear the question, particular about reconciliation and the sacrament of confession,” Morgan said. “People say, ‘Why do I have to go to confession? Why does it have to be a sacrament?’. … It is not just saying you are forgiven, but that there is a relationship that is restored in this moment and that happens in this moment of reconciliation.”Forgiveness, however, is not the same as reconciliation, Morgan said.“We often forget that and put those two things together,” Morgan said. “[Forgiveness] is often an intimate and private journey. It doesn’t require working or sitting with another person. The journey to forgiveness is its own story and one that is required before you can reconcile, but it is still its own story.”In order to reconcile with others, we must first look past the person’s mistake, Morgan said.“We have to surround ourselves with the memories of that relationship,” she said. “We have to remember who this person is, we have to remember who we are and the context of this person. … We have to remember that people are people and often there is more to them than a simple mistake.”Morgan said the sacrament of reconciliation is ultimately important to repair our relationship with God after having made a mistake.“God has reconciled himself to us and now we must reconcile ourselves to God,” Morgan said. “We need the physical signs to do that. We need the help of a community. We need to feel the emotions that go along with working up the courage to say we’re sorry, of admitting to ourselves ⎯ as well to Christ ⎯ what we’ve done wrong and the most important thing we need in the sacrament, is to hear someone say to us, ‘You are forgiven.’”Tags: Campus Ministry, God, Howard Hall, Margaret Morgan, Reconciliation, Sacraments, Theology on Taplast_img read more

first_imgLooking for off-campus housing? The search just got easier with South Bend Student Housing, a new website created by six Notre Dame students in the Engineering, Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Masters Program (ESTEEM). The website makes finding residences, contacting land lords and securing listings faster and more convenient.Graduate students Keith Marrero, Amanda Miller, Conor Hanley, Eric Tilley, Nathan Higgins and Sean Liebscher are the co-founders of the website and business South Bend Student Housing, which went live in February. “It’s kind of like Amazon,” Marrero said. “You tell it what you want and it’ll tell you what’s available that meets your needs, and then you’re able to make an informed decision based on that.”Marrero said the website allows students to browse housing options in the South Bend area based on amenities and preferences. “One of our goals is to provide information for students about everything that’s available because a lot of students will hear about their housing through word of mouth,” he said. “You don’t really know everything that’s out there.”Although the co-founders are still in the process of contacting landlords and adding additional listings to the site, Marrero said the site already contains numerous housing options available for browsing. Students interested in a property can simply click the “Contact Landlord” button to email the owner directly. The website includes additional features such as a compare option. “One of our big features is the compare feature,” he said. “It enables you to compare three, four, however many properties you want on one page as opposed to having a million tabs open.”Marrero said there are means of comparison between properties to see if they include various features such as off-street parking or in-unit laundry. The distance from the residence to the University is also included. The website is especially helpful for graduate students who travel from various areas around the country and world and are likely unfamiliar with the South Bend area and housing options, Marrero said. The website first started out as a class assignment, but Marrero said the interviews the team conducted for class showed such positive feedback that students began asking when the website would go live. After deciding to make the project a reality, Marrero said the team received funding from an anonymous investor for the entrepreneurial venture. A beta site was created last fall and advertising through social media started in February. Students interested in learning more about off-campus options can visit the website southbendstudenthousing.com for more information. Tags: ESTEEM, South Bend Student Housinglast_img read more

first_imgGrace Tourville Former resident of Walsh Hall and mayor of West Hollywood Lindsey Horvath speaks to students on her wide-ranging career including stints in activism, advertising and city politics.The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy, the Gender Studies Program and ND Votes 2016 sponsored the lecture, titled “From Walsh Hall to City Hall.”“I am here to share with you that a degree in the Arts and Letters program is profitable. But more importantly, you can use that degree to make a difference,” Horvath said. “I had opportunities here that I would have never had anywhere. Here, we were able to talk about different issues, not only from an academic perspective, but from a values perspective. They really helped me understand how the lessons I was learning in the classroom can be applied to my real life.”After graduating from Notre Dame with a B.A. in political science and gender studies, Horvath worked in the entertainment advertising industry.“I was worried that I was contributing to the kind of culture we always discussed in my gender studies classes,” she said. “I was worried that I wasn’t contributing enough.”After moving to California from Los Angeles and beginning her career in creative advertising, Horvath said she met the mayor of Los Angeles while co-founding a local chapter of the National Organization for Women.“I knew from a very young age that I was called to be of service,” she said. “The government and law — that’s how I wanted to make a difference. I felt that I could use that to make a difference.”Horvath worked on multiple local commissions after serving a short term on the West Hollywood city council after receiving an appointment through a special election held among the other council members. At the end of her special term, she ran for the position in the 2011 election but lost. She continued to grow her career in entertainment by working at a tech startup in Los Angeles and starting her own advertising company.Horvath said during this time, she considered herself an activist and was very involved with her local community.“During that time, life was not very centered, not very balanced,” she said. “I didn’t know where I was going. My friend, the mayor, came to me saying ‘I’m not going to seek re-election,’ and I worried because she was the only woman on the city council. So I asked her, ‘Who is going to run?’ And she said, ‘You are.’”Horvath said her friend’s encouragement prompted her to once again run for city council. The West Hollywood city council elects its mayor, and on March 3, the same night Horvath was elected onto city council, she officially became the mayor of West Hollywood.Horvath said her policy focuses on helping the most marginalized sections of society, including LGBT homeless teens. She prides herself on bringing what she calls “new ways of thinking” to the political community.“Throughout that process, I came from someone who was outright rejected, to someone who was embraced by the community,” Horvath said. “Statistically, it’s proven that women needed to be asked about nine times before they consider running for office. So for the women in the room, consider this the first time you’re being asked.”According to Horvath, more than 50 percent of West Hollywood’s residents are less than 40 years old, but she is the only member of the city council that is under 40. She tries to encourage young people to get involved with the local government by creating task forces that younger generations can be involved with.“A new generation of leadership isn’t just important — it is essential,” Horvath said. “It is essential for the way our society works. Our generation has so much to offer. I see the potential for this generational divide to tear us apart — that’s one of the reasons that I want to create age-friendly communities.”Horvath encouraged all students to follow their passions, attributing her current to success to the passions she discovered at Notre Dame.“Pursuing your passion is always worth it. I worked hard [at Notre Dame], and here is where I learned how to be myself and that’s exactly how I am able to do the things I do,” she said. “Letting people know who you are and what you’re about not only helps other people figure out who they are, but helps you better understand who you truly are.”Tags: Arts and Letters, city council, Hollywood, mayor, West Hollywood Notre Dame alumna Lindsey Horvath has been called to do many things since her graduation from the University in 2004. Horvath, who spoke at Geddes Hall on Monday, has been an activist, an advertising executive and, now, a mayor over the course of her professional career.“You never know when you’re going to be called up to do the thing you’re meant to do,” she said. “But trust me, you’re ready to do the thing you are meant to do, no matter when you’re called to do it.”last_img read more